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The premise is really simple - I have a class that is running some expensive computation and I would like to show a ProgressBar to inform the user. Since I might have many computation cycles, I want to have a simple ProgressBar form that I can use many times in my code. That form does not need to know anything else but it's title, the maximum value for the ProgressBar and when to perform a step and increment. The update call is done from the Other Class, the form just displays that.

The following code is from a Windows Forms version of a ProgressBar (exported as a dll) that achieves the goal. I am trying to recreate the same functionality with WPF. From my research so far, this cannot be done. I would love if someone can prove me wrong and demonstrate a pseudo code for both the WPF codebehind and the implentation in the Other Class.

Windows Form

public partial class ProgressForm : Form {

private bool abortFlag;
string _format;

/// <summary>
/// Set up progress bar form and immediately display it modelessly.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="caption">Form caption</param>
/// <param name="format">Progress message string</param>
/// <param name="max">Number of elements to process</param>
public ProgressForm( string caption, string format, int max )
{
  _format = format;
  InitializeComponent();
  Text = caption;
  label1.Text = (null == format) ? caption : string.Format( format, 0 );
  progressBar1.Minimum = 0;
  progressBar1.Maximum = max;
  progressBar1.Value = 0;
  Show();
  Application.DoEvents();
}

public void Increment()
{
  ++progressBar1.Value;
  if( null != _format )
  {
    label1.Text = string.Format( _format, progressBar1.Value );
  }
  Application.DoEvents();
}

public bool getAbortFlag()
{
    return abortFlag;
}

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    button1.Text = "Aborting...";
    abortFlag = true;
}

protected override bool ProcessDialogKey(Keys keyData)
{
    if (Form.ModifierKeys == Keys.None && keyData == Keys.Escape)
    {
        button1.Text = "Aborting...";
        abortFlag = true;
        return true;
    }
    return base.ProcessDialogKey(keyData);
}

public void SetText(string text)
{
  label1.Text = text;
  System.Windows.Forms.Application.DoEvents();
}

public void SetProgressBarMinMax(int min, int max)
{
  progressBar1.Minimum = min;
  progressBar1.Maximum = max;
  progressBar1.Value = 0;
}

public void IncrementProgressBar()
{
  progressBar1.Value++;
  System.Windows.Forms.Application.DoEvents();
}

public void HideProgressBar()
{
  progressBar1.Visible = false;
  System.Windows.Forms.Application.DoEvents();
}

public void ShowProgressBar()
{
  progressBar1.Visible = true;
  System.Windows.Forms.Application.DoEvents();
}

}

Some Method in Other Class

public class OtherClass(){
    int counter = 0;
    int n = numberOfIterations;
    string s = "{0} of " + n.ToString() + String.Format(" elements processed.", counter.ToString());
    string caption = "Duplicating ..";

    using (ProgressForm pf = new ProgressForm(caption, s, n)){
        //Something heavy to compute        
        foreach (var sheet in sheetsToDuplicate)
        {
           if (pf.getAbortFlag())
           {
               return;
           }
           counter ++;
           pf.Increment();
        }
    }
}

I think this should be pretty straightfoward but I cannot find a single source out there to show how this can be achieved. For me, the important points to hightlight are:

  1. The WPF (Window) ProgressBar control does not have reference to the Other Class. (because it will be shipped as a dll and should be able to adopt any scenario)
  2. The loop is run in the Other Class.

Thank you.

  • 2
    Suffice it to say this is certainly possible (MahApps has a reusable dialog service that shows part of the answer). I'm not sure I'll have time to do a full answer but this is possible, especially when your app follows MVVM. – BradleyDotNET Jul 9 '18 at 14:50
  • Following MVVM is irrelevant .. isn't it? The class that will use the WPF form shoudln't care how the form is structured. 1 entry point (ProgressBar bar = new ProgressBar(maxValue)) -> bar.Show() -> bar.Increment() -> bar.Close() and maybe bar.Cancelled? to capture a cancel from the ProgressBar form. Sorry for using Windows Forms terminology. The app to consume the ProgressBar doesn't have to be WPF either, it can be anything. – Dido Nenov Jul 9 '18 at 14:56
  • Following the pattern means you can abstract away most of the form details and some of the marshalling becomes automatic. The consuming app not being WPF may make this fairly problematic in general – BradleyDotNET Jul 9 '18 at 15:01
  • If you have a heavy computation loop, then run it on a background thread, not on the GUI thread. Use the IProgress interface to abstract the view (the WPF progress bar window) from the calling code, so the calling code will not depend on a particular implementation. BTW, Application.DoEvents() is an Evil of all evils. It can break so much and even lead to a deadlock, cause reentrance problems etc. – dymanoid Jul 9 '18 at 16:23
  • Thank you for the proposal to look into IProgress interface. Again, the only thing I find is a way to create an async Task in the Other Class and progress.Report(i) from within the, now asynchronous, method. (like here blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/dotnet/2012/06/06/…) I think I give up at this point with the conclusion that it's entirely possible that it's not possible to achieve a clean and simple split between UI and Work using WPF. – Dido Nenov Jul 10 '18 at 15:57

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