122

Does anyone know how to convert JS dateTime to MySQL datetime? Also is there a way to add a specific number of minutes to JS datetime and then pass it to MySQL datetime?

11 Answers 11

87

While JS does possess enough basic tools to do this, it's pretty clunky.

/**
 * You first need to create a formatting function to pad numbers to two digits…
 **/
function twoDigits(d) {
    if(0 <= d && d < 10) return "0" + d.toString();
    if(-10 < d && d < 0) return "-0" + (-1*d).toString();
    return d.toString();
}

/**
 * …and then create the method to output the date string as desired.
 * Some people hate using prototypes this way, but if you are going
 * to apply this to more than one Date object, having it as a prototype
 * makes sense.
 **/
Date.prototype.toMysqlFormat = function() {
    return this.getUTCFullYear() + "-" + twoDigits(1 + this.getUTCMonth()) + "-" + twoDigits(this.getUTCDate()) + " " + twoDigits(this.getUTCHours()) + ":" + twoDigits(this.getUTCMinutes()) + ":" + twoDigits(this.getUTCSeconds());
};
  • How do you call a function like this with a variable? – Catfish Mar 12 '13 at 4:50
  • 1
    @Catfish You mean with a specific date? You use a Date object. new Date().toMysqlFormat() or new Date(2014,12,14).toMysqlFormat() or whatever. – kojiro Mar 12 '13 at 12:36
  • 15
    This answer had its day while JavaScript was old and clunky. If you target a modern browser, I recommend Gajus' toISOString approach. – kojiro Dec 18 '13 at 16:18
301
var date;
date = new Date();
date = date.getUTCFullYear() + '-' +
    ('00' + (date.getUTCMonth()+1)).slice(-2) + '-' +
    ('00' + date.getUTCDate()).slice(-2) + ' ' + 
    ('00' + date.getUTCHours()).slice(-2) + ':' + 
    ('00' + date.getUTCMinutes()).slice(-2) + ':' + 
    ('00' + date.getUTCSeconds()).slice(-2);
console.log(date);

or even shorter:

new Date().toISOString().slice(0, 19).replace('T', ' ');

Output:

2012-06-22 05:40:06

For more advanced use cases, including controlling the timezone, consider using http://momentjs.com/:

require('moment')().format('YYYY-MM-DD HH:mm:ss');

For a lightweight alternative to , consider https://github.com/taylorhakes/fecha

require('fecha').format('YYYY-MM-DD HH:mm:ss')
  • You have an extra opening parenthesis before date.getUTCDate, and yes this is better. – Adam Lockhart Apr 9 '13 at 16:42
  • 27
    this will give problem due to timezone – Mr Coder Mar 20 '14 at 3:11
  • 3
    It throws away the timezone setting, how to keep it? – shapeare Nov 17 '14 at 17:25
  • 2
    combo it up with this to take care of the timezone: stackoverflow.com/questions/11887934/… – chiliNUT Jul 6 '15 at 23:29
  • 2
    Full workaround with timezone oneliner!! var d = new Date(); d.toISOString().split('T')[0]+' '+d.toTimeString().split(' ')[0]; – Paulo Roberto Rosa Sep 28 '18 at 19:20
68

I think the solution can be less clunky by using method toISOString(), it has a wide browser compatibility.

So your expression will be a one-liner:

new Date().toISOString().slice(0, 19).replace('T', ' ');

The generated output:

"2017-06-29 17:54:04"

  • 2
    Works brilliantly! new Date(1091040026000).toISOString().slice(0, 19).replace('T', ' '); – John Aug 26 '17 at 18:27
  • 5
    Great, only one issue here: the more clunky methods will be getting the hour, day, month (even year) after application of the js Date's time zone offset. Whereas yours returns the underlying UTC time in MySQL DATETIME format. In most cases storing the UTC may be better, and in either case your data table should probably give location info in one field. Alternatively, to convert to local time is pretty easy: use ... - Date.getTimezoneOffset() * 60 * 1000 (NB also adjusts for Daylight Saving Time where applicable). – mike rodent Aug 28 '17 at 17:38
12

JS time value for MySQL

var datetime = new Date().toLocaleString();

OR

const DATE_FORMATER = require( 'dateformat' );
var datetime = DATE_FORMATER( new Date(), "yyyy-mm-dd HH:MM:ss" );

OR

const MOMENT= require( 'moment' );
let datetime = MOMENT().format( 'YYYY-MM-DD  HH:mm:ss.000' );

you can send this in params its will work.

