I tried writing an algorithm to simplify a decimal to a fraction and realized it wasn't too simple. Surprisingly I looked online and all the codes I found where either too long, or wouldn't work in some cases. What was even more annoying was that they didn't work for recurring decimals. I was wondering however whether there would be a mathematician/programmer here who understands all the involved processes in simplifying a decimal to a fraction. Anyone?

  • You are trying to write 0.333333... as 1/3 for example? – Eelvex Feb 26 '11 at 2:58
  • yep! 1.666666666667 as 1/6 and so on.. – Chibueze Opata Feb 26 '11 at 3:04
  • 4
    @Jerry, I think he probably meant 0.1666667, which is 1/6. – Haldean Brown Feb 26 '11 at 3:30
  • @haldean: yeah thanks.. @jerry: it was a typo... – Chibueze Opata Feb 26 '11 at 4:05
  • I had something similar but I was only doing a subset of fractions. 1/16 through 15/16. I didn't allow 1/324 or anything that would generate 5+ decimal places. I simply made a Dictionary<string, decimal> and added each possible traction as a key and it's decimal equivalent. Then used linq to search the dictionary for the key who's decimal value was closest to the input decimal value. Again it only works for a small subset of fractions. When you get to the hundreths place, it loses accuracy. – Rafiki Sep 15 '16 at 14:44

21 Answers 21

The algorithm that the other people have given you gets the answer by calculating the Continued Fraction of the number. This gives a fractional sequence which is guaranteed to converge very, very rapidly. However it is not guaranteed to give you the smallest fraction that is within a distance epsilon of a real number. To find that you have to walk the Stern-Brocot tree.

To do that you subtract off the floor to get the number in the range [0, 1), then your lower estimate is 0, and your upper estimate is 1. Now do a binary search until you are close enough. At each iteration if your lower is a/b and your upper is c/d your middle is (a+c)/(b+d). Test your middle against x, and either make the middle the upper, the lower, or return your final answer.

Here is some very non-idiomatic (and hence, hopefully, readable even if you don't know the language) Python that implements this algorithm.

def float_to_fraction (x, error=0.000001):
    n = int(math.floor(x))
    x -= n
    if x < error:
        return (n, 1)
    elif 1 - error < x:
        return (n+1, 1)

    # The lower fraction is 0/1
    lower_n = 0
    lower_d = 1
    # The upper fraction is 1/1
    upper_n = 1
    upper_d = 1
    while True:
        # The middle fraction is (lower_n + upper_n) / (lower_d + upper_d)
        middle_n = lower_n + upper_n
        middle_d = lower_d + upper_d
        # If x + error < middle
        if middle_d * (x + error) < middle_n:
            # middle is our new upper
            upper_n = middle_n
            upper_d = middle_d
        # Else If middle < x - error
        elif middle_n < (x - error) * middle_d:
            # middle is our new lower
            lower_n = middle_n
            lower_d = middle_d
        # Else middle is our best fraction
        else:
            return (n * middle_d + middle_n, middle_d)
  • +1 - this is a great solution for finding smooth, human-friendly fractions. – Tim Medora Nov 19 '12 at 6:59
  • 3
    Translated this to C# and added test results for this algorithm -- see my answer – Kay Zed Oct 2 '15 at 9:01
  • I came up with another, apparently faster, solution – PinkFloyd Jun 1 '16 at 16:03
  • @PinkFloyd My solution already pointed out that there are faster ways of doing this. However it finds the smallest one. For example consider approximating pi to within 0.001. Mine will find 201/64 while yours will find 333/106. Yours will be much faster and is a much better approximation, but mine is the smallest that meets the chosen criteria. – btilly Jan 11 '17 at 18:31

(code improved Feb 2017 - scroll down to 'optimization'...)

(algorithm comparison table at the end of this answer)

I implemented btilly's answer in C# and...

  • added support for negative numbers
  • provide an accuracy parameter to specify the max. relative error, not the max. absolute error; 0.01 would find a fraction within 1% of the value.
  • provide an optimization
  • Double.NaN and Double.Infinity are not supported; you might want to handle those (example here).
public Fraction RealToFraction(double value, double accuracy)
{
    if (accuracy <= 0.0 || accuracy >= 1.0)
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("accuracy", "Must be > 0 and < 1.");
    }

    int sign = Math.Sign(value);

    if (sign == -1)
    {
        value = Math.Abs(value);
    }

    // Accuracy is the maximum relative error; convert to absolute maxError
    double maxError = sign == 0 ? accuracy : value * accuracy;

    int n = (int) Math.Floor(value);
    value -= n;

    if (value < maxError)
    {
        return new Fraction(sign * n, 1);
    }

    if (1 - maxError < value)
    {
        return new Fraction(sign * (n + 1), 1);
    }

    // The lower fraction is 0/1
    int lower_n = 0;
    int lower_d = 1;

    // The upper fraction is 1/1
    int upper_n = 1;
    int upper_d = 1;

    while (true)
    {
        // The middle fraction is (lower_n + upper_n) / (lower_d + upper_d)
        int middle_n = lower_n + upper_n;
        int middle_d = lower_d + upper_d;

        if (middle_d * (value + maxError) < middle_n)
        {
            // real + error < middle : middle is our new upper
            upper_n = middle_n;
            upper_d = middle_d;
        }
        else if (middle_n < (value - maxError) * middle_d)
        {
            // middle < real - error : middle is our new lower
            lower_n = middle_n;
            lower_d = middle_d;
        }
        else
        {
            // Middle is our best fraction
            return new Fraction((n * middle_d + middle_n) * sign, middle_d);
        }
    }
}

The Fraction type is just a simple struct. Of course, use your own preferred type... (I like this one by Rick Davin.)

public struct Fraction
{
    public Fraction(int n, int d)
    {
        N = n;
        D = d;
    }

    public int N { get; private set; }
    public int D { get; private set; }
}

Feb 2017 optimization

For certain values, like 0.01, 0.001, etc. the algorithm goes through hundreds or thousands of linear iterations. To fix this, I implemented a binary way of finding the final value -- thanks to btilly for this idea. Inside the if-statement substitute the following:

// real + error < middle : middle is our new upper
Seek(ref upper_n, ref upper_d, lower_n, lower_d, (un, ud) => (lower_d + ud) * (value + maxError) < (lower_n + un));

and

// middle < real - error : middle is our new lower
Seek(ref lower_n, ref lower_d, upper_n, upper_d, (ln, ld) => (ln + upper_n) < (value - maxError) * (ld + upper_d));

Here is the Seek method implementation:

/// <summary>
/// Binary seek for the value where f() becomes false.
/// </summary>
void Seek(ref int a, ref int b, int ainc, int binc, Func<int, int, bool> f)
{
    a += ainc;
    b += binc;

    if (f(a, b))
    {
        int weight = 1;

        do
        {
            weight *= 2;
            a += ainc * weight;
            b += binc * weight;
        }
        while (f(a, b));

        do
        {
            weight /= 2;

            int adec = ainc * weight;
            int bdec = binc * weight;

            if (!f(a - adec, b - bdec))
            {
                a -= adec;
                b -= bdec;
            }
        }
        while (weight > 1);
    }
}

Algorithm comparison table

You may want to copy the table to your text editor for full screen viewing.

