108

I have a 2D numpy array. Some of the values in this array are NaN. I want to perform certain operations using this array. For example consider the array:

[[   0.   43.   67.    0.   38.]
 [ 100.   86.   96.  100.   94.]
 [  76.   79.   83.   89.   56.]
 [  88.   NaN   67.   89.   81.]
 [  94.   79.   67.   89.   69.]
 [  88.   79.   58.   72.   63.]
 [  76.   79.   71.   67.   56.]
 [  71.   71.   NaN   56.  100.]]

I am trying to take each row, one at a time, sort it in reversed order to get max 3 values from the row and take their average. The code I tried is:

# nparr is a 2D numpy array
for entry in nparr:
    sortedentry = sorted(entry, reverse=True)
    highest_3_values = sortedentry[:3]
    avg_highest_3 = float(sum(highest_3_values)) / 3

This does not work for rows containing NaN. My question is, is there a quick way to convert all NaN values to zero in the 2D numpy array so that I have no problems with sorting and other things I am trying to do.

2
  • 1
    each: map: return isNaN(value) ? 0 : value
    – kirilloid
    Feb 26 '11 at 1:12
  • @kirilloid: sounds good, how about example usage?
    – serv-inc
    Jun 17 '16 at 15:08
156

Where A is your 2D array:

import numpy as np
A[np.isnan(A)] = 0

The function isnan produces a bool array indicating where the NaN values are. A boolean array can by used to index an array of the same shape. Think of it like a mask.

0
137

This should work:

from numpy import *

a = array([[1, 2, 3], [0, 3, NaN]])
where_are_NaNs = isnan(a)
a[where_are_NaNs] = 0

In the above case where_are_NaNs is:

In [12]: where_are_NaNs
Out[12]: 
array([[False, False, False],
       [False, False,  True]], dtype=bool)
0
46

How about nan_to_num()?

3
  • 11
    nan_to_num() also changes infinities - this might unwanted in some cases.
    – Agos
    May 10 '11 at 8:43
  • 13
    Its also >10x slow than the other methods.
    – user48956
    Jan 12 '18 at 20:05
  • 8
    I wasn't sure about tat ">10x slow" statement so I checked. Indeed, it is that much slower. Thanks for pointing this out.
    – Gabriel
    May 7 '18 at 15:05
21

You could use np.where to find where you have NaN:

import numpy as np

a = np.array([[   0,   43,   67,    0,   38],
              [ 100,   86,   96,  100,   94],
              [  76,   79,   83,   89,   56],
              [  88,   np.nan,   67,   89,   81],
              [  94,   79,   67,   89,   69],
              [  88,   79,   58,   72,   63],
              [  76,   79,   71,   67,   56],
              [  71,   71,   np.nan,   56,  100]])

b = np.where(np.isnan(a), 0, a)

In [20]: b
Out[20]: 
array([[   0.,   43.,   67.,    0.,   38.],
       [ 100.,   86.,   96.,  100.,   94.],
       [  76.,   79.,   83.,   89.,   56.],
       [  88.,    0.,   67.,   89.,   81.],
       [  94.,   79.,   67.,   89.,   69.],
       [  88.,   79.,   58.,   72.,   63.],
       [  76.,   79.,   71.,   67.,   56.],
       [  71.,   71.,    0.,   56.,  100.]])
2
  • 1
    as it is, it doesnt work, you need to change np.where(np.isnan(a), a, 0) to np.where(~np.isnan(a), a, 0). This might be a difference in versions used though.
    – TehTris
    Mar 1 '18 at 23:21
  • 1
    @TehTris you're right, thanks. I changed it to b = np.where(np.isnan(a), 0, a) which is more straightforward then with ~ as I think. Mar 2 '18 at 5:22
14

A code example for drake's answer to use nan_to_num:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> A = np.array([[1, 2, 3], [0, 3, np.NaN]])
>>> A = np.nan_to_num(A)
>>> A
array([[ 1.,  2.,  3.],
       [ 0.,  3.,  0.]])
3

You can use numpy.nan_to_num :

numpy.nan_to_num(x) : Replace nan with zero and inf with finite numbers.

Example (see doc) :

>>> np.set_printoptions(precision=8)
>>> x = np.array([np.inf, -np.inf, np.nan, -128, 128])
>>> np.nan_to_num(x)
array([  1.79769313e+308,  -1.79769313e+308,   0.00000000e+000,
        -1.28000000e+002,   1.28000000e+002])
1

nan is never equal to nan

if z!=z:z=0

so for a 2D array

for entry in nparr:
    if entry!=entry:entry=0
1
  • This does not work: entry is a 1D array, so the test entry != entry does not give a simple boolean but raises ValueError. Aug 5 '17 at 19:20
-1

You can use lambda function, an example for 1D array:

import numpy as np
a = [np.nan, 2, 3]
map(lambda v:0 if np.isnan(v) == True else v, a)

This will give you the result:

[0, 2, 3]
-8

For your purposes, if all the items are stored as str and you just use sorted as you are using and then check for the first element and replace it with '0'

>>> l1 = ['88','NaN','67','89','81']
>>> n = sorted(l1,reverse=True)
['NaN', '89', '88', '81', '67']
>>> import math
>>> if math.isnan(float(n[0])):
...     n[0] = '0'
... 
>>> n
['0', '89', '88', '81', '67']
3
  • 6
    Is not your comment bit harsh? I know what numpy is, but did know that array will not be string representation of numbers. I specifically did not give a take to this from numpy perspective but from python's perspective, if that was useful. Feb 26 '11 at 3:24
  • 2
    Re-ordering the array just sounds like a confusing way of solving this.
    – holografix
    Jun 21 '14 at 16:25
  • I need to preserve the order of my array. It won't work if you have multiple 'NaN' in your array.
    – 3nrique0
    Nov 12 '20 at 13:18

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.