1

Microsoft Edge Version: 41.16299.402.0

I've noticed an oddity with Edge in that providing an anonymous function with array.sort() doesn't appear to sort my array of objects correctly. My function works in Firefox and Chrome though. The code below serves as an example of the issue I'm running into:

data = [
    {title: "First", language: "English"}, 
    {title: "Second", language: "Armenian"},
    {title: "Third", language: "Cantonese"}
];

data.forEach(function(val){
    console.log(val);
});

data.sort(function(a,b) { console.log(a.language > b.language); return a.language > b.language;});

data.forEach(function(val){
    console.log(val);
});

If you run that code in JSFiddle in Chrome or Firefox, you'll notice that the second set of console logs is sorted alphabetically by language. Run it in Edge however and there won't be any difference between the two sets. I'm assuming that this has to do with how I am handling sort() and not a bug in Edge (seems like something that would have been fixed a long time ago if that were the case). Does anyone know what's wrong with my sort syntax?

Screenshot of console log from Chrome: enter image description here

Screenshot of console log from Edge:

enter image description here

5

The problem is, you return the value of a comparison, which is either true or false, which is interpreted as numerical value of 1 and 0. Basically it misses the value of -1 which is necessary to return a sucessfull sorting.

var data = [{ title: "First", language: "English" }, { title: "Second", language: "Armenian" }, { title: "Third", language: "Cantonese" }];

data.sort(function(a, b) { 
    return a.language > b.language || -(a.language < b.language);
});

console.log(data);

Just for completeness, for strings, you could use String#localeCompare which has some more features, like natural sorting, or localized possiblities.

var data = [{ title: "First", language: "English" }, { title: "Second", language: "Armenian" }, { title: "Third", language: "Cantonese" }];

data.sort(function(a, b) { 
    return a.language.localeCompare(b.language);
});

console.log(data);

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you - this worked. I'm assuming then that Chrome and Firefox are doing extra work in the background for me to help me avoid these pitfalls? – Jason Long Jul 5 '18 at 17:59
  • And according to Array.prototype.sort() it is supported by Edge – lealceldeiro Jul 5 '18 at 17:59
  • Have you any explanation for why OP's code would work in other browsers? – Teemu Jul 5 '18 at 17:59
  • it looks like edge is respecting zero return as ok, where as all other implementations the values with zero gets another check. – Nina Scholz Jul 5 '18 at 18:11
  • Why the complexity? Just return a.language.localeCompare(b.language) would be sufficient and also (potentially) locale-aware. No need for < and > (and the coercion from boolean to number). – T.J. Crowder Jul 6 '18 at 9:01

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