3

I've come up with this simple, asynchronous dependency-injection container in TypeScript:

function Container<P extends { [name: string]: { (c: any): Promise<any> } }>(provider: P) {
    const cache: { [name in keyof P]?: Promise<any> } = {};

    const container = function(name: keyof P) {
        if (!cache[name]) {
            cache[name] = provider[name](container);
        }

        return cache[name];
    }

    return container;
}

Here's a simple use-case example:

class UserCache { }

class UserService {
    constructor(private cache: UserCache) { }
}

let container = Container({
    "cache": async c => new UserCache(),
    "user-service": async c => new UserService(await c("cache"))
});

container("user-service").then(service => {
    console.log(service);
});

So to briefly explain what's expected here: the Container function is basically a "type-cast" that takes a map of service-definitions (a provider) and returns a factory-function aka the container. The service-definitions receive the container instance, so that they can look up their dependencies, and return a Promise that resolves to the service instance.

I need help with the type-declarations.

I've gotten as far as type-checking the name argument - the resulting container function accepts only keys that exist in the provider, so far, so good.

What's missing is the generic return-type of calls to the container, so that, in turn, nested service-look-ups such as await c("cache") can be resolved and type-checked correctly.

Any idea how to do that?

2 Answers 2

4

The problem is to make the compiler to infer correct type for this container:

let container = Container({
    "cache": async c => new UserCache(),
    "user-service": async c => new UserService(await c("cache"))
});

But it depends on the type of the argument which is passed to Container, which is an object literal, so compiler looks at the type of property initializers:

async c => new UserCache()

and sees that c does not have type annotation, so it's type must be inferred, and the constraint is that it's the same type as container - oops, TypeScript does not equipped well to do type inference with circular constraints.

c gets inferred as any, there's no way around it:

// let's start with imaginary type P which maps names to provided types

// and declare desired container type
type ContainerFunc<P> = <N extends keyof P>(n: N) => Promise<P[N]>;

// and its argument type
type ProviderType<P> = { [N in keyof P]: (c: ContainerFunc<P>) => Promise<P[N]> };


function Container<P>(provider: ProviderType<P>): ContainerFunc<P> {
    const cache: { [N in keyof P]?: Promise<P[N]> } = {};

    const container = function<N extends keyof P>(name: N): Promise<P[N]> {
        if (!cache[name]) {
            cache[name] = provider[name](container);
        }

        return cache[name];
    }

    return container;
}

class UserCache { cache: {} }

class UserService {
    constructor(private cache: UserCache) { }
}

let container = Container({
    "cache": async c => new UserCache(),
    "user-service": async c => new UserService(await c("cache"))
});

To remove circularity, you have to remove c parameter - it's always the container itself, let's use it as such:

type ContainerFunc<P> = <N extends keyof P>(n: N) => Promise<P[N]>;

type ProviderType<P> = { [N in keyof P]: () => Promise<P[N]> };

function Container<P>(provider: ProviderType<P>): ContainerFunc<P> {
    const cache: { [N in keyof P]?: Promise<P[N]> } = {};

    const container = function<N extends keyof P>(name: N): Promise<P[N]> {
        if (!cache[name]) {
            cache[name] = provider[name]();
        }

        return cache[name];
    }

    return container;
}

class UserCache { cache: {} }

class UserService {
    constructor(private cache: UserCache) { }
}

let container = Container({
    "cache": async () => new UserCache(),
    "user-service": async () => new UserService(await container("cache"))
});

But now container type is inferred as any, because initializer for "user-service" refers to container in the function body, which prevents inferring that function return type.

You have to add return type annotation:

let container = Container({
    "cache": async () => new UserCache(),
    "user-service": async (): Promise<UserService> => new UserService(await container("cache"))
});

Now it's working:

let container = Container({
    "cache": async () => new UserCache(),
    "user-service": async (): Promise<UserService> => new UserService(await container("user-service"))
});

// error: Argument of type 'UserService' is not assignable to parameter of type 'UserCache'.

I believe it's the best that you can get.

