5

I was trying to implement a Braun Tree with Haskell, defined like this:

{-# LANGUAGE GADTs #-}
{-# LANGUAGE DataKinds #-}
{-# LANGUAGE PolyKinds #-}
{-# LANGUAGE KindSignatures #-}
{-# LANGUAGE TypeOperators #-}
{-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies #-}
{-# LANGUAGE FlexibleInstances #-}
{-# LANGUAGE TypeApplications #-}
{-# LANGUAGE ScopedTypeVariables #-}

data BraunTree (n :: Nat) a where
    Empty :: BraunTree 0 a
    Fork :: a -> BraunTree n a -> 
            BraunTree m a ->
            Either (n :~: m) (n :~: (m + 1)) ->
            BraunTree (n + m + 1) a

Now, I am trying to experiment with how I can "typesafely" insert things into this tree.

insert :: a -> BraunTree (n :: Nat) a -> BraunTree (n + 1 :: Nat) a
insert x Empty = Fork x Empty Empty (Left Refl)
insert x (Fork y (t1 :: BraunTree p a) (t2 :: BraunTree q a) (Left (Refl :: p :~: q))) = Fork x (t1' :: BraunTree (p + 1) a) (t2 :: BraunTree q a) (Right (sucCong Refl :: (p + 1) :~: (q + 1)))
    where
        t1' :: BraunTree (p + 1) a
        t1' = insert x t1

with sucCong as

sucCong :: ((p :: Nat) :~: (q :: Nat)) -> (p + 1 :: Nat) :~: (q + 1 :: Nat)
sucCong Refl = Refl

Now, while the first clause of the insert compiles fine, the second line throws a confusing error.

/home/agnishom/test/typeExp/braun.hs:31:90: error:
    • Could not deduce: (((n1 + 1) + n1) + 1) ~ (n + 1)
      from the context: n ~ ((n1 + m) + 1)
        bound by a pattern with constructor:
                   Fork :: forall a (n :: Nat) (m :: Nat).
                           a
                           -> BraunTree n a
                           -> BraunTree m a
                           -> Either (n :~: m) (n :~: (m + 1))
                           -> BraunTree ((n + m) + 1) a,
                 in an equation for ‘insert’
        at /home/agnishom/test/typeExp/braun.hs:31:11-85
      or from: m ~ n1
        bound by a pattern with constructor:
                   Refl :: forall k (a :: k). a :~: a,
                 in an equation for ‘insert’
        at /home/agnishom/test/typeExp/braun.hs:31:69-72
      Expected type: BraunTree (n + 1) a
        Actual type: BraunTree (((n1 + 1) + m) + 1) a
      NB: ‘+’ is a type function, and may not be injective
    • In the expression:
        Fork
          x
          (t1' :: BraunTree (p + 1) a)
          (t2 :: BraunTree q a)
          (Right (sucCong Refl :: (p + 1) :~: (q + 1)))
      In an equation for ‘insert’:
          insert
            x
            (Fork y
                  (t1 :: BraunTree p a)
                  (t2 :: BraunTree q a)
                  (Left (Refl :: p :~: q)))
            = Fork
                x
                (t1' :: BraunTree (p + 1) a)
                (t2 :: BraunTree q a)
                (Right (sucCong Refl :: (p + 1) :~: (q + 1)))
            where
                t1' :: BraunTree (p + 1) a
                t1' = insert x (t1 :: BraunTree p a)
    • Relevant bindings include
        t1' :: BraunTree (n1 + 1) a
          (bound at /home/agnishom/test/typeExp/braun.hs:34:9)
        t1 :: BraunTree n1 a
          (bound at /home/agnishom/test/typeExp/braun.hs:31:19)
        insert :: a -> BraunTree n a -> BraunTree (n + 1) a
          (bound at /home/agnishom/test/typeExp/braun.hs:29:1)

I am not sure what I am doing wrong here. Also, why does haskell think that t1 :: BraunTree n1 a (in the error message), even though I have annotated t1 :: BraunTree p a?

Help with interpreting this error message would be very helpful

  • GHC's error messages are terrible for existential type variables. You can annotate them with whatever names you like, but error messages basically always show the internal name that GHC assigns (based off the name used in the constructor declaration). n1 and p are the same thing here, but p just doesn't appear in error messages. – HTNW Jul 11 '18 at 17:35
2

You could try to use this compiler plugin which infers type equalities for Nats for you automatically:

1

GHC does not know that addition is commutative and associative.

I get a slightly different error, after removing some type sigs. Here it's clear that all the same terms appear, but in a different order:

• Could not deduce: (((n1 + 1) + m) + 1) ~ (n + 1)
  from the context: n ~ ((n1 + m) + 1)

The original equation is equivalent, but inconsistently replaces m with n1.

Unfortunately, I'm not sure how to help GHC out if you stick with the built-in Nat. I'm pretty sure you can switch to your own Nat, and prove the necessary equality. I don't know if there is a suitable library of such theorems yet.

