0

I have an inherited SQL Server query:

SELECT
    UPPER(ImportRecord.username) AS username,
    COUNT(*),
    'A'
FROM
    Billing.ImportRecord ImportRecord
GROUP BY
    UPPER(ImportRecord.username)

UNION

SELECT
    UPPER(ImportRecord.username) AS username,
    COUNT(*),
    'B'
FROM
    Billing.ImportRecord ImportRecord
INNER JOIN 
    Personnel.Personnel.Persons Persons ON UPPER(ImportRecord.username) = UPPER(Persons.username)
                                        AND ImportRecord.StartDate BETWEEN Persons.ActualStartDate 
                                        AND ISNULL(Persons.ActualEndDate, GETDATE())
INNER JOIN 
    Billing.UserAccount UserAccount ON Persons.PersonId = UserAccount.BeckmanPersonId
                                    AND ImportRecord.StartDate BETWEEN UserAccount.DateEffective 
                                    AND ISNULL(UserAccount.DateRevoked, GETDATE())
GROUP BY
    UPPER(ImportRecord.username)
ORDER BY
    1, 3, 2;

"ImportRecord" is a temp table that holds usage data collected from a number of sources.

"UserAccount" holds info about a user's billing state.

"Persons" holds general info on our people.

If I am lucky this query produces pairs of results: "A" records are the "raw" incoming records and "B" are the incoming records filtered through personnel and billing. Example output could be:

    ABLE    2   A
    ABLE    2   B
    BAKER   7   A
    BAKER   7   B
    CHARLIE 2   A
    CHARLIE 7   B
    DELTA   4   A
    ECHO    4   A
    ECHO    4   B

Notice that CHARLIE has an odd "B" record and DELTA only has an "A" records.

For now I have to comb through these by hand to look for differences -- and there could be hundreds of records. I could write a script to search for singleton records and pairs that have non-equal number values.

My question: is there a better way in SQL Server to approach this?

1

Try this, it will output all fields where there is only one value and when column 3 is different

SELECT  DISTINCT COLUMN1
        ,COUNT(COLUMN3)
FROM    TABLE1
GROUP BY    COLUMN1
            ,COLUMN2
HAVING   COUNT(COLUMN3) < 2
  • 1
    Beauty! had to swap the HAVING and GROUP BY clauses but good job! – 7 Reeds Jul 11 '18 at 19:39
  • happy to help ! I tried it in oracle and it did not mind HAVING before, but I edit it anyways. – luisarcher Jul 11 '18 at 19:51
0

Try the following:

WITH output_CTE (username, count, code)  
AS  
(  
    SELECT
       UPPER(ImportRecord.username) AS username,
       COUNT(*),
       'A'
FROM
    Billing.ImportRecord ImportRecord
GROUP BY
         UPPER(ImportRecord.username)
UNION
SELECT
       UPPER(ImportRecord.username) AS username,
       COUNT(*),
       'B'
FROM
     Billing.ImportRecord ImportRecord
     INNER JOIN Personnel.Personnel.Persons Persons
         ON UPPER(ImportRecord.username) = UPPER(Persons.username)
            AND ImportRecord.StartDate BETWEEN Persons.ActualStartDate 
                AND isnull(Persons.ActualEndDate, GETDATE())
     INNER JOIN Billing.UserAccount UserAccount
         ON Persons.PersonId = UserAccount.BeckmanPersonId
            AND ImportRecord.StartDate BETWEEN UserAccount.DateEffective 
                AND isnull(UserAccount.DateRevoked, GETDATE())
GROUP BY
         UPPER(ImportRecord.username)
ORDER BY
         1, 3, 2
)  
SELECT 
*
FROM 
  (Select * from output_CTE where code = 'A') as A
Full outer join 
  Output_CTE as B on B.code = 'B'
Where 
  A.code is null or B.code is null
  Or A.count <> B.count;
GO  

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