Suppose I have the following dataframe, where both Y and Z are constant within ID:

   ID TYPE  X    Y   Z
0   1    A  1  foo  10
1   1    B  2  foo  10
2   2    A  3  bar  20
3   2    B  4  bar  20
4   3    A  5  baz  30
5   3    B  6  baz  30

I would like to reshape the data from a "long" to "wide" format:

   ID  XA  XB    Y   Z
0   1   1   2  foo  10
1   2   3   4  bar  20
2   3   5   6  baz  30

However, if I use pandas.DataFrame.pivot():

df_new = df.pivot(index='ID', columns='TYPE')

I will get duplicates of Y and Z:

      X       Y        Z    
TYPE  A  B    A    B   A   B
ID                          
1     1  2  foo  foo  10  10
2     3  4  bar  bar  20  20
3     5  6  baz  baz  30  30

To get the desired output, I could do the following:

import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame({'ID': [1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3],
                   'TYPE': ['A', 'B', 'A', 'B', 'A', 'B'],
                   'X': [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6],
                   'Y': ['foo', 'foo', 'bar', 'bar', 'baz', 'baz'],
                   'Z': [10, 10, 20, 20, 30, 30]})


def long_to_wide(df, i, j, varlist):
    df_wide = df.pivot(index='ID', columns='TYPE')
    df_wide.columns = [''.join(col).strip() for col in df_wide.columns.values]
    df_wide.reset_index(inplace=True)

    for var in varlist:
        if pd.Series.equals(df_wide[var + 'A'], df_wide[var + 'B']):
            df_wide.drop((var + 'B'), axis = 1, inplace = True)
        else:
            raise
            # Error handling of some sort...
        df_wide = df_wide.rename(columns={var + 'A': var})

    return df_wide


df_new = long_to_wide(df, 'ID', 'TYPE', ['Y', 'Z'])

However, I feel that this must be unnecessarily complicated. For example, to get the desired output in Stata, one could run either:

reshape wide X, i(ID) j(TYPE)

or

reshape wide X, i(ID Y Z) j(TYPE)

This situation is quite common and I therefore thought there should be a built-in method to handle it. But after looking around at the Pandas documentation and also here at Stack Overflow, I haven't found a simpler solution.

Is there one?

  • Have you tried pandas.DataFrame.pivot_table? – Pearly Spencer Jul 9 at 19:19
  • I looked at that briefly, but I was under the impression that it aggregates data in one way or another? – matnor Jul 9 at 19:22
  • Try this: df.pivot(index='ID', columns='TYPE', values='X') – Pearly Spencer Jul 9 at 19:32
  • With this way, you keep only column 'X'. But I guess you could merge it with all variables constant within 'ID'. – matnor Jul 9 at 19:41
  • Did you find my answer helpful at all? – Pearly Spencer Jul 10 at 16:39
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I just had a better look at this and the function pandas.DataFrame.pivot() is actually performing as expected. Unlike Stata's reshape, which is a command and does quite a few things under the hood, pivot() simply re-arranges the data.

@Heleemur's solution is clever and works great, but usually it will be your responsibility to do the renaming or getting rid of the duplicates.

Here's an intuitive solution based on pivot() (or pivot_table()):

import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame({'ID': [1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3],
                   'TYPE': ['A', 'B', 'A', 'B', 'A', 'B'],
                   'X': [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6],
                   'Y': ['foo', 'foo', 'bar', 'bar', 'baz', 'baz'],
                   'Z': [10, 10, 20, 20, 30, 30]})

wanted = df.pivot(index='ID', columns='TYPE')[[('X','A'), ('X','B'), ('Y','A'), ('Z','A')]].reset_index()
wanted.columns = wanted.columns.get_level_values(0)
wanted.columns = ['ID', 'XA', 'XB', 'Y', 'Z']
wanted

   ID  XA  XB    Y   Z
0   1   1   2  foo  10
1   2   3   4  bar  20
2   3   5   6  baz  30

Another way is also the following:

wanted = df.pivot(index='ID', columns='TYPE').reset_index()
wanted.columns = [' '.join(col)for col in wanted.columns.values]
wanted = wanted.iloc[:, [0,2] + list(range(1, len(wanted.columns)-1, 2))]
wanted

   ID   X B  X A  Y A  Z A
0    1    2    1  foo   10
1    2    4    3  bar   20
2    3    6    5  baz   30

wanted.columns = ['ID', 'XB', 'XA', 'Y', 'Z']
wanted

   ID  XB  XA    Y   Z
0   1   2   1  foo  10
1   2   4   3  bar  20
2   3   6   5  baz  30

In a larger dataframe with more columns, you may want to keep the original names though.


EDIT:

Here's an equivalent solution to the one from @Heleemur with pivot_table():

wanted = df.pivot_table(index=['ID', 'Y', 'Z'], columns='TYPE').reset_index()
wanted.columns = [''.join(c) for c in wanted.columns.values]
wanted

   ID    Y   Z  XA  XB
0   1  foo  10   1   2
1   2  bar  20   3   4
2   3  baz  30   5   6
  • Does the pivot_table() solution work if the X column is a string variable? It does not work when I try it. – matnor Jul 14 at 19:26
  • Have a look in this post. – Pearly Spencer Jul 14 at 19:29

I did this by setting indexes, merging multiindex column names and resetting indexes. I'm sure this is possible through pivot tables as well (with df defined as your sample data frame).

df2 = df.set_index(['ID', 'Y', 'Z', 'TYPE']).unstack()
df2.columns = [''.join(c) for c in df2.columns.values]
df2.reset_index()

outputs:

   ID    Y   Z  XA  XB
0   1  foo  10   1   2
1   2  bar  20   3   4
2   3  baz  30   5   6
  • Very nice answer! I guess the final line should be df2 = df2.reset_index()? – matnor Jul 9 at 19:44
  • yes, exactly, you can assign it to a different variable as well if you need to. – Haleemur Ali Jul 9 at 19:48

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.