1

You have too many type signatures. It's very hard to read through them. Also, sucCong is not necessary. Let's just clean this up first:

insert :: a -> BraunTree n a -> BraunTree (n + 1) a
insert x Empty = Fork x Empty Empty (Left Refl)
insert x (Fork y t1 t2 (Left Refl)) = Fork x (insert x t1) t2 (Right Refl)
-- by matching on Refl       ^^^^ you already prove that p ~ q
-- and (p + 1) ~ (q + 1) just follows naturally (i.e. is Refl)       ^^^^
-- if you just bound the equality to a variable, then sucCong would be necessary
-- as it would match the variable to Refl "for" you.

The error is the same

Braun.hs:#:39: error:
    • Could not deduce: (((n1 + 1) + n1) + 1) ~ (n + 1)
      from the context: n ~ ((n1 + m) + 1)
        bound by a pattern with constructor:
                   Fork :: forall a (n :: Nat) (m :: Nat).
                           a
                           -> BraunTree n a
                           -> BraunTree m a
                           -> Either (n :~: m) (n :~: (m + 1))
                           -> BraunTree ((n + m) + 1) a,
                 in an equation for ‘insert’
        at Braun.hs:#:11-34
      or from: m ~ n1
        bound by a pattern with constructor:
                   Refl :: forall k (a :: k). a :~: a,
                 in an equation for ‘insert’
        at Braun.hs:#:30-33
      Expected type: BraunTree (n + 1) a
        Actual type: BraunTree (((n1 + 1) + m) + 1) a
      NB: ‘+’ is a non-injective type family
    • In the expression: Fork x (insert x t1) t2 (Right Refl)
      In an equation for ‘insert’:
          insert x (Fork y t1 t2 (Left Refl))
            = Fork x (insert x t1) t2 (Right Refl)
    • Relevant bindings include
        t1 :: BraunTree n1 a (bound at Braun.hs:#:18)
        insert :: a -> BraunTree n a -> BraunTree (n + 1) a
          (bound at Braun.hs:#:1)
  |
# | insert x (Fork y t1 t2 (Left Refl)) = Fork x (insert x t1) t2 (Right Refl)
  |                                       ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Per the bottom of the message, n1 is the index of t1, and you called it p. We also know that m (t2's index) is equal to p, and that n (the function argument) is equal to (p + m) + 1. Let's apply all the substitutions we can to the constraint that's failing:

(((n1 + 1) + n1) + 1) ~ (n + 1)
-- rename n1 to p
(((p + 1) + p) + 1) ~ (n + 1)
-- substitute n ~ (p + m) + 1
(((p + 1) + p) + 1) ~ (((p + m) + 1) + 1)
-- m ~ p
(((p + 1) + p) + 1) ~ (((p + p) + 1) + 1)

The issue is that GHC cannot prove that ((p + 1) + p) ~ ((p + p) + 1). If you had used a nicer Nat, one that wasn't built in to the compiler, it would be possible to prove that this is true yourself. As it is, the sanest idea is probably:

{-# LANGUAGE AllowAmbiguousTypes #-}
import Unsafe.Coerce
-- using TypeApplications usually means using AllowAmbiguousTypes

-- it is also possible to use a compiler plugin to "teach" GHC the laws
-- of arithmetic
-- by keeping the unsafeCoerce in these wrappers, you decrease the chance of
-- "proving" something that isn't actually true.
plusAssoc :: forall l m r. ((l + m) + r) :~: (l + (m + r))
plusAssoc = unsafeCoerce Refl
plusComm :: forall l r. (l + r) :~: (r + l)
plusComm = unsafeCoerce Refl

insert :: a -> BraunTree n a -> BraunTree (n + 1) a
insert x Empty = Fork x Empty Empty (Left Refl)
insert x (Fork y (t1 :: BraunTree p a) t2 (Left Refl)) =
  case plusAssoc @p @1 @p of Refl -> -- (p + 1) + p => p + (1 + p)
    case plusComm @1 @p of Refl -> -- p + (1 + p) => p + (p + 1)
      case plusAssoc @p @p @1 of Refl -> -- p + (p + 1) => (p + p) + 1
        Fork x (insert x t1) t2 (Right Refl)

A note: should BraunTree really have two constructors? There are essentially two kinds of Fork: a balanced one and an unbalanced one. It would make a lot more sense (and remove a bunch of indirection) to split Fork into two constructors. It would also be nicer because you would eliminate certain partially-defined values.

  • Thanks for the detailed explanation. What I do not understand is how the equation (((p + 1) + p) + 1) ~ (((p + p) + 1) + 1) arises. – Agnishom Chattopadhyay Jul 12 '18 at 3:13
  • The left hand side comes from the type of Fork. n + m + 1 becomes (p+1) + p + 1 because both subtrees have size p. The right hand side comes from the type of insert, which requires that the size of the tree grows by one. In that type, n is the size of the whole tree, (p + p) + 1. – bergey Jul 12 '18 at 17:03
  • You have a BraunTree p a on the right, and insert creates a BraunTree (p + 1) a for the left. Putting them under a Fork creates a BraunTree (((p + 1) + p) + 1) a . The type signature says that you are supposed to have a BraunTree (((p + p) + 1) + 1) a. You get a type mismatch because GHC can’t do algebra. EDIT: ninja’d. – HTNW Jul 12 '18 at 17:07

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