I am trying to create a simple game that is played best of five and where team B has a 60% chance of winning each round. Further, I want to simulate each game played X amount of times.

Ideally I would - after I have ran all the simulations - be able to access what happened in each simulation. E.g. who won the first round, who won the second etc in the most efficient way possible.

My idea was that I could append all of the data from the classes in a list and then access each one afterward. However, it doesn't work unless you append an actual value.

Below is a somewhat simplified example of the code:

class Game(object):

    def add_values(self):
        if random.random() > 0.6:
            Team.scoreA+=1
        else:
            Team.scoreB+=1

    def check_if_end(self):
        end = 0
        if max(Team.scoreA,Team.scoreB) == 3: end = 1
        return end

import random

class Team(object):

    def oriscore(self):
        Team.scoreA = 0
        Team.scoreB = 0

objdata = []
antsim = 200
for a in range(antsim):
    Team.oriscore(1)

    for i in range(5):
        Game.add_values(1)
        end = Game.check_if_end(1)
        if end == 1:
            objdata.append(Team)
            break

for i in objdata:
    print(i.scoreA,i.scoreB)

Printing out the below values will simply just show the result from the last simulation only. Whereas I want the result from each simulation.

In this specific game I could ofc just change it so that I append both scoreA and scoreB, however that doesn't seem so scaleable. So I wonder if there is a more efficient way.

Thanks in advance.

  • Is there a reason you're using class attributes for all of your values, and not using self anywhere? The way this is written, your classes aren't really doing anything useful—and that will make solving your problem harder. – abarnert Jul 11 at 23:00
  • In fact, if you wrote this on a more normal OO style, and took advantage of those classes, your problem would solve itself. You would, e.g., construct a new team = Team() and game = Game(team) each time through the loop, so objdata.append(team) would be building up a list of 200 different objects, instead of a list of the same object 200 times. – abarnert Jul 11 at 23:05
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your root problem here is that you aren't creating any instances. The only objects in your program (besides a few numbers) are the classes themselves. So you don't have anything to store in your list but the Test class object, which you append over and over, so you end up with a list of the same class object (which you keep on mutating) 200 times in a row.

What you want to do is create 200 instances Team instances, and store the attributes on those instances, and then you can have 200 separate objects in the list.

First, you have to make Team into a class that stores values on its instances:

class Team(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.scoreA = 0
        self.scoreB = 0

Now you have to do the same to Game. And, because each Game has to work with a Team, you need to give it one:

class Game(object):
    def __init__(self, team):
        self.team = team

    def add_values(self):
        if random.random() > 0.6:
            self.team.scoreA += 1
        else:
            self.team.scoreB += 1

    def check_if_end(self):
        end = 0
        if max(self.team.scoreA, self.team.scoreB) == 3: end = 1
        return end

And now, your loop can create the separate instances. And then you can call methods on those instances, instead of calling them on the class and passing 1 as a fake self:

objdata = []
antsim = 200
for a in range(antsim):
    team = Team()   

    for i in range(5):
        game = Game(team)
        game.add_values()
        end = game.check_if_end()
        if end == 1:
            objdata.append(team)
            break

And now, instead of a list of 200 references to the Team class object, you have a list of 200 different team instances:

for team in objdata:
    print(team.scoreA, team.scoreB)
  • Good answer. The self.team = team solves a lot of issues. – MathiasRa Jul 12 at 0:24

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