1

Hi!

I am expecting #<PrettyThing:0x0055a958175348 @success="anything here">

but I am getting 'anything here' instead. Any idea why?

class Thing
  attr_accessor :success

  def execute
    self.success = execute!
  rescue
    self.success = false
  ensure
    self
  end
end

class PrettyThing < Thing
  def execute!
    'anything here'
  end
end

p PrettyThing.new.execute # => 'anything here'
  • Why are you even using ensure? Just have the rescue..end, then self. There is absolutely no need for ensure here. – ForeverZer0 Jul 6 '18 at 0:45
  • @ForeverZer0 If I do that, if I remove the ensure and just add 'end', well, that'd be the end of the method. Or do you mean I should add a begin at the top instead? – Claudio Jul 6 '18 at 1:27
  • Just remove the ensure part. Replace ensure with an end, and remove the first end under self to edit your exact example. – ForeverZer0 Jul 6 '18 at 2:53
3

Ensure is a tricky thing. Normally, it doesn't return a value, and instead the return value from the last executed line of the main or rescue block is returned, unless there was an uncaught error, then the error is returned. But, if you explicitly return, then you will get the return value. This is a bit nonstandard and confusing though, because the intent of the ensure clause is for silent cleanup. It may be better to move your return value outside your begin/rescue block.

  • 1
    Thank you. You are good. Your comment really helped me. I hacked it with a 'return' but your comment has made me realise so much more and yes.. you are right, it's obscure. Better to add an 'end' and then return naturally. – Claudio Jul 6 '18 at 1:20
  • I would argue that the behaviour of 'ensure' is just as obscure as my code is :) – Claudio Jul 6 '18 at 1:20
3

Try:

class Thing
  attr_accessor :success

  def execute
    self.success = execute!
    self
  rescue
    self.success = false
  end
end

class PrettyThing < Thing
  def execute!
    'anything here'
  end
end

p PrettyThing.new.execute # => <PrettyThing:0x0000000379ea48 @success="anything here">

The way you have it written, execute is returning the assignment result of self.success = execute!. By adding self, you return the instance of PrettyThing.

This is handy if you want to chain methods, like:

class Thing
  attr_accessor :success

  def execute
    self.success = execute!
    self
  rescue
    self.success = false
  end

  def foo
    puts 'foo'
  end

end

class PrettyThing < Thing
  def execute!
    'anything here'
  end
end

p PrettyThing.new.execute.foo # => foo

Given your comment, I think I'd probably do it something more like:

class Thing
  attr_accessor :success

  alias success? success

  def foo
    puts 'foo'
  end

end

class PrettyThing < Thing

  def execute
    @success = everything_worked
    self
  end

private

  def everything_worked
    # your logic goes here
    # return true if all is good
    # return false or nil if all is not good
    true
  end

end

pretty_thing = PrettyThing.new.execute
p pretty_thing.success? # => true

If everything_worked returns false or nil, then pretty_thing.success? will also return false or nil.

  • isn't the ensure block then redundant (and effectively a no-op) in this case? – Garrett Motzner Jul 6 '18 at 1:08
  • @GarrettMotzner - sorry, I was copying and pasting too fast. Updated. BTW, that rescue block looks funky anyhow. But, that's not the OP's root problem. – jvillian Jul 6 '18 at 1:09
  • @jvillian why does it look funny? It's my ServiceBase. All services will inherit from it. And I want them all to fail silently so that the controller can then gracefully ask "service.success?" and if that's false I can return nice 500s VS just crashing. What are your thoughts? – Claudio Jul 6 '18 at 1:23
  • @jvillian BTW Thank you so much for the answer. I +1'd it as it's helpful and descriptive. I was certainly not expecting this behaviour by a simple "ensure". Typical Ruby. Meh :) – Claudio Jul 6 '18 at 1:24

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