Accuracy: 1.0E-3      | Stern-Brocot                             OPTIMIZED   | Eppstein                                 | Richards                                 
Input                 | Result           Error       Iterations  Iterations  | Result           Error       Iterations  | Result           Error       Iterations  
======================| =====================================================| =========================================| =========================================
   0                  |       0/1 (zero)   0         0           0           |       0/1 (zero)   0         0           |       0/1 (zero)   0         0           
   1                  |       1/1          0         0           0           |    1001/1000      1.0E-3     1           |       1/1          0         0           
   3                  |       3/1          0         0           0           |    1003/334       1.0E-3     1           |       3/1          0         0           
  -1                  |      -1/1          0         0           0           |   -1001/1000      1.0E-3     1           |      -1/1          0         0           
  -3                  |      -3/1          0         0           0           |   -1003/334       1.0E-3     1           |      -3/1          0         0           
   0.999999           |       1/1         1.0E-6     0           0           |    1000/1001     -1.0E-3     2           |       1/1         1.0E-6     0           
  -0.999999           |      -1/1         1.0E-6     0           0           |   -1000/1001     -1.0E-3     2           |      -1/1         1.0E-6     0           
   1.000001           |       1/1        -1.0E-6     0           0           |    1001/1000      1.0E-3     1           |       1/1        -1.0E-6     0           
  -1.000001           |      -1/1        -1.0E-6     0           0           |   -1001/1000      1.0E-3     1           |      -1/1        -1.0E-6     0           
   0.50 (1/2)         |       1/2          0         1           1           |     999/1999     -5.0E-4     2           |       1/2          0         1           
   0.33... (1/3)      |       1/3          0         2           2           |     999/2998     -3.3E-4     2           |       1/3          0         1           
   0.67... (2/3)      |       2/3          0         2           2           |     999/1498      3.3E-4     3           |       2/3          0         2           
   0.25 (1/4)         |       1/4          0         3           3           |     999/3997     -2.5E-4     2           |       1/4          0         1           
   0.11... (1/9)      |       1/9          0         8           4           |     999/8992     -1.1E-4     2           |       1/9          0         1           
   0.09... (1/11)     |       1/11         0         10          5           |     999/10990    -9.1E-5     2           |       1/11         0         1           
   0.62... (307/499)  |       8/13        2.5E-4     5           5           |     913/1484     -2.2E-6     8           |       8/13        2.5E-4     5           
   0.14... (33/229)   |      15/104       8.7E-4     20          9           |     974/6759     -4.5E-6     6           |      16/111       2.7E-4     3           
   0.05... (33/683)   |       7/145      -8.4E-4     24          10          |     980/20283     1.5E-6     7           |      10/207      -1.5E-4     4           
   0.18... (100/541)  |      17/92       -3.3E-4     11          10          |     939/5080     -2.0E-6     8           |      17/92       -3.3E-4     4           
   0.06... (33/541)   |       5/82       -3.7E-4     19          8           |     995/16312    -1.9E-6     6           |       5/82       -3.7E-4     4           
   0.1                |       1/10         0         9           5           |     999/9991     -1.0E-4     2           |       1/10         0         1           
   0.2                |       1/5          0         4           3           |     999/4996     -2.0E-4     2           |       1/5          0         1           
   0.3                |       3/10         0         5           5           |     998/3327     -1.0E-4     4           |       3/10         0         3           
   0.4                |       2/5          0         3           3           |     999/2497      2.0E-4     3           |       2/5          0         2           
   0.5                |       1/2          0         1           1           |     999/1999     -5.0E-4     2           |       1/2          0         1           
   0.6                |       3/5          0         3           3           |    1000/1667     -2.0E-4     4           |       3/5          0         3           
   0.7                |       7/10         0         5           5           |     996/1423     -1.0E-4     4           |       7/10         0         3           
   0.8                |       4/5          0         4           3           |     997/1246      2.0E-4     3           |       4/5          0         2           
   0.9                |       9/10         0         9           5           |     998/1109     -1.0E-4     4           |       9/10         0         3           
   0.01               |       1/100        0         99          8           |     999/99901    -1.0E-5     2           |       1/100        0         1           
   0.001              |       1/1000       0         999         11          |     999/999001   -1.0E-6     2           |       1/1000       0         1           
   0.0001             |       1/9991      9.0E-4     9990        15          |     999/9990001  -1.0E-7     2           |       1/10000      0         1           
   1E-05              |       1/99901     9.9E-4     99900       18          |    1000/99999999  1.0E-8     3           |       1/99999     1.0E-5     1           
   0.33333333333      |       1/3         1.0E-11    2           2           |    1000/3001     -3.3E-4     2           |       1/3         1.0E-11    1           
   0.3                |       3/10         0         5           5           |     998/3327     -1.0E-4     4           |       3/10         0         3           
   0.33               |      30/91       -1.0E-3     32          8           |     991/3003      1.0E-5     3           |      33/100        0         2           
   0.333              |     167/502      -9.9E-4     169         11          |    1000/3003      1.0E-6     3           |     333/1000       0         2           
   0.7777             |       7/9         1.0E-4     5           4           |     997/1282     -1.1E-5     4           |       7/9         1.0E-4     3           
   0.101              |      10/99        1.0E-4     18          10          |     919/9099      1.1E-6     5           |      10/99        1.0E-4     3           
   0.10001            |       1/10       -1.0E-4     9           5           |       1/10       -1.0E-4     4           |       1/10       -1.0E-4     2           
   0.100000001        |       1/10       -1.0E-8     9           5           |    1000/9999      1.0E-4     3           |       1/10       -1.0E-8     2           
   0.001001           |       1/999       1.0E-6     998         11          |       1/999       1.0E-6     3           |       1/999       1.0E-6     1           
   0.0010000001       |       1/1000     -1.0E-7     999         11          |    1000/999999    9.0E-7     3           |       1/1000     -1.0E-7     2           
   0.11               |      10/91       -1.0E-3     18          9           |    1000/9091     -1.0E-5     4           |      10/91       -1.0E-3     2           
   0.1111             |       1/9         1.0E-4     8           4           |    1000/9001     -1.1E-5     2           |       1/9         1.0E-4     1           
   0.111111111111     |       1/9         1.0E-12    8           4           |    1000/9001     -1.1E-4     2           |       1/9         1.0E-12    1           
   1                  |       1/1          0         0           0           |    1001/1000      1.0E-3     1           |       1/1          0         0           
  -1                  |      -1/1          0         0           0           |   -1001/1000      1.0E-3     1           |      -1/1          0         0           
  -0.5                |      -1/2          0         1           1           |    -999/1999     -5.0E-4     2           |      -1/2          0         1           
   3.14               |      22/7         9.1E-4     6           4           |     964/307       2.1E-5     3           |      22/7         9.1E-4     1           
   3.1416             |      22/7         4.0E-4     6           4           |     732/233       9.8E-6     3           |      22/7         4.0E-4     1           
   3.14... (pi)       |      22/7         4.0E-4     6           4           |     688/219      -1.3E-5     4           |      22/7         4.0E-4     1           
   0.14               |       7/50         0         13          7           |     995/7107      2.0E-5     3           |       7/50         0         2           
   0.1416             |      15/106      -6.4E-4     21          8           |     869/6137      9.2E-7     5           |      16/113      -5.0E-5     2           
   2.72... (e)        |      68/25        6.3E-4     7           7           |     878/323      -5.7E-6     8           |      87/32        1.7E-4     5           
   0.141592653589793  |      15/106      -5.9E-4     21          8           |     991/6999     -7.0E-6     4           |      15/106      -5.9E-4     2           
  -1.33333333333333   |      -4/3         2.5E-15    2           2           |   -1001/751      -3.3E-4     2           |      -4/3         2.5E-15    1           
  -1.3                |     -13/10         0         5           5           |    -992/763       1.0E-4     3           |     -13/10         0         2           
  -1.33               |     -97/73       -9.3E-4     26          8           |    -935/703       1.1E-5     3           |    -133/100        0         2           
  -1.333              |      -4/3         2.5E-4     2           2           |   -1001/751      -8.3E-5     2           |      -4/3         2.5E-4     1           
  -1.33333337         |      -4/3        -2.7E-8     2           2           |    -999/749       3.3E-4     3           |      -4/3        -2.7E-8     2           
  -1.7                |     -17/10         0         5           5           |    -991/583      -1.0E-4     4           |     -17/10         0         3           
  -1.37               |     -37/27        2.7E-4     7           7           |    -996/727       1.0E-5     7           |     -37/27        2.7E-4     5           
  -1.33337            |      -4/3        -2.7E-5     2           2           |    -999/749       3.1E-4     3           |      -4/3        -2.7E-5     2           
   0.047619           |       1/21        1.0E-6     20          6           |    1000/21001    -4.7E-5     2           |       1/21        1.0E-6     1           
  12.125              |      97/8          0         7           4           |     982/81       -1.3E-4     2           |      97/8          0         1           
   5.5                |      11/2          0         1           1           |     995/181      -5.0E-4     2           |      11/2          0         1           
   0.1233333333333    |       9/73       -3.7E-4     16          8           |     971/7873     -3.4E-6     4           |       9/73       -3.7E-4     2           
   0.7454545454545    |      38/51       -4.8E-4     15          8           |     981/1316     -1.9E-5     6           |      38/51       -4.8E-4     4           
   0.01024801004      |       2/195       8.2E-4     98          9           |     488/47619     2.0E-8     13          |       2/195       8.2E-4     3           
   0.99011            |      91/92       -9.9E-4     91          8           |     801/809       1.3E-6     5           |     100/101      -1.1E-5     2           
   0.9901134545       |      91/92       -9.9E-4     91          8           |     601/607       1.9E-6     5           |     100/101      -1.5E-5     2           
   0.19999999         |       1/5         5.0E-8     4           3           |    1000/5001     -2.0E-4     2           |       1/5         5.0E-8     1           
   0.20000001         |       1/5        -5.0E-8     4           3           |    1000/4999      2.0E-4     3           |       1/5        -5.0E-8     2           
   5.0183168565E-05   |       1/19908     9.5E-4     19907       16          |    1000/19927001 -5.0E-8     2           |       1/19927     5.2E-12    1           
   3.909E-07          |       1/2555644   1.0E-3     2555643     23          |       1/1         2.6E6 (!)  1           |       1/2558199   1.1E-8     1           
88900003.001          |88900003/1        -1.1E-11    0           0           |88900004/1         1.1E-8     1           |88900003/1        -1.1E-11    0           
   0.26... (5/19)     |       5/19         0         7           6           |     996/3785     -5.3E-5     4           |       5/19         0         3           
   0.61... (37/61)    |      17/28        9.7E-4     8           7           |     982/1619     -1.7E-5     8           |      17/28        9.7E-4     5           
                      |                                                      |                                          | 
Accuracy: 1.0E-4      | Stern-Brocot                             OPTIMIZED   | Eppstein                                 | Richards                                 
Input                 | Result           Error       Iterations  Iterations  | Result           Error       Iterations  | Result           Error       Iterations  
======================| =====================================================| =========================================| =========================================
   0.62... (307/499)  |     227/369      -8.8E-5     33          11          |    9816/15955    -2.0E-7     8           |     299/486      -6.7E-6     6           
   0.05... (33/683)   |      23/476       6.4E-5     27          12          |    9989/206742    1.5E-7     7           |      23/476       6.4E-5     5           
   0.06... (33/541)   |      28/459       6.6E-5     24          12          |    9971/163464   -1.9E-7     6           |      33/541        0         5           
   1E-05              |       1/99991     9.0E-5     99990       18          |   10000/999999999 1.0E-9     3           |       1/99999     1.0E-5     1           
   0.333              |     303/910      -9.9E-5     305         12          |    9991/30003     1.0E-7     3           |     333/1000       0         2           
   0.7777             |     556/715      -1.0E-4     84          12          |    7777/10000      0         8           |    1109/1426     -1.8E-7     4           
   3.14... (pi)       |     289/92       -9.2E-5     19          8           |    9918/3157     -8.1E-7     4           |     333/106      -2.6E-5     2           
   2.72... (e)        |     193/71        1.0E-5     10          9           |    9620/3539      6.3E-8     11          |     193/71        1.0E-5     7           
   0.7454545454545    |      41/55        6.1E-14    16          8           |    9960/13361    -1.8E-6     6           |      41/55        6.1E-14    5           
   0.01024801004      |       7/683       8.7E-5     101         12          |    9253/902907   -1.3E-10    16          |       7/683       8.7E-5     5           
   0.99011            |     100/101      -1.1E-5     100         8           |     901/910      -1.1E-7     6           |     100/101      -1.1E-5     2           
   0.9901134545       |     100/101      -1.5E-5     100         8           |    8813/8901      1.6E-8     7           |     100/101      -1.5E-5     2           
   0.26... (5/19)     |       5/19         0         7           6           |    9996/37985    -5.3E-6     4           |       5/19         0         3           
   0.61... (37/61)    |      37/61         0         10          8           |    9973/16442    -1.6E-6     8           |      37/61         0         7           

