Background: I try to move a files to another location and want to rename them, if the file already exists. There are multiple processes that move files, with the same name, at the same time.

Normally I would use this approach:

string oldPath = @"smth1";
string newPath = @"smth";

if (File.Exists(newPath))
{
    filename = GetNewFilename(newPath);
}

//Problem, if file gets created here!!!*

File.Move(oldPath, newPath);

If I try to move the file and another process creates a file with the same name at the (*) moment, I get an IOException. Problem here is that there is no specific "FileAlreadyExistsException" that I can catch.

Am I missing something here, or is there any other way to solve this problem?

  • Have it retry if it throws an exception? – Scriven Jul 11 at 20:07
  • @Scriven or File.Exists again on exception – Steve Jul 11 at 20:07
  • @Scriven Problem is, that the IOException also gets thrown, if the source file doesn't exist, the path is to long, or other stuff. – 8ungGamer Jul 11 at 20:10
  • @Steve I was thinking if it happened once, it could happen again. Possibly a counter or something so it doesn't retry forever, and create a log entry on failure, then continue on – Scriven Jul 11 at 20:10
  • @Scriven I don't really like this approach, because in theory this could happen very often (10-100 times probably). – 8ungGamer Jul 11 at 20:14
up vote 1 down vote accepted

well you can handle all the possible errors that can be thrown if you want to be certain.

        try
        {
            File.Move(oldPath, newPath);
        }
        catch (ArgumentNullException)
        {
            //source of dest filename is null
        }
        catch(ArgumentException)
        {
            //source or dest file name/path not valid
        }
        catch(UnauthorizedAccessException)
        {
            //no permission
        }
        catch (DirectoryNotFoundException)
        {
            //dir not found
        }
        catch(PathTooLongException)
        {
            //path too long
        }
        catch(NotSupportedException)
        {
            //source or desk name is invalid format
        }
        catch (IOException)
        {
            if (File.Exists(newPath))
                //file exists
            else if (!File.Exists(oldPath))
                //old path does not exist
            else
                //Unknown error
        }

you can find all the possible ones on MSDN

  • whoever downvoted this mind explain? – Steve Jul 11 at 22:00
  • I don't know who downvoted but I pushed it back up one. If this isn't a good answer then the question isn't formatted well IMO. – Michael Puckett II Jul 11 at 22:17

Try to create the file at the beginning. If that doesn't work then you know that it already exists. If it does work then instead of moving the existing file, you would want to copy the old file into the new one and then delete the old one. That way you never have to lose hold of that new file that you created.

  • I'm pretty sure, I would run into the same problem as i mentioned in the comment, because if i create the file and it fails, I don't know if this is because the file already existed or the path is to long or ... . – 8ungGamer Jul 11 at 20:18
  • But you could use that pattern and catch PathTooLongException (or the various others). – bwmartens Jul 11 at 20:45

You can create a static field in your class and use lock statement to ensure that only one thread can create or rename a file and consequently other threads cannot create a file with the same name.

lock(_lockObject)
{
    //rename or create your file here
}
  • This only fixes your application from accessing it. If there are other processes then moving files then a lock isn't good. The OP states other processes are moving files, not threads, so I don't believe this is the answer. – Michael Puckett II Jul 11 at 22:19

When using File.Move the IOException is thrown if the file already exists or if the original file isn't found; so there's that.

If you're getting this exception you need to have an algorithm in place, such as a counter appending on file name or similar, that reattempts it. I would add a measure of maximum attempts so that, in the event it just can't succeed for any reason, it will break out.

However, during this recursive attempt to move the file I suggest checking both that the source file exists and the destination file does not exist on each attempt. I also would only reattempt if you do indeed get the IOException specifically; with all other exceptions do other work accordingly.

  • Good point that the specific IOException only gets thrown if the File already exists or of the source is missing. – 8ungGamer Jul 12 at 3:48

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