In Haskell, it is very easy to write algebraic data types (ADTs) with functions. This allows us to write interpreters that rely on native functions for substitutions, i.e., a higher-order abstract syntax (HOAS), which is known to be very efficient. For example, this is a simple λ-calculus interpreter using that technique:

data Term
  = Hol Term
  | Var Int
  | Lam (Term -> Term)
  | App Term Term

pretty :: Term -> String
pretty = go 0 where
  go lvl term = case term of
    Hol hol     -> go lvl hol 
    Var idx     -> "x" ++ show idx
    Lam bod     -> "λx" ++ show lvl ++ ". " ++ go (lvl+1) (bod (Hol (Var lvl)))
    App fun arg -> "(" ++ go lvl fun ++ " " ++ go lvl arg ++ ")"

reduce :: Term -> Term
reduce (Hol hol)     = hol
reduce (Var idx)     = Var idx
reduce (Lam bod)     = Lam (\v -> reduce (bod v))
reduce (App fun arg) = case reduce fun of
  Hol fhol      -> App (Hol fhol) (reduce arg)
  Var fidx      -> App (Var fidx) (reduce arg)
  Lam fbod      -> fbod (reduce arg)
  App ffun farg -> App (App ffun farg) (reduce arg)

main :: IO ()
main
  = putStrLn . pretty . reduce
  $ App
    (Lam$ \x -> App x x)
    (Lam$ \s -> Lam$ \z -> App s (App s (App s z)))

Notice how native functions were used rather than de Bruijn indices. That makes the interpreter considerably faster than it would be if we substituted applications manually.

I'm aware Rust has closures and many Fn() types, but I'm not sure they work exactly like Haskell closures in this situation, much less how to express that program given the low-level nature of Rust. Is it possible to represent HOAS in Rust? How would the Term datatype be represented?

  • What makes you think it wouldn't be possible? After all, Rust is Turing Complete... – Matthieu M. Jul 5 at 13:07
  • 1
    @MatthieuM. this is not possible on a Turing machine, because this has no notion of “native functions”. You could only emulate it, but that would require something like the De Bruijn indices mentioned in the question. – leftaroundabout Jul 5 at 13:49
  • 2
    @MatthieuM. Turing completeness means that it can reproduce any input-output behavior a Turing machine can have. It does not mean that the language can directly express high-level concepts. E.g. C has no native closures (even though it can be used to write a Rust interpreter, which has closures). Rust has no dependent types (even though it can interpret Agda which has them). – chi Jul 5 at 13:49
  • @chi: Sure, but you can emulate closures in C by bundling arguments in a struct and passing a function pointer. I could literally translate the Rust snippet below to C: it would be lower-level, but a 1-to-1 match of semantics. So I question at which point one concludes it's "not supported". – Matthieu M. Jul 5 at 14:07
  • 5
    @MatthieuM. of course it is possible to implement. The question was whether it was possible to use native Rust closures for substitution. Rust could be Turing-complete yet provide no means for using its closures on your own DSL interpreter, so you would need to implement fast closures yourself (could be a millions-dollars budget project) if you wanted to have fast substitutions. – MaiaVictor Jul 5 at 14:15
up vote 25 down vote accepted

As a fan of lambda calculus I decided to attempt this and it is indeed possible, though a bit less sightly than in Haskell (playground link):

use std::rc::Rc;
use Term::*;

#[derive(Clone)]
enum Term {
    Hol(Box<Term>),
    Var(usize),
    Lam(Rc<dyn Fn(Term) -> Term>),
    App(Box<Term>, Box<Term>),
}

impl Term {
    fn app(t1: Term, t2: Term) -> Self {
        App(Box::new(t1), Box::new(t2))
    }

    fn lam<F: Fn(Term) -> Term + 'static>(f: F) -> Self {
        Lam(Rc::new(f))
    }

    fn hol(t: Term) -> Self {
        Hol(Box::new(t))
    }
}

fn pretty(term: Term) -> String {
    fn go(lvl: usize, term: Term) -> String {
        match term {
            Hol(hol) => go(lvl, *hol),
            Var(idx) => format!("x{}", idx),
            Lam(bod) => format!("λx{}. {}", lvl, go(lvl + 1, bod(Term::hol(Var(lvl))))),
            App(fun, arg) => format!("({} {})", go(lvl, *fun), go(lvl, *arg)),
        }
    }