Performance comparison

I performed detailed speed tests and plotted the results. Not looking at quality and only speed:

  • The Stern-Brocot optimization slows it down by at most a factor 2, but the original Stern-Brocot can be hundreds or thousands times slower when it hits the unlucky values mentioned. That's still only a couple of microseconds though per call.
  • Richards is consistently fast.
  • Eppstein is around 3 times slower than the others.

Stern-Brocot and Richards compared:

  • Both return nice fractions.
  • Richards often results in a smaller error. It is also a bit faster.
  • Stern-Brocot walks down the S-B tree. It finds the fraction of the lowest denominator that meets the required accuracy, then stops.

If you do not require the lowest denominator fraction, Richards is a good choice.

  • The reason why the number of iterations gets large is because to get to 1/100 you are trying 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, ... Instead once you start going down one side of the tree you can do a binary search through not changing that side. This will give you 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, 1/64, 1/128, 1/96, 1/112, 1/104, 1/100. MUCH better. I didn't implement that trick in my answer because I was trying to explain, not optimize. – btilly Jan 6 '16 at 18:48
  • @btilly I know you answered this question a long time ago but I would like to know I you can point where I can find information of this optimization. I don't understand what you mean and I can't find information. Maybe if you could update your answer with a link or a more detailed description – PinkFloyd Jun 1 '16 at 13:50

I know you said you searched online, but if you missed the following paper it might be of some help. It includes a code example in Pascal.

Algorithm To Convert A Decimal To A Fraction*

Alternatively, as part of it's standard library, Ruby has code that deals with rational numbers. It can convert from floats to rationals and vice versa. I believe you can look through the code as well. The documentation is found here. I know you're not using Ruby, but it might help to look at the algorithms.

Additionally, you can call Ruby code from C# (or even write Ruby code inside a C# code file) if you use IronRuby, which runs on top of the .net framework.

*Updated to a new link as it appears the original URL is broken (http://homepage.smc.edu/kennedy_john/DEC2FRAC.pdf)

  • This is really a great article, and I think that's what most are using, but it happens the person who I downloaded his code (translated the code to c#) didn't to it well. I'll test it now, :) – Chibueze Opata Feb 26 '11 at 3:31
  • The link leads to an error page. – Daniel Feb 26 '13 at 10:28
  • @Daniel: Try it now. – Matt Feb 26 '13 at 20:59
  • @Matt It works, thanks! – Daniel Feb 26 '13 at 22:13
  • Link is dead. 404, again (found another at https:// sites.google.com/site/johnkennedyshome/home/downloadable-papers/dec2frac.pdf) – Denys Vitali Nov 11 '16 at 13:35

I found the same paper that Matt referenced, and I took a second and implemented it in Python. Maybe seeing the same idea in code will make it clearer. Granted, you requested an answer in C# and I'm giving it to you in Python, but it's a fairly trivial program, and I'm sure it would be easy to translate. The parameters are num (the decimal number you'd like to convert to a rational) and epsilon (the maximum allowed difference between num and the calculated rational). Some quick test runs find that it usually only takes two or three iterations to converge when epsilon is around 1e-4.

def dec2frac(num, epsilon, max_iter=20):
    d = [0, 1] + ([0] * max_iter)
    z = num
    n = 1
    t = 1

    while num and t < max_iter and abs(n/d[t] - num) > epsilon:
        t += 1
        z = 1/(z - int(z))
        d[t] = d[t-1] * int(z) + d[t-2]
        # int(x + 0.5) is equivalent to rounding x.
        n = int(num * d[t] + 0.5)

    return n, d[t]

Edit: I just noticed your note about wanting them to work with recurring decimals. I don't know any languages that have syntax to support recurring decimals, so I'm not sure how one would go about handling them, but running 0.6666666 and 0.166666 through this method return the correct results (2/3 and 1/6, respectively).

Another Edit (I didn't think this would be so interesting!): If you want to know more about the theory behind this algorithm, Wikipedia has an excellent page on the Euclidian algorithm

  • 2
    You don't need an array, btw; I posted an answer somewhere on SO once expressing the same algorithm as a Python generator (which avoids the need for epsilon and max_iter in the core logic as well). – Darius Bacon Feb 26 '11 at 20:31
  • Ah, here: stackoverflow.com/questions/445113/… – Darius Bacon Feb 26 '11 at 20:48
  • Yeah, initially I just did with with d0 and d1, but was less readable so I went with the list instead. Also, max_iter and epsilon just get moved elsewhere if you take them out, and I think it would be more convenient for an API user to do the whole thing in a single function call, rather than require the caller to do the iteration themselves. – Haldean Brown Mar 1 '11 at 4:50

You can't represent a recurring decimal in .net so I'll ignore that part of your question.

You can only represent a finite and relatively small number of digits.

There's an extremely simple algorithm:

  • take decimal x
  • count the number of digits after the decimal point; call this n
  • create a fraction (10^n * x) / 10^n
  • remove common factors from the numerator and denominator.

so if you have 0.44, you would count 2 places are the decimal point - n = 2, and then write

  • (0.44 * 10^2) / 10^2
  • = 44 / 100
  • factorising (removing common factor of 4) gives 11 / 25
  • nice, but you can detect if a decimal is recurring in .net right? I have already tried something like this and this is not what I want. Also, do you know the best way to find and remove the common factors? – Chibueze Opata Feb 26 '11 at 3:17
  • It's irrelevant whether you can detect if a decimal is recurring, because you cannot have recurring decimals. It is simply not possible for a decimal type to be recurring. – Kirk Broadhurst Feb 26 '11 at 3:41
  • hmm. seems I will be needing more mass tuts :o what exactly are you trying to tell me?? – Chibueze Opata Feb 26 '11 at 4:07
  • 2
    You're using .net, in which the decimal type can have less than 30 digits. It cannot have infinite digits. It has no way to represent 'recurring' patterns. You can have 0.333333333333333333 but you cannot have 0.3* (recurring) - and they are not the same thing. 0.3* is 1/3, but the former is 33333333(etc)/1000000 - slightly less than 1/3. – Kirk Broadhurst Feb 26 '11 at 4:57
  • 2
    The machine can only know what you tell it - so if you want to define some rules to 'round' clumsy 20 digit fraction to a nice fraction you could: if there are more than 10 digits, and there's a 1 or 2 digit fraction that is within 0.1% or some other margin then round it off. But it's up to you to determine those rules. The fact remains that 0.33333333333333333333 is not the same as 1/3. – Kirk Broadhurst Feb 28 '11 at 0:41

