0

I'm developing a new Django site. It uses some existing Django apps and I'm building some of my own.

Current folder structure (truncated):

projects/
- mysite/
  - .git/
  - conf/
  - mysite/
    - __init__.py
    - settings.py
  - myapp/
    - __init__.py
    - admin.py
    - models.py
  - manage.py

I'd like to make my site and apps available as separate Git repositories. In other words, someone may want to clone/contribute to the whole site, or they may want to clone/contribute to just an app.

According to the Packaging your app section of Advanced tutorial: How to write reusable apps the following folder structure is required for separate site and app folders:

projects/
- mysite/
  - .git/
  - conf/
  - mysite/
    - __init__.py
    - settings.py
  - manage.py
- django-myapp
  - .git/
  - myapp/
    - __init__.py
    - admin.py
    - models.py
  - setup.py

But in Using your own package the same tutorial suggests that the only way to make and use local modifications is to:

  1. Modify the app folder
  2. Run python setup.py sdist to build the app
  3. Run pip install --user /path/to/django-myapp.tar.gz to install it
  4. Run the Django site

How can I organise these folders so that I can easily modify either site or app code, and immediately run the site locally? In other words, avoid building and importing a local tarball each time.

  • Simplest way would be to put the app name into your project's .gitignore file. – C14L Jul 9 '18 at 18:21
0

My naive reading is that the following (untested) structure should work, with myapp excluded from the virtualenv used to run the site locally...

projects/
- mysite/
  - .git/
  - conf/
  - mysite/
    - __init__.py
    - settings.py
  - myapp/ --> symlink to projects/django-myapp/myapp
  - .gitignore --> ignores myapp/
  - manage.py
- django-myapp
  - .git/
  - myapp/
    - __init__.py
    - admin.py
    - models.py
  - setup.py

Obviously releases should be tested and coordinated carefully, so that released versions and published dependencies work together correctly.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.