Update as you suggested in comment, the other way to avoid circularity is to spell out all provider names and provided types in advance, before the implementation:

type ContainerFunc<P> = <N extends keyof P>(n: N) => Promise<P[N]>;

type ProviderType<P> = { [N in keyof P]: (c: ContainerFunc<P>) => Promise<P[N]> };


function Container<P>(provider: ProviderType<P>): ContainerFunc<P> {
    const cache: { [N in keyof P]?: Promise<P[N]> } = {};

    const container = function<N extends keyof P>(name: N): Promise<P[N]> {
        if (!cache[name]) {
            cache[name] = provider[name](container);
        }

        return cache[name];
    }

    return container;
}

class UserCache { cache: {} }

class UserService {
    constructor(private cache: UserCache) { }
}

interface ProviderTypes {
    cache: UserCache;
    "user-service": UserService;
}

let container = Container<ProviderTypes>({
    "cache": async c => new UserCache(),
    "user-service": async c => new UserService(await c("cache"))
});
9
  • Yeah this was the solution I was thinking about as well, the circular nature of the object literal type makes the compiler refuse to infer the type unfortunately. Would the op be interested in an alternative approach that does not use a single object literal for initialization? I believe we could get a better solution with such an apoach? Commented Jul 4, 2018 at 17:34
  • @artem does it matter what type the c argument is? whether it's the container or an identical, anonymous type - shouldn't matter. can we duplicate the declaration? Commented Jul 5, 2018 at 6:05
  • @TitianCernicova-Dragomir I'd be fine with refactoring to a class with a get-method, if that makes it possible? Commented Jul 5, 2018 at 6:06
  • refactored to a class if either of you can figure out how to type-hint the container argument? :-) Commented Jul 5, 2018 at 6:59
  • @mindplay.dk I was not necessarily thinking about the container being a class, the way we build the container is the problem, I added an alternative solution, hope it helps Commented Jul 5, 2018 at 7:25
3

As @artem mentioned, the compiler refuses to infer the type of an object literal if the inferred type references itself in any way (it's an outright limitation, the compiler will even mention this), so for the current structure you have @artem's answer is the best you are going to get.

A refactoring you could consider is one where you don't add the providers in one go, but rather using an add method on a container builder class. The return type of the add will return a new container builder that can resolve the types added up until that point so a newly added service can only make use of services already registered (making lemonade out of lemons, this might not be totally bad as it avoids circular references)

An implementation would look something like this:

function Container() {
    type ContainerFunc<P> = <N extends keyof P>(n: N) => P[N];
    class ContainerBuilder<T extends { [P in keyof T]: Promise<any> }> {
        public constructor(private provider: { [P in keyof T]: (c: any) => T[P] } = {} as any) {

        }
        public add<K extends string, V>(name: K, p: (c: ContainerFunc<T>)=> Promise<V>): ContainerBuilder<T & { [P in K]: Promise<V> }> {
            this.provider[name] = p;
            return this as any;
        }

        finish() : ContainerFunc<{ [P in keyof T]: T[P]}> {
            const provider = this.provider;
            const cache: { [name in keyof T]?: Promise<any> } = {};
            const container = function<K extends keyof T>(name: K) : T[K]  {
                if (!cache[name]) {
                    cache[name] = provider[name](container);
                }

                return cache[name] as any;
            }
            return container as any;

        }
    }

    return new ContainerBuilder()
}

class UserCache { }
class OfficeCache {}
class UserService {
    constructor(private cache: UserCache, private officeCache?: OfficeCache) { }
}


var c = Container()
    .add("user", async ()=> new UserCache())
    // all typed corectly, no any, the comented code below would be an error as office has not been registered yet
    .add("user-service", async c=> new UserService(await c("user") /* , await c("office") */)) 
    .add("office", async c=> new OfficeCache())
.finish();

let userService = c("user-service");
3
  • "the compiler refuses to infer the type of an object literal if the inferred type references itself" - but does it have to? the container argument doesn't have to be the same type, it could be a different (maybe anonymous) type with an identical signature. we can't avoid the circular inference that way? Commented Jul 5, 2018 at 12:29
  • @mindplay.dk There is no way to type c except relative to the current object literal, and this is the relation that will cause the compiler to complain. Because to type c it needs to know the type of the object literal, and to fully type the object literal it needs to know the type of c.. Commented Jul 5, 2018 at 12:31
  • @mindplay.dk I see artem updated his answer, if you are willing to write out the providers in an interface before hand, that will work, I hadn't considered this approach as spelling out the providers twice seems like too much overhead... Commented Jul 5, 2018 at 13:09

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