Here's a C# version of Will Brown's python example. I've also changed it to handle separate whole numbers (e.g. "2 1/8" instead of "17/8").

    public static string DoubleToFraction(double num, double epsilon = 0.0001, int maxIterations = 20)
    {
        double[] d = new double[maxIterations + 2];
        d[1] = 1;
        double z = num;
        double n = 1;
        int t = 1;

        int wholeNumberPart = (int)num;
        double decimalNumberPart = num - Convert.ToDouble(wholeNumberPart);

        while (t < maxIterations && Math.Abs(n / d[t] - num) > epsilon)
        {
            t++;
            z = 1 / (z - (int)z);
            d[t] = d[t - 1] * (int)z + d[t - 2];
            n = (int)(decimalNumberPart * d[t] + 0.5);
        }

        return string.Format((wholeNumberPart > 0 ? wholeNumberPart.ToString() + " " : "") + "{0}/{1}",
                             n.ToString(),
                             d[t].ToString()
                            );
    }

I wrote a quick class that runs fairly quick and gives the results I would expect. You can choose your Precision as well. It is much simpler from any code I seen and runs quick as well.

//Written By Brian Dobony
public static class Fraction
{
    public static string ConvertDecimal(Double NumberToConvert, int DenominatorPercision = 32)
    {
        int WholeNumber = (int)NumberToConvert;
        double DecimalValue = NumberToConvert - WholeNumber;

        double difference = 1;
        int numerator = 1;
        int denominator = 1;

        // find closest value that matches percision
        // Automatically finds Fraction in simplified form
        for (int y = 2; y < DenominatorPercision + 1; y++)
        {
                for (int x = 1; x < y; x++)
                {
                    double tempdif = Math.Abs(DecimalValue - (double)x / (double)y);
                    if (tempdif < difference)
                    {
                        numerator = x;
                        denominator = y;
                        difference = tempdif;
                        // if exact match is found return it
                        if (difference == 0)
                        {
                            return FractionBuilder(WholeNumber, numerator, denominator);
                        }
                    }
                }
        }
        return FractionBuilder(WholeNumber, numerator, denominator);
    }

    private static string FractionBuilder(int WholeNumber, int Numerator, int Denominator)
    {
        if (WholeNumber == 0)
        {
            return Numerator + @"/" + Denominator;
        }
        else
        {
            return WholeNumber + " " + Numerator + @"/" + Denominator;
        }
    }
}
  • I tried the program, it is good for 'seamingly' repeating decimals, but it did not work as I expected for some fractions, for example: when I used the value: 0.068376968, with 32 precision, the result was 2/29 =.068965517, which is good for only 4 digits behind the decimal. However, it is OK for me. – NoChance Apr 11 '16 at 19:36

This is the C# version of the algorithm by Ian Richards / John Kennedy. Other answers here using this same algorithm:

It does not handle infinities and NaN.

This algorithm is fast.

For example values and a comparison with other algorithms, see my other answer

public Fraction RealToFraction(double value, double accuracy)
{
    if (accuracy <= 0.0 || accuracy >= 1.0)
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("accuracy", "Must be > 0 and < 1.");
    }

    int sign = Math.Sign(value);

    if (sign == -1)
    {
        value = Math.Abs(value);
    }

    // Accuracy is the maximum relative error; convert to absolute maxError
    double maxError = sign == 0 ? accuracy : value * accuracy;

    int n = (int) Math.Floor(value);
    value -= n;

    if (value < maxError)
    {
        return new Fraction(sign * n, 1);
    }

    if (1 - maxError < value)
    {
        return new Fraction(sign * (n + 1), 1);
    }

    double z = value;
    int previousDenominator = 0;
    int denominator = 1;
    int numerator;

    do
    {
        z = 1.0 / (z - (int) z);
        int temp = denominator;
        denominator = denominator * (int) z + previousDenominator;
        previousDenominator = temp;
        numerator = Convert.ToInt32(value * denominator);
    }
    while (Math.Abs(value - (double) numerator / denominator) > maxError && z != (int) z);

    return new Fraction((n * denominator + numerator) * sign, denominator);
}

I come up with a very late answer. The code is taken from an article from Richards published in 1981 and written in c.

inline unsigned int richards_solution(double const& x0, unsigned long long& num, unsigned long long& den, double& sign, double const& err = 1e-10){
    sign = my::sign(x0);
    double g(std::abs(x0));
    unsigned long long a(0);
    unsigned long long b(1);
    unsigned long long c(1);
    unsigned long long d(0);
    unsigned long long s;
    unsigned int iter(0);
    do {
        s = std::floor(g);
        num = a + s*c;
        den = b + s*d;
        a = c;
        b = d;
        c = num;
        d = den;
        g = 1.0/(g-s);
        if(err>std::abs(sign*num/den-x0)){ return iter; }
    } while(iter++<1e6);
    std::cerr<<__PRETTY_FUNCTION__<<" : failed to find a fraction for "<<x0<<std::endl;
    return 0;
}

I rewrite here my implementation of btilly_solution :

inline unsigned int btilly_solution(double x, unsigned long long& num, unsigned long long& den, double& sign, double const& err = 1e-10){
    sign = my::sign(x);
    num  = std::floor(std::abs(x));
    x = std::abs(x)-num;
    unsigned long long lower_n(0);
    unsigned long long lower_d(1);
    unsigned long long upper_n(1);
    unsigned long long upper_d(1);
    unsigned long long middle_n;
    unsigned long long middle_d;
    unsigned int iter(0);
    do {
        middle_n = lower_n + upper_n;
        middle_d = lower_d + upper_d;
        if(middle_d*(x+err)<middle_n){
            upper_n = middle_n;
            upper_d = middle_d;
        } else if(middle_d*(x-err)>middle_n) {
            lower_n = middle_n;
            lower_d = middle_d;
        } else {
            num = num*middle_d+middle_n;
            den = middle_d;
            return iter;
        }
    } while(iter++<1e6);
    den = 1;
    std::cerr<<__PRETTY_FUNCTION__<<" : failed to find a fraction for "<<x+num<<std::endl;
    return 0;
}

And here I propose some tests with an error of 1e-10 :

------------------------------------------------------ |
btilly  0.166667 0.166667=1/6 in 5 iterations          | 1/6
richard 0.166667 0.166667=1/6 in 1 iterations          |
------------------------------------------------------ |
btilly  0.333333 0.333333=1/3 in 2 iterations          | 1/3
richard 0.333333 0.333333=1/3 in 1 iterations          |
------------------------------------------------------ |
btilly  0.142857 0.142857=1/7 in 6 iterations          | 1/7
richard 0.142857 0.142857=1/7 in 1 iterations          |
------------------------------------------------------ |
btilly  0.714286 0.714286=5/7 in 4 iterations          | 5/7
richard 0.714286 0.714286=5/7 in 4 iterations          |
------------------------------------------------------ |
btilly  1e-07 1.001e-07=1/9990010 in 9990009 iteration | 0.0000001
richard 1e-07 1e-07=1/10000000 in 1 iterations         |
------------------------------------------------------ |
btilly  3.66667 3.66667=11/3 in 2 iterations           | 11/3
richard 3.66667 3.66667=11/3 in 3 iterations           |
------------------------------------------------------ |
btilly  1.41421 1.41421=114243/80782 in 25 iterations  | sqrt(2)
richard 1.41421 1.41421=114243/80782 in 13 iterations  |
------------------------------------------------------ |
btilly  3.14159 3.14159=312689/99532 in 317 iterations | pi
richard 3.14159 3.14159=312689/99532 in 7 iterations   |
------------------------------------------------------ |
btilly  2.71828 2.71828=419314/154257 in 36 iterations | e
richard 2.71828 2.71828=517656/190435 in 14 iterations |
------------------------------------------------------ |
btilly  0.390885 0.390885=38236/97819 in 60 iterations | random
richard 0.390885 0.390885=38236/97819 in 13 iterations |

As you can see, the two methods give more or less the same results but the richards' one is way more efficient and easier to implement.

Edit

To compile my code you need a difinition for my::sign which is simply a function that returns the sign of a variable. Here is my implementation

 namespace my{
    template<typename Type> inline constexpr
        int sign_unsigned(Type x){ return Type(0)<x; }

    template<typename Type> inline constexpr
        int sign_signed(Type x){ return (Type(0)<x)-(x<Type(0)); }

    template<typename Type> inline constexpr
        int sign(Type x) { return std::is_signed<Type>()?sign_signed(x):sign_unsigned(x); }
 }

Sorry

I guess this answer refers to the same algorithm. I didn't see that before...

