In the sample below, I am building a protocol that deals with an unknown object type, All I know is that the type could be a String or an Int or entirely different class Resource. I want to support these different type classes by adding extensions. At least thats what I thought the right approach would be:

public protocol InstrumentProtocol : class  {
    associatedtype Item: AnyObject
    var item: Item? { get set }
    var identifier: String? { get }
}
public class AbstractBase : InstrumentProtocol {

    public var item: AnyObject?
    public var identifier: String?
    public init(_ i : AnyObject) {
        item = i
    }
    public func about() {
        print(self.item) // Any Object
    }
}

public extension InstrumentProtocol where Self.Item : Instrument {

    public func about() {
        print(self.item) //Should be of Instrument type
    }
}

 public extension InstrumentProtocol where Self.Item : String {

    public func about() {
        print(self.item) //Should be of String type
    }
}

This is what I want to achieve, but its not possible that I can address two types of Items.

The item property type is unknown to me. Is there a good way to do this?

  • An associatedtype without corresponding typealias is useless. If you know that Item can be only three different types it might be better to create a protocol which those three types conform to. OK, you still have to cast the type to the static one but everything is better than AnyObject. – vadian Jul 10 at 19:28
  • If I have to cast the type anyway, then I could do that without create separate protocols for each. Would there be an alternative approach? perhaps without the associatedtype approach? – user134611 Jul 10 at 21:07

I think I have a solution to your problem. You could do this that way:

public class AbstractBase<T> {

  public var item: T?
  public init(_ i : T) {
      item = i
  }

  public func about() {
      print("Any")
      print(self.item)
  }
}

public extension AbstractBase where T == Int {

  public func about() {
      print("Int")
      print(self.item)
  }
}

public extension AbstractBase where T == String {

  public func about() {
      print("String")
      print(self.item)
  }
}

then

AbstractBase("string").about()
AbstractBase(4).about()

will give you in console:

String
Optional("string")
Int
Optional(4)

Any other type will go to AbstractBase about() implementation.

Of course, the compiler has to know the type on compile time. If you need this recognition of type at runtime I think casting is the only way.

I hope it will help you.

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