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I've read a lot of answers about the %p format specifier usage in C language here in Stack Overflow, but none seems to give an explanation as to why explicit cast to void* is needed for all types but char*.
I'm of course aware about the fact that this requirement to cast to or from void* is tied with the use of variadic functions (see first comment of this answer) while non-mandatory otherwise.

Here's an example :

int i;    
printf ("%p", &i);

Yields a warning about type incompatibility and that &i shall be casted to void* (as required by the standard, see again here).

Whereas this chunk of code compiles smoothly with no complaint about type casting whatsoever:

char * m = "Hello";    
printf ("%p", m);

How does that come that char* is "relieved" from this imperative?

PS: It's maybe worth adding that I work on x86_64 architecture, as pointer type size depends on it, and using gcc as compiler on linux with -W -Wall -std=c11 -pedantic compiling options.

2
  • You can check that with clang 5.*, if you put a char * with %p, it shows the warning: warning: format specifies type 'void *' but the argument has type 'char *'. Commented Jul 9, 2018 at 8:35
  • @PaulAnkman You're totally right ! Just tried it out, and gives away the classical nasty warning about type incompatibility between void* and char*. How do you explain that ? Does clang not implement the c standard specification about the interchangeability of same-representation/same-alignment types, as pointed out by other answers ? Commented Jul 9, 2018 at 8:57

4 Answers 4

20

There is no explicit cast needed for arguments of type char*, as char * has the same representation and alignment requirement as void *.

Quoting C11, chapter §6.2.5

A pointer to void shall have the same representation and alignment requirements as a pointer to a character type. (48) [...]

and the footnote 48)

The same representation and alignment requirements are meant to imply interchangeability as arguments to functions, return values from functions, and members of unions.

11
  • Indeed, this supports this claim: stackoverflow.com/questions/43092033/…
    – gsamaras
    Commented Jul 9, 2018 at 8:10
  • 3
    @programmersn it is not just about explicit cast. The representation of the pointers in memory is also same. Commented Jul 9, 2018 at 8:20
  • 1
    @programmersn Some architectures have segmented or paged address space. E.G. XC167 has 10 bit page + 14 bit offset within a 24 bit address space. A normal pointer has page and offset in separeate 16 bit words. For some purpose a linear address format is also available. These are different representations while a pointer uses 4 bytes in both versions.
    – Gerhardh
    Commented Jul 9, 2018 at 8:57
  • 1
    @programmersn - Another exception is (was) systems with word addressed memory, where a char* might have to contain a part word indicator to extract a single character from a larger memory word.
    – Bo Persson
    Commented Jul 9, 2018 at 9:38
  • 1
    @programmersn: Stranger things exist; check this related question on some "funny" architectures where common assumptions no longer apply...
    – DevSolar
    Commented Jul 9, 2018 at 10:53
9

The C11 standard 6.2.5/28 says:

A pointer to void shall have the same representation and alignment requirements as a pointer to a character type. 48)

with footnote 48 being:

The same representation and alignment requirements are meant to imply interchangeability as arguments to functions, return values from functions, and members of unions.

However 7.21.6.1 ("The fprintf function") says about %p:

The argument shall be a pointer to void.


This is apparently a contradiction. In my opinion, a sensible interpretation is to say that the intent of 6.2.5/28 is that void * and char * are in fact interchangeable as the types for function arguments which do not correspond to a prototype. (i.e. arguments to non-prototyped functions, or matching the ellipsis of a prototype of variadic function).

Apparently the compiler you're using takes a similar view.

To back this up, the specification of argument types in 7.21.6.1, if taken literally without regard to intent, has a lot of other inconsistencies that have to be disregarded in practice (e.g. it says that printf("%lx", -1); is well-defined, but printf("%u", 1); is undefined behaviour).

2
  • You're the only one mentioning compiler interpretation of the standard. This is maybe why clang does complain about the discussed type incompatibility, while gcc doesn't. Commented Jul 9, 2018 at 11:17
  • @programmersn, conforming C implementations are not required to issue diagnostic messages about anything other than violations of language constraints, and the situation you describe does not contain any constraint violations. That one compiler issues a diagnostic and another doesn't has no more significance jointly than those two facts have individually. Commented Jul 9, 2018 at 16:08
5

The reason for this requirement is the C Standard allows for different representations for pointers to different types, with 2 notable constraints:

Hence on some architectures, int * and char * might have different representations, for example a different size, and they could be passed in different ways to vararg functions, causing int i = 1; printf("%p", &i); and int i = 1; printf("%p", (void*)&i); to behave differently.

Note however that the Posix standards mandate that all pointer type have the same size and representation. Hence on a Posix system printf("%p", &i); should behave as expected.

1
  • 1
    What are the types of i and p in your examples ? Commented Jul 9, 2018 at 10:31
3

From C Standard#6.2.5p28

A pointer to void shall have the same representation and alignment requirements as a pointer to a character type.48) Similarly, pointers to qualified or unqualified versions of compatible types shall have the same representation and alignment requirements. All pointers to structure types shall have the same representation and alignment requirements as each other. All pointers to union types shall have the same representation and alignment requirements as each other. Pointers to other types need not have the same representation or alignment requirements. [emphasis mine]

2
  • 1
    That's exactly the link I posted to Sourav's Ghosh answer (but probably you didn't see it). =)
    – gsamaras
    Commented Jul 9, 2018 at 8:11
  • Yes I did not, may be a few seconds difference in your comment and my answer.
    – H.S.
    Commented Jul 9, 2018 at 8:19

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