This algorithm by David Eppstein, UC Irvine, based on the theory of continued fractions and originally in C, was translated to C# by me. The fractions it generates satisfy the error margin but mostly do not look as good as the solutions in my other answers. E.g. 0.5 becomes 999/1999 while 1/2 would be preferred when displayed to a user (if you need that, see my other answers).

There is an overload to specify the error margin as a double (relative to the value, not the absolute error). For the Fraction type, see my other answer.

By the way, if your fractions can get large, change the relevant ints to long. Compared to the other algorithms this one is prone to overflow.

For example values and a comparison with other algorithms, see my other answer

public Fraction RealToFraction(double value, int maxDenominator)
{
    // http://www.ics.uci.edu/~eppstein/numth/frap.c
    // Find rational approximation to given real number
    // David Eppstein / UC Irvine / 8 Aug 1993
    // With corrections from Arno Formella, May 2008

    if (value == 0.0)
    {
        return new Fraction(0, 1);
    }

    int sign = Math.Sign(value);

    if (sign == -1)
    {
        value = Math.Abs(value);
    }

    int[,] m = { { 1, 0 }, { 0, 1 } };
    int ai = (int) value;

    // Find terms until denominator gets too big
    while (m[1, 0] * ai + m[1, 1] <= maxDenominator)
    {
        int t = m[0, 0] * ai + m[0, 1];
        m[0, 1] = m[0, 0];
        m[0, 0] = t;
        t = m[1, 0] * ai + m[1, 1];
        m[1, 1] = m[1, 0];
        m[1, 0] = t;

        value = 1.0 / (value - ai);

        // 0x7FFFFFFF = Assumes 32 bit floating point just like in the C implementation.
        // This check includes Double.IsInfinity(). Even though C# double is 64 bits,
        // the algorithm sometimes fails when trying to increase this value too much. So
        // I kept it. Anyway, it works.
        if (value > 0x7FFFFFFF)
        {                    
            break;
        }

        ai = (int) value;
    }

    // Two approximations are calculated: one on each side of the input
    // The result of the first one is the current value. Below the other one
    // is calculated and it is returned.

    ai = (maxDenominator - m[1, 1]) / m[1, 0];
    m[0, 0] = m[0, 0] * ai + m[0, 1];
    m[1, 0] = m[1, 0] * ai + m[1, 1];

    return new Fraction(sign * m[0, 0], m[1, 0]);
}

public Fraction RealToFraction(double value, double accuracy)
{
    if (accuracy <= 0.0 || accuracy >= 1.0)
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("accuracy", "Must be > 0 and < 1.");
    }

    int maxDenominator = (int) Math.Ceiling(Math.Abs(1.0 / (value * accuracy)));

    if (maxDenominator < 1)
    {
        maxDenominator = 1;
    }

    return RealToFraction(value, maxDenominator);
}

A recurring decimal can be represented by two finite decimals: the leftward part before the repeat, and the repeating part. E.g. 1.6181818... = 1.6 + 0.1*(0.18...). Think of this as a + b * sum(c * 10**-(d*k) for k in range(1, infinity)) (in Python notation here). In my example, a=1.6, b=0.1, c=18, d=2 (the number of digits in c). The infinite sum can be simplified (sum(r**k for r in range(1, infinity)) == r / (1 - r) if I recall rightly), yielding a + b * (c * 10**-d) / (1 - c * 10**-d)), a finite ratio. That is, start with a, b, c, and d as rational numbers, and you end up with another.

(This elaborates Kirk Broadhurst's answer, which is right as far as it goes, but doesn't cover repeating decimals. I don't promise I made no mistakes above, though I'm confident the general approach works.)

I recently had to perform this very task of working with a Decimal Data Type which is stored in our SQL Server database. At the Presentation Layer this value was edited as a fractional value in a TextBox. The complexity here was working with the Decimal Data Type which holds some pretty large values in comparison to int or long. So to reduce the opportunity for data overrun, I stuck with the Decimal Data Type throughout the conversion.

Before I begin, I want to comment on Kirk's previous answer. He is absolutely correct as long as there are no assumptions made. However, if the developer only looks for repeating patterns within the confines of the Decimal Data Type .3333333... can be represented as 1/3. An example of the algorithm can be found at basic-mathematics.com. Again, this means you have to make assumptions based on the information available and using this method only captures a very small subset of repeating decimals. However for small numbers should be okay.

Moving forward, let me give you a snapshot of my solution. If you want to read a complete example with additional code I created a blog post with much more detail.

Convert Decimal Data Type to a String Fraction

public static void DecimalToFraction(decimal value, ref decimal sign, ref decimal numerator, ref decimal denominator)
{
    const decimal maxValue = decimal.MaxValue / 10.0M;

    // e.g. .25/1 = (.25 * 100)/(1 * 100) = 25/100 = 1/4
    var tmpSign = value < decimal.Zero ? -1 : 1;
    var tmpNumerator = Math.Abs(value);
    var tmpDenominator = decimal.One;

    // While numerator has a decimal value
    while ((tmpNumerator - Math.Truncate(tmpNumerator)) > 0 && 
        tmpNumerator < maxValue && tmpDenominator < maxValue)
    {
        tmpNumerator = tmpNumerator * 10;
        tmpDenominator = tmpDenominator * 10;
    }

    tmpNumerator = Math.Truncate(tmpNumerator); // Just in case maxValue boundary was reached.
    ReduceFraction(ref tmpNumerator, ref tmpDenominator);
    sign = tmpSign;
    numerator = tmpNumerator;
    denominator = tmpDenominator;
}

public static string DecimalToFraction(decimal value)
{
    var sign = decimal.One;
    var numerator = decimal.One;
    var denominator = decimal.One;
    DecimalToFraction(value, ref sign, ref numerator, ref denominator);
    return string.Format("{0}/{1}", (sign * numerator).ToString().TruncateDecimal(), 
        denominator.ToString().TruncateDecimal());
}

This is pretty straight forward where the DecimalToFraction(decimal value) is nothing more than a simplified entry point for the first method which provides access to all the components which compose a fraction. If you have a decimal of .325 then divide it by 10 to the power of number of decimal places. Lastly reduce the fraction. And, in this example .325 = 325/10^3 = 325/1000 = 13/40.

Next, going the other direction.

Convert String Fraction to Decimal Data Type

static readonly Regex FractionalExpression = new Regex(@"^(?<sign>[-])?(?<numerator>\d+)(/(?<denominator>\d+))?$");
public static decimal? FractionToDecimal(string fraction)
{
    var match = FractionalExpression.Match(fraction);
    if (match.Success)
    {
        // var sign = Int32.Parse(match.Groups["sign"].Value + "1");
        var numerator = Int32.Parse(match.Groups["sign"].Value + match.Groups["numerator"].Value);
        int denominator;
        if (Int32.TryParse(match.Groups["denominator"].Value, out denominator))
            return denominator == 0 ? (decimal?)null : (decimal)numerator / denominator;
        if (numerator == 0 || numerator == 1)
            return numerator;
    }
    return null;
}

Converting back to a decimal is quite simple as well. Here we parse out the fractional components, store them in something we can work with (here decimal values) and perform our division.

My 2 cents. Here's VB.NET version of btilly's excellent algorithm:

   Public Shared Sub float_to_fraction(x As Decimal, ByRef Numerator As Long, ByRef Denom As Long, Optional ErrMargin As Decimal = 0.001)
    Dim n As Long = Int(Math.Floor(x))
    x -= n

    If x < ErrMargin Then
        Numerator = n
        Denom = 1
        Return
    ElseIf x >= 1 - ErrMargin Then
        Numerator = n + 1
        Denom = 1
        Return
    End If

    ' The lower fraction is 0/1
    Dim lower_n As Integer = 0
    Dim lower_d As Integer = 1
    ' The upper fraction is 1/1
    Dim upper_n As Integer = 1
    Dim upper_d As Integer = 1

    Dim middle_n, middle_d As Decimal
    While True
        ' The middle fraction is (lower_n + upper_n) / (lower_d + upper_d)
        middle_n = lower_n + upper_n
        middle_d = lower_d + upper_d
        ' If x + error < middle
        If middle_d * (x + ErrMargin) < middle_n Then
            ' middle is our new upper
            upper_n = middle_n
            upper_d = middle_d
            ' Else If middle < x - error
        ElseIf middle_n < (x - ErrMargin) * middle_d Then
            ' middle is our new lower
            lower_n = middle_n
            lower_d = middle_d
            ' Else middle is our best fraction
        Else
            Numerator = n * middle_d + middle_n
            Denom = middle_d
            Return
        End If
    End While
End Sub

Well, seems I finally had to do it myself. I just had to create a program simulating the natural way I would solve it myself. I just submitted the code to codeproject as writing out the whole code here won't be suitable. You can download the project from here Fraction_Conversion, or look at the codeproject page here.

