5

Possible Duplicate:
.NET Enumeration allows comma in the last field

public enum SubPackageBackupModes
{
    Required,
    NotRequired //no comma
}

public enum SubPackageBackupModes
{
    Required,
    NotRequired, //extra unnecessary comma 
}

Since both compile, is there any differences between these declarations?

marked as duplicate by digEmAll, Ani, Hans Passant, Cody Gray, Jim Mischel Feb 26 '11 at 15:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    Nope......................its a convenience thing, for adding the next and the next.... – Mitch Wheat Feb 26 '11 at 10:57
  • 1
    Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/792753/… – Greg Treleaven Feb 26 '11 at 10:58
  • 5
    @Greg Treleaven - its not an exact duplicate. c != c# – froeschli Feb 26 '11 at 11:04
  • True, but C# borrows a large portion of its syntax from C. It makes sense that if it's allowed in C99, it would be allowed in C#. A similar rationale applies, in addition to history. – Cody Gray Feb 26 '11 at 11:04
  • 3
    @Greg: that's link is for C not C#, that's more suitable --> stackoverflow.com/questions/2147333/… – digEmAll Feb 26 '11 at 11:06
4

I prefer second syntax because if you will add addition member to your enum you will have only one line difference in SCM.

  • You can also achieve that by putting the comma before the value (i.e. no comma on the first line) -- ugly but can be useful for cases where the extra comma isn't allowed. – tgdavies Feb 26 '11 at 11:01
  • 4
    @tdavies, agree, ugly :) I will prefer having two lines of diff instead of lines starting with comma. – Snowbear Feb 26 '11 at 11:03
2

No, there is no difference.

This was allowed in C++ also, and that continues. I guess it is easier with the comma, since you may comment out the last enum element and it is easier for code-generation tools.