    go(0, term)
}

fn reduce(term: Term) -> Term {
    match term {
        Hol(hol) => *hol,
        Var(idx) => Var(idx),
        Lam(bod) => Term::lam(move |v| reduce(bod(v))),
        App(fun, arg) => match reduce(*fun) {
            Hol(fhol) => Term::app(Hol(fhol), reduce(*arg)),
            Var(fidx) => Term::app(Var(fidx), reduce(*arg)),
            Lam(fbod) => fbod(reduce(*arg)),
            App(ffun, farg) => Term::app(Term::app(*ffun, *farg), reduce(*arg)),
        },
    }
}

fn main() {
    // (λx. x x) (λs. λz. s (s (s z)))
    let term1 = Term::app(
        Term::lam(|x| Term::app(x.clone(), x.clone())), 
        Term::lam(|s| Term::lam(move |z| 
            Term::app(
                s.clone(),
                Term::app(
                    s.clone(),
                    Term::app(
                        s.clone(),
                        z.clone()
    ))))));

    // λb. λt. λf. b t f
    let term2 = Term::lam(|b| Term::lam(move |t| 
        Term::lam({
            let b = b.clone(); // necessary to satisfy the borrow checker
            move |f| Term::app(Term::app(b.clone(), t.clone()), f)
        })
    ));

    println!("{}", pretty(reduce(term1))); // λx0. λx1. (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 x1)))))))))))))))))))))))))))
    println!("{}", pretty(reduce(term2))); // λx0. λx1. λx2. ((x0 x1) x2)
}

Thanks to BurntSushi5 for the suggestion to use Rc that I always forget exists and to Shepmaster for suggesting to remove the unnecessary Box under Rc in Lam and how to satisfy the borrow checker in longer Lam chains.

  • 4
    You can satisfy Clone by using reference counting: play.rust-lang.org/… --- I suspect this code could be cleaned up quite a bit with the help of a few convenient constructors instead of using value constructors directly everywhere. – BurntSushi5 Jul 5 at 10:57
  • Impressive! I was not hoping for such a complete answer, but I hope it becomes a reference for anyone trying to HOAS in Rust. It indeed uses many features I wasn't aware of. Just a clarification: how would you replicate Lam$ \a -> Lam$ \b -> Lam$ \c -> c? I've tried Term::lam(|a| Term::lam(move |b| Term::lam(move |c| c))) but I get an error related to the move. – MaiaVictor Jul 5 at 13:59
  • @MaiaVictor are you sure? I just tried your exact piece of code with the above implementation and got λx0. λx1. λx2. x2: playground link. – ljedrz Jul 5 at 14:02
  • 1
    @MaiaVictor as it proved to be quite a challenge (even though the solution looks a bit silly) I expanded the answer with that term and added a playground link for easier access. Enjoy! – ljedrz Jul 5 at 20:22
  • 1
    @ljedrz oh. The solution actually makes a lot of sense. Yes, it was trickier than I expected, so I gave up a few minutes after my comment (should've clarified). Thanks for the answer and research. This was very informative and I really hope it will be useful to more people. – MaiaVictor Jul 5 at 22:27

The accepted solution uses Rc to create a clonable heap allocated closure.

Technically speaking, this is not necessary as there is no runtime reference counting needed. All we need is a closure as a trait object and that is also clonable.

However, Rust 1.29.2 does not allow us to have things like dyn Clone + FnOnce(Term) -> Term, this restriction may be relaxed in the future. The restriction has two factors: Clone is not object safe (which is unlikely to be relaxed) and if we combine two traits together, one of them has to be an auto trait (this can be relaxed IMHO).