Here's how it works:

  1. Find out whether given decimal is negative
  2. Convert decimal to absolute value
  3. Get integer part of given decimal
  4. Get the decimal part
  5. Check whether decimal is recurring. If decimal is recurring, we then return the exact recurring decimal
  6. If decimal is not recurring, start reduction by changing numerator to 10^no. of decimal, else we subtract 1 from numerator
  7. Then reduce fraction

Code Preview:

    private static string dec2frac(double dbl)
    {
        char neg = ' ';
        double dblDecimal = dbl;
        if (dblDecimal == (int) dblDecimal) return dblDecimal.ToString(); //return no if it's not a decimal
        if (dblDecimal < 0)
        {
            dblDecimal = Math.Abs(dblDecimal);
            neg = '-';
        }
        var whole = (int) Math.Truncate(dblDecimal);
        string decpart = dblDecimal.ToString().Replace(Math.Truncate(dblDecimal) + ".", "");
        double rN = Convert.ToDouble(decpart);
        double rD = Math.Pow(10, decpart.Length);

        string rd = recur(decpart);
        int rel = Convert.ToInt32(rd);
        if (rel != 0)
        {
            rN = rel;
            rD = (int) Math.Pow(10, rd.Length) - 1;
        }
        //just a few prime factors for testing purposes
        var primes = new[] {41, 43, 37, 31, 29, 23, 19, 17, 13, 11, 7, 5, 3, 2};
        foreach (int i in primes) reduceNo(i, ref rD, ref rN);

        rN = rN + (whole*rD);
        return string.Format("{0}{1}/{2}", neg, rN, rD);
    }

Thanks @ Darius for given me an idea of how to solve the recurring decimals :)

  • What will you do with fractions that have recurring decimals that do not recur within a period that fits in floating point? That happens even with fairly modest fractions. – btilly Jun 13 '13 at 19:42
  • @btilly: This was a long time ago, and was just a fairly simple approach to the issue as well as the best acceptable solution then. A better solution would be to use the BigInteger class. It worked with all fractions I tested with though, maybe you could try it out yourself with such fractions as you suggest. – Chibueze Opata Jun 13 '13 at 20:32
  • I disagree about "best acceptable solution" when my solution was posted before yours, is shorter, was upvoted more, handles fractions that yours does not, and provably comes up with the best possible fraction in all cases while yours does not. I'm not sure what definition of "best" you're using. – btilly Jun 13 '13 at 22:02
  • I did appreciate your solution, but it was not in C#, neither was any other. If Jeremy's solution was available then, I would have accepted it. – Chibueze Opata Jun 13 '13 at 22:23

The most populair solutions to this problem are Richards’ algorithm and the Stern-Brocot algorithm, implemented by btilly with speed optimalization by btilly and Jay Zed. Richards’ algorithm is the fastest, but does not guarantee to return the best fraction.

I have an solution to this problem which always gives the best fraction and is also faster than all of the algorithms above. Here is the algorithm in C# (explanation and speed test below).

This is a short algorithm without comments. An complete version is provided in the source code at the end.

public static Fraction DoubleToFractionSjaak(double value, double accuracy)
{
    int sign = value < 0 ? -1 : 1;
    value = value < 0 ? -value : value;
    int integerpart = (int)value;
    value -=  integerpart;
    double minimalvalue = value - accuracy;
    if (minimalvalue < 0.0) return new Fraction(sign * integerpart, 1);
    double maximumvalue = value + accuracy;
    if (maximumvalue > 1.0) return new Fraction(sign * (integerpart + 1), 1);
    int a = 0;
    int b = 1;
    int c = 1;
    int d = (int)(1 / maximumvalue);
    while (true)
    {
        int n = (int)((b * minimalvalue - a) / (c - d * minimalvalue));
        if (n == 0) break;
        a += n * c;
        b += n * d;
        n = (int)((c - d * maximumvalue) / (b * maximumvalue - a));
        if (n == 0) break;
        c += n * a;
        d += n * b;
    }
    int denominator = b + d;
    return new Fraction(sign * (integerpart * denominator + (a + c)), denominator);
}

Where Fraction is a simple class to store a fraction, like the following:

public class Fraction
{
    public int Numerator { get; private set; }
    public int Denominator { get; private set; }

    public Fraction(int numerator, int denominator)
    {
        Numerator = numerator;
        Denominator = denominator;
    }     
}

How it works

Like the other solutions mentioned, my solution is based on continued fraction. Other solutions like the one from Eppstein or solutions based on repeating decimals proved to be slower and/or give suboptimal results.

Continued fraction
Solutions based on continued fraction are mostly based on two algorithms, both described in an article by Ian Richards published here in 1981. He called them the “slow continued fraction algorithm” and the “fast continued fraction algorithm”. The first is known as the the Stern-Brocot algorithm while the latter is known as Richards’ algorithm.

My algorithm (short explanation)
To fully understand my algorithm, you need to have read the article by Ian Richards or at least understand what a Farey pair is. Furthermore, read the algorithm with comments at the end of this article.

The algorithm is using a Farey pair, containing a left and a right fraction. By repeatedly taking the mediant it is closing in on the target value. This is just like the slow algorithm but there are two major differences:

  1. Multiple iterations are performed at once as long as the mediant stay on one side of the target value.
  2. The left and right fraction cannot come closer to the target value than the given accuracy.

Alternately the right and left side of the target value are checked. If the algorithm cannot produce a result closer to the target value, the process ends. The resulting mediant is the optimal solution.

Speed test

I did some speed tests on my laptop with the following algorithms:

  1. Improved slow algorithm by Kay Zed and btilly
  2. John Kennedy’s implementation of the Fast algorithm, converted to C# by Kay Zed
  3. My implementation of the Fast algorithm (close to the original by Ian Richards)
  4. Jeremy Herrman’s implementation of the Fast algorithm
  5. My algorithm above

I omitted the original slow algorithm by btilly, because of its bad worst-case performance.

Test set
I choose a set of target values (very arbitrary) and calculated the fraction 100000 times with 5 different accuracies. Because possible some (future) algorithms couldn't handle improper fractions, only target values from 0.0 to 1.0 were tested. The accuracy was taken from the range from 2 to 6 decimal places (0.005 to 0.0000005). The following set was used:

0.999999, 0.000001, 0.25
0.33, 0.333, 0.3333, 0.33333, 0.333333, 0.333333333333, 
0.666666666666, 0.777777777777, 0.090909090909, 0.263157894737,
0.606557377049, 0.745454545454, 0.000050183168565,
pi - 3, e - 2.0, sqrt(2) - 1

Results

I did 13 test runs. The result is in milliseconds needed for the whole data set.

    Run 1   Run 2   Run 3   Run 4   Run 5   Run 6   Run 7   Run 8   Run 9   Run 10  Run 11  Run 12  Run 13
1.  9091    9222    9070    9111    9091    9108    9293    9118    9115    9113    9102    9143    9121
2.  7071    7125    7077    6987    7126    6985    7037    6964    7023    6980    7053    7050    6999
3.  6903    7059    7062    6891    6942    6880    6882    6918    6853    6918    6893    6993    6966
4.  7546    7554    7564    7504    7483    7529    7510    7512    7517    7719    7513    7520    7514
5.  6839    6951    6882    6836    6854    6880    6846    7017    6874    6867    6828    6848    6864

Conclusion (skipping the analysis)
Even without a statistical analysis, it's easy to see that my algorithm is faster than the other tested algorithms. The difference with the fastest variant of “fast algorithm” however is less than 1 percent. The Improved slow algorithm is 30%-35% slower than the fastest algorithm”.

On the other hand, even the slowest algorithm performs a calculation on average in less than a microsecond. So under normal circumstances speed is not really an issue. In my opinion the best algorithm is mainly a matter of taste, so choose any of the tested algorithms on other criteria.

  • Does the algorithm gives the best result?
  • Is the algorithm available in my favorite language?
  • What is the code size of the algorithm?
  • Is the algorithm readable, understandable?

