4

I have a pretty big model (around 5 million variables and constraints).

The building time is a few minutes and the solving time is a few minutes too (with gurobi)

But it takes very long to write the model (about 2 hours)

This is the time if I use model.write('model.lp', io_options={'symbolic_solver_labels': True}) to be able to record it

It's about the same time if I use SolverFactory and solve directly the model from pyomo

here is a little sample, I understand that this model is trivial for gurobi, so I'm not comparing the solving time with the building time here, but I don't understand why it's so long, I though that the problem could come from the disk writing speed, but it seems that the disk is never overloaded and almost not used

import pyomo.environ as pyo
import time

size = 500000

model = pyo.ConcreteModel()
model.set = pyo.RangeSet(0, size)
model.x = pyo.Var(model.set, within=pyo.Reals)
model.constrList = pyo.ConstraintList()
for i in range(size):
    model.constrList.add(expr = model.x[i] >= 1)
model.obj = pyo.Objective(expr=sum(model.x[i] for i in range(size)), sense=pyo.minimize)

opt = pyo.SolverFactory('gurobi')

_time = time.time()
res = opt.solve(model)
print(">>> total time () in {:.2f}s".format(time.time() - _time))

print(res)

the results are that the time of the whole solve function is 27 s, but the solving time of gurobi is only 4 s.

3 Answers 3

3

From my trails with speeding up pyomo model generation you need to benchmark first what part of the process is slowing it down. (Which is really a general advice for perfomance tuning)

so I put you code into a function:

def main():
    size = 500000

    model = pyo.ConcreteModel()
    model.set = pyo.RangeSet(0, size)
    model.x = pyo.Var(model.set, within=pyo.Reals)
    model.constrList = pyo.ConstraintList()
    for i in range(size):
        model.constrList.add(expr = model.x[i] >= 1)
    model.obj = pyo.Objective(expr=sum(model.x[i] for i in range(size)), sense=pyo.minimize)
    return model

so I can run in through the line profiler in ipython:

In [1]: %load_ext line_profiler                                                                                                                                                                         

In [2]: import test_pyo                                                                                                                                                                                 

In [3]: %lprun -f test_pyo.main test_pyo.main()

which shows that most of the time is spent in model.constrList.add(expr = model.x[i] >= 1).

I did not see much improvement by moving this into a rule based constraint so I decided to try to construct the expression by hand, like in the PyPSA code.

import pyomo.environ as pyo
import time
from pyomo.core.expr.numeric_expr import LinearExpression
from pyomo.core.base.constraint import _GeneralConstraintData
from pyomo.core.base.numvalue import NumericConstant

def main():
    size = 500000

    model = pyo.ConcreteModel()
    model.set = pyo.RangeSet(0, size)
    model.x = pyo.Var(model.set, within=pyo.Reals)
    setattr(model, "constraint", pyo.Constraint(model.set, noruleinit=True))
    v = getattr(model, "constraint")
    for i in v._index:
        v._data[i] = _GeneralConstraintData(None, v)
        expr = LinearExpression()
        expr.linear_vars = [model.x[i]]
        expr.linear_coefs = [1]
        expr.constant = 0
        v._data[i]._body = expr
        v._data[i]._equality = False
        v._data[i]._lower = NumericConstant(1)
        v._data[i]._upper = None

    model.obj = pyo.Objective(expr=pyo.quicksum(model.x[i] for i in range(size)), sense=pyo.minimize)
    return model

which seems to yield about 50% performance improvement. The line profiler shows that a lot of time is now spend in creating the set, the empty LinearExpression object, and also in creating the objective. It might be that fiddling with the objective might improve things a little more.

1
  • Well turns out if you also create the LinearExpression for the objective by hand you can get another minor improvement
    – Florian K.
    Sep 10, 2019 at 11:30
0

I think that your implicit question is "How can I make this faster?"

If write time is a problem, you might look into the direct python interface to Gurobi SolverFactory('gurobi', io_format='python'). Setting the symbolic_solver_labels flag to True will almost always increase the write time of the model, because component name lookups can be expensive.

3
  • thank you for your answer, io_format='python' doesn't seem to influence to much the speed, and for the symbolic labels, I usualy write my models only for debug, so I need the labels
    – Nank
    Jul 11, 2018 at 11:08
  • Ah, so your priority is to be able to write out the entire model for debugging purposes? Or are you just trying to inspect a certain part of the model?
    – Qi Chen
    Jul 11, 2018 at 13:53
  • 1
    I don't really care about the speed when writing the model because I'm just using this when debuging. My problem is more when solving directly from pyomo, I was expecting the building time of the model being negligible next to the solving time, but it's the other way around, that's what I don't understand
    – Nank
    Jul 11, 2018 at 13:59
0

It is also worth checking you have the latest version of pyomo installed. I recently updated from v 5.5.0 to 5.6.8 and saw a decrease in build + solve time from 5s to 1s (for a problem that is obviously much smaller than yours!).

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.