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I have square matrix A and I want to create matrix Z which elements are zero everywhere except for an i'th row, and the i'th row is j'th row of matrix A.

I am aware of two ways to accomplish this. The fist one is fairly straightforward and seems to be the most effective performance-wise:

def do_this(mx: np.array, i: int, j: int):
    Z = np.zeros_like(mx)
    Z[i, :] = mx[j, :]
    return Z

The other, less straightforward way and seemingly much less efficient, is to prepare a mx matrix beforehand, which a zero matrix of the same shape as A, but has 1 in it's (i, j) position, and then to calculate Z as mx @ A.

def do_this_other_way(mx: np.array, ref_mx: np.array):
    return ref_mx @ mx

I decided to benchmark both approaches:

from time import time
import numpy as np

n = 20
num_iters = 5000
A = np.random.rand(n, n)
i, j = 5, 10

t = time()
for _ in range(num_iters):
    Z = do_this(A, i, j)
print((time() - t) / num_iters)

ref_mx = np.zeros_like(A)
ref_mx[i, j] = 1
t = time()
for _ in range(num_iters):
    Z = do_this_other_way(A, ref_mx)
print((time() - t) / num_iters)

However, when A is relatively small (on my laptop it means that A's size is less than 40), do_this_other_way wins, and when A has size like 20, it wins by an order of magnitude. That's it: I have doubts that I am doing it the most effective way possible in numpy. Is it possible to do it better without resorting to writing your own low-level implementation of do_this?

  • What is your question? (Also, do not use time for timing.) – DYZ Jul 4 '18 at 18:42
  • "Is it possible to do it better without resorting to writing your own low-level implementation of do_this?" – G. Reinhardt Jul 4 '18 at 18:45

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