Source code

The source code below contains all used algorithms. It includes:

  • My original algorithm (with comments)
  • A even faster version of my algorithm (but less readable)
  • The original slow algorithm
  • All tested algorithms
public class DoubleToFraction
{
    // ===================================================
    // Sjaak algorithm - original version
    //

    public static Fraction SjaakOriginal(double value, double accuracy)
    {
        // Split value in a sign, an integer part, a fractional part
        int sign = value < 0 ? -1 : 1;
        value = value < 0 ? -value : value;
        int integerpart = (int)value;
        value -= integerpart;

        // check if the fractional part is near 0
        double minimalvalue = value - accuracy;
        if (minimalvalue < 0.0) return new Fraction(sign * integerpart, 1);

        // check if the fractional part is near 1
        double maximumvalue = value + accuracy;
        if (maximumvalue > 1.0) return new Fraction(sign * (integerpart + 1), 1);

        // The left fraction (a/b) is initially (0/1), the right fraction (c/d) is initially (1/1)
        // Together they form a Farey pair.
        // We will keep the left fraction below the minimumvalue and the right fraction above the maximumvalue
        int a = 0;
        int b = 1;
        int c = 1;
        int d = (int)(1 / maximumvalue);

        // The first interation is performed above. Calculate maximum n where (n*a+c)/(n*b+d) >= maximumvalue 
        // This is the same as n <= 1/maximumvalue - 1, d will become n+1 = floor(1/maximumvalue)

        // repeat forever (at least until we cannot close in anymore)
        while (true)
        {
            // Close in from the left n times. 
            // Calculate maximum n where (a+n*c)/(b+n*d) <= minimalvalue
            // This is the same as n <= (b * minimalvalue - a) / (c-d*minimalvalue)
            int n = (int)((b * minimalvalue - a) / (c - d * minimalvalue));

            // If we cannot close in from the left (and also not from the right anymore) the loop ends
            if (n == 0) break;

            // Update left fraction
            a += n * c;
            b += n * d;

            // Close in from the right n times.
            // Calculate maximum n where (n*a+c)/(n*b+d) >= maximumvalue
            // This is the same as n <= (c - d * maximumvalue) / (b * maximumvalue - a)
            n = (int)((c - d * maximumvalue) / (b * maximumvalue - a));

            // If we cannot close in from the right (and also not from the left anymore) the loop ends
            if (n == 0) break;

            // Update right fraction
            c += n * a;
            d += n * b;
        }

        // We cannot close in anymore
        // The best fraction will be the mediant of the left and right fraction = (a+c)/(b+d)
        int denominator = b + d;
        return new Fraction(sign * (integerpart * denominator + (a + c)), denominator);

    }

    // ===================================================
    // Sjaak algorithm - faster version
    //

    public static Fraction SjaakFaster(double value, double accuracy)
    {
        int sign = value < 0 ? -1 : 1;
        value = value < 0 ? -value : value;
        int integerpart = (int)value;
        value -= integerpart;
        double minimalvalue = value - accuracy;
        if (minimalvalue < 0.0) return new Fraction(sign * integerpart, 1);
        double maximumvalue = value + accuracy;
        if (maximumvalue > 1.0) return new Fraction(sign * (integerpart + 1), 1);
        //int a = 0;
        int b = 1;
        //int c = 1;
        int d = (int)(1 / maximumvalue);
        double left_n = minimalvalue; // b * minimalvalue - a
        double left_d = 1.0 - d * minimalvalue; // c - d * minimalvalue
        double right_n = 1.0 - d * maximumvalue; // c - d * maximumvalue
        double right_d = maximumvalue; // b * maximumvalue - a            
        while (true)
        {
            if (left_n < left_d) break;
            int n = (int)(left_n / left_d);
            //a += n * c;
            b += n * d;
            left_n -= n * left_d;
            right_d -= n * right_n;
            if (right_n < right_d) break;
            n = (int)(right_n / right_d);
            //c += n * a;
            d += n * b;
            left_d -= n * left_n;
            right_n -= n * right_d;
        }


        int denominator = b + d;
        int numerator = (int)(value * denominator + 0.5);
        return new Fraction(sign * (integerpart * denominator + numerator), denominator);
    }

    // ===================================================
    // Original Farley - Implemented by btilly
    //

    public static Fraction OriginalFarley(double value, double accuracy)
    {
        // Split value in a sign, an integer part, a fractional part
        int sign = value < 0 ? -1 : 1;
        value = value < 0 ? -value : value;
        int integerpart = (int)value;
        value -= integerpart;

        // check if the fractional part is near 0
        double minimalvalue = value - accuracy;
        if (minimalvalue < 0.0) return new Fraction(sign * integerpart, 1);

        // check if the fractional part is near 1
        double maximumvalue = value + accuracy;
        if (maximumvalue > 1.0) return new Fraction(sign * (integerpart + 1), 1);

        // The lower fraction is 0/1
        int lower_numerator = 0;
        int lower_denominator = 1;

        // The upper fraction is 1/1
        int upper_numerator = 1;
        int upper_denominator = 1;

        while (true)
        {
            // The middle fraction is (lower_numerator + upper_numerator) / (lower_denominator + upper_denominator)
            int middle_numerator = lower_numerator + upper_numerator;
            int middle_denominator = lower_denominator + upper_denominator;

            if (middle_denominator * maximumvalue < middle_numerator)
            {
                // real + error < middle : middle is our new upper
                upper_numerator = middle_numerator;
                upper_denominator = middle_denominator;
            }
            else if (middle_numerator < minimalvalue * middle_denominator)
            {
                // middle < real - error : middle is our new lower
                lower_numerator = middle_numerator;
                lower_denominator = middle_denominator;
            }
            else
            {
                return new Fraction(sign * (integerpart * middle_denominator + middle_numerator), middle_denominator);
            }
        }
    }

    // ===================================================
    // Modified Farley - Implemented by btilly, Kay Zed
    //

    public static Fraction ModifiedFarley(double value, double accuracy)
    {
        // Split value in a sign, an integer part, a fractional part
        int sign = value < 0 ? -1 : 1;
        value = value < 0 ? -value : value;
        int integerpart = (int)value;
        value -= integerpart;

        // check if the fractional part is near 0
        double minimalvalue = value - accuracy;
        if (minimalvalue < 0.0) return new Fraction(sign * integerpart, 1);

        // check if the fractional part is near 1
        double maximumvalue = value + accuracy;
        if (maximumvalue > 1.0) return new Fraction(sign * (integerpart + 1), 1);

        // The lower fraction is 0/1
        int lower_numerator = 0;
        int lower_denominator = 1;

        // The upper fraction is 1/1
        int upper_numerator = 1;
        int upper_denominator = 1;

        while (true)
        {
            // The middle fraction is (lower_numerator + upper_numerator) / (lower_denominator + upper_denominator)
            int middle_numerator = lower_numerator + upper_numerator;
            int middle_denominator = lower_denominator + upper_denominator;

            if (middle_denominator * maximumvalue < middle_numerator)
            {
                // real + error < middle : middle is our new upper
                ModifiedFarleySeek(ref upper_numerator, ref upper_denominator, lower_numerator, lower_denominator, (un, ud) => (lower_denominator + ud) * maximumvalue < (lower_numerator + un));
            }
            else if (middle_numerator < minimalvalue * middle_denominator)
            {
                // middle < real - error : middle is our new lower
                ModifiedFarleySeek(ref lower_numerator, ref lower_denominator, upper_numerator, upper_denominator, (ln, ld) => (ln + upper_numerator) < minimalvalue * (ld + upper_denominator));
            }
            else
            {
                return new Fraction(sign * (integerpart * middle_denominator + middle_numerator), middle_denominator);
            }
        }
    }

    private static void ModifiedFarleySeek(ref int a, ref int b, int ainc, int binc, Func<int, int, bool> f)
    {
        // Binary seek for the value where f() becomes false
        a += ainc;
        b += binc;

        if (f(a, b))
        {
            int weight = 1;

            do
            {
                weight *= 2;
                a += ainc * weight;
                b += binc * weight;
            }
            while (f(a, b));

            do
            {
                weight /= 2;

                int adec = ainc * weight;
                int bdec = binc * weight;

                if (!f(a - adec, b - bdec))
                {
                    a -= adec;
                    b -= bdec;
                }
            }
            while (weight > 1);
        }
    }

    // ===================================================
    // Richards implementation by Jemery Hermann
    //

    public static Fraction RichardsJemeryHermann(double value, double accuracy, int maxIterations = 20)
    {

        // Split value in a sign, an integer part, a fractional part
        int sign = value < 0 ? -1 : 1;
        value = value < 0 ? -value : value;
        int integerpart = (int)value;
        value -= integerpart;

        // check if the fractional part is near 0
        double minimalvalue = value - accuracy;
        if (minimalvalue < 0.0) return new Fraction(sign * integerpart, 1);

        // check if the fractional part is near 1
        double maximumvalue = value + accuracy;
        if (maximumvalue > 1.0) return new Fraction(sign * (integerpart + 1), 1);

        // Richards - Implemented by Jemery Hermann
        double[] d = new double[maxIterations + 2];
        d[1] = 1;
        double z = value;
        double n = 1;
        int t = 1;

        while (t < maxIterations && Math.Abs(n / d[t] - value) > accuracy)
        {
            t++;
            z = 1 / (z - (int)z);
            d[t] = d[t - 1] * (int)z + d[t - 2];
            n = (int)(value * d[t] + 0.5);
        }

        return new Fraction(sign * (integerpart * (int)d[t] + (int)n), (int)d[t]);
    }

    // ===================================================
    // Richards implementation by Kennedy
    //

    public static Fraction RichardsKennedy(double value, double accuracy)
    {
        // Split value in a sign, an integer part, a fractional part
        int sign = value < 0 ? -1 : 1;
        value = value < 0 ? -value : value;
        int integerpart = (int)value;
        value -= integerpart;

