3

I try to count the number of children inside a div using jquery $(this) selector and the element's class. And the results are different. I thought jquery's $(this) refers to the owner object of function, is there any thing special about $(this) that I am missing?

$('.parent').ready(function(){
        $('.parent').children().length; // 6
        $(this).children().length; // 1
});
  • 1
    Apart from the syntax error in the 3rd line? – mingos Feb 26 '11 at 16:21
  • oh yes, apart from it (I fixed it) :) – Khang Nguyen Feb 27 '11 at 14:36
5

This:

    $('.parent').children().length; // 6

is the correct way to do it. This:

    $(this).children().each(function().length; // 1

is a syntax error. If you really wanted to iterate through the children you could use ".each()" but you'd have to do it properly:

    $(this).children().each(function() {
      var $child = $(this);
      // ...
    });

Note that inside the ".each()" callback, this will refer to each child in succession as the function is called by jQuery.

  • Your $(this).children().each(function() {}); doesnt work for me – Khang Nguyen Feb 27 '11 at 15:18
  • Well as written in the example, it doesn't do anything; what do you want it to do? That's not the way to count the number of children; it is a way to perform some operation on each child element however. – Pointy Feb 27 '11 at 15:38
  • ok sure $.each() is not a (good) way to count the number of children and I wasnt asking about $.each() anyway. I was asking about the difference of $('.parent') and $(this) in $('.parent').ready() function. I thought those two selectors would be the same but seems like I was wrong, any idea? – Khang Nguyen Feb 27 '11 at 15:47
  • 1
    Well $('.parent') selects all elements with class "parent". Inside the ".each()" function, this will refer to a single element. The "ready()" handler always applies to the whole document, regardless of what selector you use, so in the "ready" handler this will not refer to your element at all. – Pointy Feb 27 '11 at 15:58
  • oh see, thanks Pointy – Khang Nguyen Feb 28 '11 at 4:08
0

$(this) inside the $('.parent').ready() method refers to $('.parent') object.

$(this) inside the each() method of the children() collection refers to the current child iterated.

So the way to achieve same number (for whatever reasons you have) is:

$('.parent').ready(function(){
   var directLength = $(this).children().length; // 6
   var indirectLength = 0;
   $(this).children().each(function(){
      indirectLength++;
   });

   alert([directLength, indirectLength].join("\n"));
});

Edit: your comments can have only one meaning: you have 6 elements with class parent and each of those have only one child. So I assume you're want to count the parent elements, here is proper code for this:

$(document).ready(function() {
   var directLength = $('.parent').length; // 6
   var indirectLength = 0;
   $('.parent').each(function() {
      indirectLength++;
   });

   alert([directLength, indirectLength].join("\n"));
});
  • I fixed the syntax error. I ran your function and it gave me "1 1", any idea? I totally agree the result should be be "6 6" but perhaps there is something weird about $(this) that I havent known yet – Khang Nguyen Feb 27 '11 at 15:24
  • @Nguy I think I understand now.. see my edit. The $('.parent') is the collection of all six elements with that class, I think you want to iterate each of them separately? – Shadow Wizard Feb 27 '11 at 15:38
  • @Shadow Iterating is simple with $('.parent').each(function() {}), I just wonder why the $(this) in $('.parent').ready() doesnt behave in the same way. $(this), in my question sample code, is not a collection of 6 elements ( $(this).children().length; returns 1) – Khang Nguyen Feb 27 '11 at 15:44
  • @Ngu because $(this) in your code refers to the current element with class "parent", the ready() method is applied on each of them separately. – Shadow Wizard Feb 27 '11 at 15:50
  • then, if I have, say, a div with class (or id) "parent" and I want to count the number of its children (or perform some function) within $("parent").ready() function, is there any way I can do that with the 'this' keyword? – Khang Nguyen Feb 27 '11 at 16:00

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