Whilst waiting for the language improvement, we can introduce a new trait to get around this:

// Combination of FnOnce(Term) -> Term and Clone
trait TermLam {
    // The FnOnce part, declared like an Fn, because we need object safety
    fn app(&self, t: Term) -> Term;
    // The Clone part, but we have to return sized objects 
    // (not Self either because of object safety), so it is in a box
    fn clone_box(&self) -> Box<dyn TermLam>;
}

// Blanket implementation for appropriate types
impl<F> TermLam for F
where
    F: 'static/*' highlighting fix */ + Clone + FnOnce(Term) -> Term
{
    // Note: when you have a Clone + FnOnce, you effectively have an Fn
    fn app(&self, t: Term) -> Term {
        (self.clone())(t)
    }

    fn clone_box(&self) -> Box<dyn TermLam> {
        Box::new(self.clone())
    }
}

// We can now clone the box
impl Clone for Box<dyn TermLam> {
    fn clone(&self) -> Self {
        self.clone_box()
    }
}

Then we can remove the need to use Rc.

#[derive(Clone)]
enum Term {
    Hol(Box<Term>),
    Var(usize),
    Lam(Box<dyn TermLam>),
    App(Box<Term>, Box<Term>),
}

impl Term {
    fn app(t1: Term, t2: Term) -> Self {
        App(Box::new(t1), Box::new(t2))
    }

    fn lam<F>(f: F) -> Self
    where
       F: 'static/*' highlighting fix */ + Clone + FnOnce(Term) -> Term        
    {
        Lam(Box::new(f))
    }

    fn hol(t: Term) -> Self {
        Hol(Box::new(t))
    }
}

fn pretty(term: Term) -> String {
    fn go(lvl: usize, term: Term) -> String {
        match term {
            Hol(hol) => go(lvl, *hol),
            Var(idx) => format!("x{}", idx),
            Lam(bod) => format!("λx{}. {}", lvl, go(lvl + 1, bod.app(Term::hol(Var(lvl))))),
            App(fun, arg) => format!("({} {})", go(lvl, *fun), go(lvl, *arg)),
        }
    }

    go(0, term)
}

fn reduce(term: Term) -> Term {
    match term {
        Hol(hol) => *hol,
        Var(idx) => Var(idx),
        Lam(bod) => Term::lam(move |v| reduce(bod.app(v))),
        App(fun, arg) => match reduce(*fun) {
            Hol(fhol) => Term::app(Hol(fhol), reduce(*arg)),
            Var(fidx) => Term::app(Var(fidx), reduce(*arg)),
            Lam(fbod) => fbod.app(reduce(*arg)),
            App(ffun, farg) => Term::app(Term::app(*ffun, *farg), reduce(*arg)),
        },
    }
}

fn main() {
    // (λx. x x) (λs. λz. s (s (s z)))
    let term1 = Term::app(
        Term::lam(|x| Term::app(x.clone(), x.clone())),
        Term::lam(|s| {
            Term::lam(move |z| {
                Term::app(
                    s.clone(),
                    Term::app(s.clone(), Term::app(s.clone(), z.clone())),
                )
            })
        }),
    );

    // λb. λt. λf. b t f
    let term2 = Term::lam(|b| {
        Term::lam(move |t| {
            Term::lam({
                //let b = b.clone(); No longer necessary for Rust 1.29.2
                move |f| Term::app(Term::app(b.clone(), t.clone()), f)
            })
        })
    });

    println!("{}", pretty(reduce(term1))); // λx0. λx1. (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 (x0 x1)))))))))))))))))))))))))))
    println!("{}", pretty(reduce(term2))); // λx0. λx1. λx2. ((x0 x1) x2)
}

Playground

This was the original way that the other answer attempted, which the author was unable to resolve.

  • @shepmaster I personally prefer (FnOnce(Term) -> Term) + Clone + 'static than (FnOnce(Term) -> Term + Clone + 'static), as the former makes it clear FnOnce(Term) -> Term is a single trait, and cannot be understood as FnOnce(Term) -> (Term + Clone) + 'static or something like that. – Earth Engine Oct 15 at 2:14
  • 1
    You are welcome to change it back, that's just what rustfmt corrects it to. I tend to put those before the Fn: Clone + FnOnce.. . You should open a rustfmt issue if you think that it actively makes your code less clear. – Shepmaster Oct 15 at 2:18
  • You gave a very good idea. Usually when it is unambiguous it is better to write the main trait first, then the decoration traits, then lifetimes. However, if things becomes confusing there is no reason to not using the opposite. – Earth Engine Oct 15 at 3:53

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