        // check if the fractional part is near 0
        double minimalvalue = value - accuracy;
        if (minimalvalue < 0.0) return new Fraction(sign * integerpart, 1);

        // check if the fractional part is near 1
        double maximumvalue = value + accuracy;
        if (maximumvalue > 1.0) return new Fraction(sign * (integerpart + 1), 1);

        // Richards
        double z = value;
        int previousDenominator = 0;
        int denominator = 1;
        int numerator;
        do
        {
            z = 1.0 / (z - (int)z);
            int temp = denominator;
            denominator = denominator * (int)z + previousDenominator;
            previousDenominator = temp;
            numerator = (int)(value * denominator + 0.5);
        }
        while (Math.Abs(value - (double)numerator / denominator) > accuracy && z != (int)z);

        return new Fraction(sign * (integerpart * denominator + numerator), denominator);
    }

    // ===================================================
    // Richards implementation by Sjaak
    //

    public static Fraction RichardsOriginal(double value, double accuracy)
    {
        // Split value in a sign, an integer part, a fractional part
        int sign = value < 0 ? -1 : 1;
        value = value < 0 ? -value : value;
        int integerpart = (int)value;
        value -= integerpart;

        // check if the fractional part is near 0
        double minimalvalue = value - accuracy;
        if (minimalvalue < 0.0) return new Fraction(sign * integerpart, 1);

        // check if the fractional part is near 1
        double maximumvalue = value + accuracy;
        if (maximumvalue > 1.0) return new Fraction(sign * (integerpart + 1), 1);

        // Richards
        double z = value;
        int denominator0 = 0;
        int denominator1 = 1;
        int numerator0 = 1;
        int numerator1 = 0;
        int n = (int)z;
        while (true)
        {
            z = 1.0 / (z - n);
            n = (int)z;

            int temp = denominator1;
            denominator1 = denominator1 * n + denominator0;
            denominator0 = temp;

            temp = numerator1;
            numerator1 = numerator1 * n + numerator0;
            numerator0 = temp;

            double d = (double)numerator1 / denominator1;
            if (d > minimalvalue && d < maximumvalue) break;
        }
        return new Fraction(sign * (integerpart * denominator1 + numerator1), denominator1);
    }

}

Here's an algorithm implemented in VB that converts Floating Point Decimal to Integer Fraction that I wrote many years ago.

Basically you start with a numerator = 0 and a denominator = 1, then if the quotient is less than the decimal input, add 1 to the numerator and if the quotient is greater than the decimal input, add 1 to the denominator. Repeat until you get within your desired precision.

If I were you I'd handle the "no repeating decimals in .NET" problem by having it convert strings with the recurrence marked somehow.

E.g. 1/3 could be represented "0.R3" 1/60 could be represented "0.01R6"

I'd require an explicit cast from double or decimal because such values could only be converted into a fraction that was close. Implicit cast from int is ok.

You could use a struct and store your fraction (f) in two longs p and q such that f=p/q, q!=0, and gcd(p, q) == 1.

Here, you can have the method for converting Decimal into Fractions:

/// <summary>
    /// Converts Decimals into Fractions.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="value">Decimal value</param>
    /// <returns>Fraction in string type</returns>
    public string DecimalToFraction(double value)
    {
        string result;
        double numerator, realValue = value;
        int num, den, decimals, length;
        num = (int)value;
        value = value - num;
        value = Math.Round(value, 5);
        length = value.ToString().Length;
        decimals = length - 2;
        numerator = value;
        for (int i = 0; i < decimals; i++)
        {
            if (realValue < 1)
            {
                numerator = numerator * 10;
            }
            else
            {
                realValue = realValue * 10;
                numerator = realValue;
            }
        }
        den = length - 2;
        string ten = "1";
        for (int i = 0; i < den; i++)
        {
            ten = ten + "0";
        }
        den = int.Parse(ten);
        num = (int)numerator;
        result = SimplifiedFractions(num, den);
        return result;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Converts Fractions into Simplest form.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="num">Numerator</param>
    /// <param name="den">Denominator</param>
    /// <returns>Simplest Fractions in string type</returns>
    string SimplifiedFractions(int num, int den)
    {
        int remNum, remDen, counter;
        if (num > den)
        {
            counter = den;
        }
        else
        {
            counter = num;
        }
        for (int i = 2; i <= counter; i++)
        {
            remNum = num % i;
            if (remNum == 0)
            {
                remDen = den % i;
                if (remDen == 0)
                {
                    num = num / i;
                    den = den / i;
                    i--;
                }
            }
        }
        return num.ToString() + "/" + den.ToString();
    }
}

Here's an algorithm I wrote for a project not too long ago. It takes a different approach, which is more akin to something you would do by hand. I can't guarantee its efficiency, but it gets the job done.

    public static string toFraction(string exp) {
        double x = Convert.ToDouble(exp);
        int sign = (Math.Abs(x) == x) ? 1 : -1;
        x = Math.Abs(x);
        int n = (int)x; // integer part
        x -= n; // fractional part
        int mult, nm, dm;
        int decCount = 0;

        Match m = Regex.Match(Convert.ToString(x), @"([0-9]+?)\1+.?$");
        // repeating fraction
        if (m.Success) {
            m = Regex.Match(m.Value, @"([0-9]+?)(?=\1)");
            mult = (int)Math.Pow(10, m.Length);

            // We have our basic fraction
            nm = (int)Math.Round(((x * mult) - x));
            dm = mult - 1;
        }
        // get the number of decimal places
        else {
            double t = x;
            while (t != 0) {
                decCount++;
                t *= 10;
                t -= (int)t;
            }
            mult = (int)Math.Pow(10, decCount);

            // We have our basic fraction
            nm = (int)((x * mult));
            dm = mult;
        }
        // can't be simplified
        if (nm < 0 || dm < 0) return exp;

        //Simplify
        Stack factors = new Stack();
        for (int i = 2; i < nm + 1; i++) {
            if (nm % i == 0) factors.Push(i);  // i is a factor of the numerator
        }
        // check against the denominator, stopping at the highest match
        while(factors.Count != 0) {
            // we have a common factor
            if (dm % (int)factors.Peek() == 0) {
                int f = (int)factors.Pop();
                nm /= f;
                dm /= f;
                break;
            }
            else factors.Pop();
        }
        nm += (n * dm);
        nm *= sign;
        if (dm == 1) return Convert.ToString(nm);
        else return Convert.ToString(nm) + "/" + Convert.ToString(dm);
    }

Simple solution/breakdown of repeating decimal.

I took the logic that the numbers 1-9 divided by 9 are repeating. AKA 7/9 = .77777

My solution would be to multiply the whole number by 9, add the repeating number, and then divide by 9 again.

    Ex: 28.66666
    28*9=252
    252+6=258
    258/9=28.66666

This method is rather easy to program as well. Truncate decimal digit, multiply by 9, add first decimal, then divide by 9.

The only thing missing is that the fraction may need to be simplified if the left number is dividable by 3.

Here are two Swift 4 conversions of popular answers to this problem:

public func decimalToFraction(_ d: Double) -> (Int, Int) {
    var df: Double = 1
    var top: Int = 1
    var bot: Int = 1

    while df != d {
        if df < d {
            top += 1
        } else {
            bot += 1
            top = Int(d * bot)
        }
        df = top / bot
    }
    return (top, bot)
}

public func realToFraction(_ value: Double, accuracy: Double = 0.00005) -> (Int, Int)? {
    var value = value
    guard accuracy >= 0 && accuracy <= 1 else {
        Swift.print(accuracy, "Must be > 0 and < 1.")
        return nil
    }
    let theSign = sign(value)
    if theSign == -1 {
        value = abs(value)
    }

    // Accuracy is the maximum relative error; convert to absolute maxError
    let maxError = theSign == 0 ? accuracy : value * accuracy

    let n = floor(value)
    value -= n

    if value < maxError {
        return (Int(theSign * n), 1)
    }

    if 1 - maxError < value {
        return (Int(theSign * (n + 1)), 1)
    }

    // The lower fraction is 0/1
    var lowerN: Double = 0
    var lowerD: Double = 1

    // The upper fraction is 1/1
    var upperN: Double = 1
    var upperD: Double = 1

    while true {
        // The middle fraction is (lowerN + upperN) / (lowerD + upperD)
        let middleN = lowerN + upperN
        let middleD = lowerD + upperD

        if middleD * (value + maxError) < middleN {
            // real + error < middle : middle is our new upper
            upperN = middleN
            upperD = middleD
        } else if middleN < (value - maxError) * middleD {
            // middle < real - error : middle is our new lower
            lowerN = middleN
            lowerD = middleD
        } else {
            // Middle is our best fraction
            return (Int(n * middleD + middleN * theSign), Int(middleD))
        }
    }
}

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