2

Please see the code below:

private  static boolean flag=true; // main thread will call flag=false

private final static Object lock=new Object(); // lock condition

public static void thread1(){

    while (flag){

        synchronized (lock){
            // some work
        }

    }

}


public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

    Thread t1=new Thread(()->{
        thread1();
    });
    t1.start();
    Thread.sleep(1000);
    flag=false;

    // The program can stop normally

}

No matter at any time , When one thread entering the synchronized block, will the value of the variable flag be loaded from main memory?

Thank you for your detailed explanation, because I am not sure if the flag has a happend-befores relationship. Literally, the flag is not in the synchronized block.

Update1:

I know that using volatile can and I also know how to write the right code,, but I want to know now if there is no volatile keyword. Whether synchronized can guarantee visibility. Note: the flag variable is not in synchronized block.

Update2:

I updated the code again, the code on my win10+JDK8 system can stop normally, do you think it is correct or accidental, because it is not tested on all hardware systems, so I need theory to guide。

Focus on the question:

whether the loop condition (flag variable) has a happen-before relationship with the synchroized block inside the loop,If it has a happen-before relationship, jvm whether ensure that the flag variable is loaded from main memory even if the flag variable is not in the synchronized block.

If every one think there is no happen-before relationship, then how do you explain that when I remove the synchronized block, the code will loop indefinitely. When I add it, it will stop normally. Is this just an accident?

  • Could just make the flag volatile :} It's a somewhat pedantically interesting question, though. – user2864740 Jul 9 '18 at 3:10
  • I don't think so. synchronized only locks an object to prevent another thread from entering (which would block those threads). What you need is to make the flag volatile. – Jai Jul 9 '18 at 3:15
  • 1
    Basically yes (I'm contradicting Jai here). In Java, the ideas of mutex and memory visibility are packed into the same operations. So volatile works here, but so does synchronized and they basically do the same thing. Note that your example is bad because flag is public. Normally you make the field private so that calling code must go through the synchronized block for any access. Then the field is considered thread safe. – markspace Jul 9 '18 at 3:20
  • Also a "detailed explanation" is far too broad to cover here. Get the book Java Concurrency in Practice by Brian Goetz (jcip.net) for the full story. It's the best book on Java threading and concurrency. – markspace Jul 9 '18 at 3:22
  • Possible duplicate of Difference between volatile and synchronized in Java – Jai Jul 9 '18 at 3:30
3

OK looking a little more closely at your code, what you have is not enough. The access to a shared field is outside of your synchronized block, so no it does not work.

In addition, Java requires that both the read and the write of shared memory be "synchronized" somehow. Using the synchronized keyworld, that usually means you need to use it on both the read and the write, and you did not show the write.

And in addition to that, the "lock" that you use for a given set of fields or shared memory must be the same lock for both the read and the write. Seriously, volatile is a lot easier here, and the API in java.util.concurrent is even easier and recommended. Don't try reinventing the wheel.

private static boolean flag = true; // must use 'resetFlag'

public void resetFlag() { synchronized( "lock" ) {flag = false;} }

public boolean getFlag() { synchronized( "lock" ) {return flag;} }

public void thread1() {
    while ( getFlag() ){
        synchronized ("lock"){
            // other work
        }
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

    Thread t1=new Thread(()->{
        thread1();
    });
    t1.start();
    Thread.sleep(1000);
    resetFlag();

    // The program can stop normally

}

I think the above has the required changes.

Regarding your second update: the code on my win10+JDK8 system can stop normally Yes it can. Memory visibility is not guaranteed, but it is not prohibited. Memory can be made visible for any reason, even just "accidentally." On Intel platforms, Intel has a QPI bus which exchanges memory update information at high speed, bypassing the memory bus. However even that can be got around by software, so it's best to just put the synchronization where needed (Hint: look at AtomicBoolean.)

  • Thanks for the answer, please see the update. – Qin Dong Liang Jul 9 '18 at 4:00
  • And I've updated for your second update. @QinDongLiang – markspace Jul 9 '18 at 4:05
  • I know how to write the right code, and now our goal is to discuss whether my code above is correct or accidental. You can test my code above and then how should you explain it. – Qin Dong Liang Jul 9 '18 at 4:08
  • I said in my reply that it is "accidental." That's the only reason it works. @QinDongLiang – markspace Jul 9 '18 at 4:09
  • 1
    1. happens before only applies to actions 2. as the answerer posted the previous 3 times, there are no happens before relationships whatsoever in your code 3. synchronizing on a string is almost totally useless and will probably be optimized away anyway so the question is moot in the first place – xTrollxDudex Jul 9 '18 at 5:58
1

Thanks to the information provided by @xTrollxDudex and @markspace ,The code in the loop section is observed from the jvm level, If there is no happens-before relationship and the code may be optimized from :

       while (flag){

        synchronized (lock){
            // some work
        }

    }

to :

      if(flag){

        while (true){

            synchronized (lock){
                //some work
            }

        }

    }

To ensure thread visibility, we need to avoid this optimization, such as through the volatile keyword or other synchronization strategies. The appearance of the sync block in the loop is similar to the function of the enhanced volatile keyword, which guarantees the visibility of the variable in front of it, so when we loop into the sync block for the second time, we can see it latest. The change, which is why the loop can stop normally. It looks fine, but it's not the right synchronization method, so don't do it.

For a detailed explanation, please see a similar question in here

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