1

So i'm displaying multiple curves in my chart. However, when i generate a random color, all the other curves will get this color too.

int fileIndex=0;
Random r = new Random();
foreach (var i in graphContainer)
{
    fileIndex++;
    var series = new Series
    {
        Name                = legendNames[fileIndex],
        Color               = Color.FromArgb(r.Next(0, 256), r.Next(0, 256), r.Next(0, 256)),
        IsVisibleInLegend   = true,
        IsXValueIndexed     = false,
        ChartType           = SeriesChartType.Line
    };
    foreach (var j in i)
    {
        series.Points.AddXY (j.Item2, j.Item1);
    }
    chart.Invalidate        ();
    chart.Series.Add        (series);
}

Note: all the curves except one has the same values, but you get the idea. enter image description here

Why is my curves getting the same colors?

Entire function:

    private void generateWaveformsFromFileBtn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        int fileIndex                       = -1;
        string folder                       = Path.GetDirectoryName(Process.GetCurrentProcess().MainModule.FileName) + @"\WaveForms\";
        string filter                       = "*.csv";
        string[] filePath                   = Directory.GetFiles(folder, filter);
        List<string> legendNames            = new List<string>();
        List<Tuple<double, double>> graph   = new List<Tuple<double, double>>();
        List<List<Tuple<double, double>>> graphContainer = new List<List<Tuple<double, double>>>();
        chart.Series.Clear();
        foreach(var fileName in filePath) {
            legendNames.Add(Path.GetFileName(fileName));
            using (TextFieldParser csvParser = new TextFieldParser(fileName))
            {
                csvParser.SetDelimiters (new string[] { ";" });
                csvParser.ReadLine      ();
                while (!csvParser.EndOfData)
                {
                    string[] fields     = csvParser.ReadFields();
                    double current      = Double.Parse(fields[0]);
                    double inductance   = Double.Parse(fields[1]);
                    graph.Add           (new Tuple<double,double>(current, inductance));
                }
                graphContainer.Add(graph);
            }
        }
        Random r = new Random();
        foreach (var i in graphContainer)
        {
            fileIndex++;
            var series = new Series
            {
                Name                = legendNames[fileIndex],
                Color               = Color.FromArgb(r.Next(0, 256), r.Next(0, 256), r.Next(0, 256)),
                IsVisibleInLegend   = true,
                IsXValueIndexed     = false,
                ChartType           = SeriesChartType.Line
            };
            foreach (var j in i)
            {
                series.Points.AddXY (j.Item2, j.Item1);
            }
            chart.Invalidate        ();
            chart.Series.Add        (series);
        }
    }

Suggestion: (?)

enter image description here

  • is there only 1 "i", and it has all the points? Are you using the same data to determine your legend? – Mike_G Jul 11 '18 at 12:24
  • graphcontainer appears to be a list of lists of tuple<,> and IsVisibleInLegend true in the series constructor would suggest that this is the source of the four different legend colors we actually see in the top right corner. strange. do you do anything to the legend once the series have been added? – Cee McSharpface - it Jul 11 '18 at 12:26
  • @dlatikay Correct, graphContainer is of type List<List<Tuple<double,double>>>. No, i'm not doing anything else after this point to the graph. This is what displays the curves. – Joel Jul 11 '18 at 12:28
  • @Mike_G No, i is a List<Tuple<double,double>>, in graphContainer, ive stored all the different documents containing the graph-information. – Joel Jul 11 '18 at 12:31
  • @dlatikay I included the entire function for clarity. – Joel Jul 11 '18 at 12:35
0

You have already posted one solution:

Before adding new data in a loop, make sure the old data are deleted. You do it by creating a new instance:

graph = new List<Tuple<double, double>>();

This is a valid approach.

But for completeness' sake let's look at the more direct aproach as well:

graph.Clear();

This clears the data from the list object. But you are adding the graph to the graphContainer list like this:

graphContainer.Add(graph);

which means that the very object gets put into the list which, before the next loop, will be cleared. This is a common mistake. The solution is simple: Don't add the graph object itself into the graphContainer list but a copy of it :

graphContainer.Add(graph.ToList());

The ToList() call is a simple way to create a copy of a List<T>.


As for the post you linked to: The old post is strictly about runtime performance. And not about creating copies of the lists.

But even there, the recommended way to do it is depending on whether you can predict the number of elements you will put in each list.

If you can predict it and if it is somewhat largish, let's say more than a few hundred of large or a many thousands of smallish elements you should tell the list which capacity it should reserve.

This avoids multiple growing pains. After a Clear() the Capacity is retained, avoiding new allocations.

Your elements (Tuples) are small, so you probably don't need to worry about the list growing performance..

0

As suggested by user @Taw, i forgot to create a new instance of the graph or empty it, between runs.

graph = new List<Tuple<double, double>>(); // <-- solved it
while (!csvParser.EndOfData)
{
      string[] fields     = csvParser.ReadFields();
      ...
}

EDIT:

Do not use yourList.Clear() see here why: https://stackoverflow.com/a/35848659/2902996

  • No, this imo is a misunderstanding. You can and maybe should use the combination of graph.Clear() and graphContainer.Add(graph.ToList()); It surely is a very good way to go. - The old post was only about runtime performance without any consideration of keeping various the list data in memory.- The being said, it may of may not matter how many data entries you expect when initializing the list. but since you want to put them in a chart they ought to be too large anyway.. – TaW Jul 11 '18 at 14:08
  • I have added an answer after all, since yours didn't quite get all aspects right.. – TaW Jul 11 '18 at 14:32

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