15

I'm studying Vue (2.x) + Vuex for some time now and one pattern that I've always seen around is the use of Mutation Types.

To me it is just unnecessary code to add complexity to a project with more files, maybe I didn't have enough experience with it to understand the real usage, therefore this question.

According to the Mutation Types docs it states that it is entirely optional and you should use if you like it also states that "This allows the code to take advantage of tooling like linters, and putting all constants in a single file allows your collaborators to get an at-a-glance view of what mutations are possible in the entire application" and it stop there.

And Also:

Whether to use constants is largely a preference - it can be helpful in large projects with many developers, but it's totally optional if you don't like them

What I would like to understand is what exactly are the advantages here both for tooling and in the so called large projects. Some examples of it would be really nice.

Even the sample code in the docs is silly enough to discourage it:

//mutation-types.js
export const SOME_MUTATION = 'SOME_MUTATION';

// store.js
import Vuex from 'vuex'
import { SOME_MUTATION } from './mutation-types'

const store = new Vuex.Store({
  state: { ... },
  mutations: {
    // we can use the ES2015 computed property name feature
    // to use a constant as the function name
    [SOME_MUTATION] (state) {
      // mutate state
    }
  }
})

Instead of just:

// store.js
import Vuex from 'vuex'

const store = new Vuex.Store({
  state: { ... },
  mutations: {
    //To me this is already clear enough to understand the purpose 
    //of the mutation and to see AT-A-GLANCE what all mutations in the
    //Application are
    someMutation (state) {
      // mutate state
    }
  }
})

Specially because modern IDEs (Eclipse, Npp does that) already have the grouping features which means that you will se it all at-a-glance like:

...
mutations: {
  + someMutation1 
  + someMutation2 
  + someMutation3 
  + someMutation4 
  + someMutation5 
  + someMutation6 
  + someMutation7 
}
...

Without seen a practical usage of such a thing I think this is like the 5 Monkeys Experiment

3
  • 1
    As you say, even the documentation mentions this is really a preference thing.
    – Bert
    Jul 10 '18 at 14:45
  • @Bert yeah, this is like the five monkey experiment, why everyone keeps using this =/ Jul 10 '18 at 14:51
  • 2
    Prevent typos, re-use constants in actions or components, and intellisense.
    – Ricky
    Jul 10 '18 at 15:50
17

Say that you have this example:

// store.js
import Vuex from 'vuex'

const store = new Vuex.Store({
  state: { ... },
  mutations: {
    setRelationshipWithRolePlayers (state) {
      // mutate state
    }
  }
})

and then in another component I do:

this.$store.commit('setRelationshipsWithReolePlayers');

Importing constant saves you from spending time debugging issues caused by small typos like the one above, which sadly occurs more often than what we would like to.

Also when you have a lot of mutations and actions (it's nice to use mutations types also for actions) it's not easy to remember how they are called, so importing them from a mutation-types file makes it super easy to auto import constants with auto completion.

Also having all the mutations and actions in the same file makes it easy to check whether a mutation/action name is already used in another part of the project without having to make global searches (keep in mind that as the project grows you probably want to modularise you store or have more than one store).

It probably won't determine the success or failure of your project, but it can be of great help, and save you a good amount of time in medium-big projects

2
  • Hmm... Without writing it clear on both given answers I think the best description would be: Mutation types would prevent common typos mistakes because since you are using identifiers the errors (runtime or compile time) would be clear and save a lot of debugging time It answers both of my question about the lint tools and practical usage! Jul 10 '18 at 15:51
  • Just to be clear, the "use of the identifiers" is the really catch here. Jul 10 '18 at 15:55
9

I use Mutation Types to skip typos while using mapMutations or to use Symbol as method names

// mutation-types.js
export const SOME_MUTATION = 'SOME_MUTATION'
export const SOME_MUTATION_SYMBOL = Symbol('SOME_MUTATION')

// store.js
import Vuex from 'vuex'
import { SOME_MUTATION, SOME_MUTATION_SYMBOL } from './mutation-types'

const store = new Vuex.Store({
  state: { ... },
  mutations: {
    // we can use the ES2015 computed property name feature
    // to use a constant as the function name
    [SOME_MUTATION] (state) {
      // mutate state
    },
    [SOME_MUTATION_SYMBOL] (state) {
      // mutate state
    }
  }
})


import { mapMutations } from 'vuex'
import { SOME_MUTATION, SOME_MUTATION_SYMBOL } from './mutation-types'

export default {
  // ...
  methods: {
    ...mapMutations([
      // 'SOME_MUTATION' 
      SOME_MUTATION // no typos and you get IDE intellisence
    ]),
    ...mapMutations({
      localName: SOME_MUTATION_SYMBOL // map to localName
    })
  }
}
2
  • Thanks for your input. I added a comment on @zizzo 's answer that states what you both want to mean. I think now I get it. I will accept his answer since it was first and is alike yours. Jul 10 '18 at 15:52
  • While @zizzo explains the use case well, I greatly appreciate the clear and concise example code you provided. Is there any benefit or reason to use a symbol over a string? My understanding is that the Symbol is guaranteed unique (even if you use the same string for both), so I can see how it prevents conflicting mutations constants, but is there anything else to consider? Do symbols appear well in Vue dev tools? Aug 27 '18 at 2:42

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