9

For arbitrary date string,

// Your default date object  
var starttime = new Date();
// Get the iso time (GMT 0 == UTC 0)
var isotime = new Date((new Date(starttime)).toISOString() );
// getTime() is the unix time value, in milliseconds.
// getTimezoneOffset() is UTC time and local time in minutes.
// 60000 = 60*1000 converts getTimezoneOffset() from minutes to milliseconds. 
var fixedtime = new Date(isotime.getTime()-(starttime.getTimezoneOffset()*60000));
// toISOString() is always 24 characters long: YYYY-MM-DDTHH:mm:ss.sssZ.
// .slice(0, 19) removes the last 5 chars, ".sssZ",which is (UTC offset).
// .replace('T', ' ') removes the pad between the date and time.
var formatedMysqlString = fixedtime.toISOString().slice(0, 19).replace('T', ' ');
console.log( formatedMysqlString );

Or a single line solution,

var formatedMysqlString = (new Date ((new Date((new Date(new Date())).toISOString() )).getTime() - ((new Date()).getTimezoneOffset()*60000))).toISOString().slice(0, 19).replace('T', ' ');
console.log( formatedMysqlString );

This solution also works for Node.js when using Timestamp in mysql.

@Gajus Kuizinas's first answer seems to modify mozilla's toISOString prototype

4

The venerable DateJS library has a formatting routine (it overrides ".toString()"). You could also do one yourself pretty easily because the "Date" methods give you all the numbers you need.

4

Full workaround (to mantain the timezone) using @Gajus answer concept:

var d = new Date(),
    finalDate = d.toISOString().split('T')[0]+' '+d.toTimeString().split(' ')[0];
console.log(finalDate); //2018-09-28 16:19:34 --example output
2

new Date().toISOString().slice(0, 10)+" "+new Date().toLocaleTimeString('en-GB');

100% working

  • Are there no other lines of code on this? – Nelles Feb 1 at 11:20
  • no... try this. it will work – Nirbhay Kumar Feb 10 at 8:38
0

I have given simple JavaScript date format examples please check the bellow code

var data = new Date($.now()); // without jquery remove this $.now()
console.log(data)// Thu Jun 23 2016 15:48:24 GMT+0530 (IST)

var d = new Date,
    dformat = [d.getFullYear() ,d.getMonth()+1,
               d.getDate()
               ].join('-')+' '+
              [d.getHours(),
               d.getMinutes(),
               d.getSeconds()].join(':');

console.log(dformat) //2016-6-23 15:54:16

Using momentjs

var date = moment().format('YYYY-MM-DD H:mm:ss');

console.log(date) // 2016-06-23 15:59:08

Example please check https://jsfiddle.net/sjy3vjwm/2/

  • I just tried your first code with vanilla javascript and it gives me this result: 2018-4-20 15:11:23. You are not padding the numbers with a leading "0". Also, I don't know about momentjs but don't you have to put "HH" for hour so that it pads it? Maybe that's why you got down voted? (itwasntme) – Alex Apr 20 '18 at 20:16
0

The easiest correct way to convert JS Date to SQL datetime format that occur to me is this one. It correctly handles timezone offset.

const toSqlDatetime = (inputDate) => {
    const date = new Date(inputDate)
    const dateWithOffest = new Date(date.getTime() - (date.getTimezoneOffset() * 60000))
    return dateWithOffest
        .toISOString()
        .slice(0, 19)
        .replace('T', ' ')
}

toSqlDatetime(new Date()) // 2019-08-07 11:58:57
toSqlDatetime(new Date('2016-6-23 1:54:16')) // 2016-06-23 01:54:16

Beware that @Paulo Roberto answer will produce incorrect results at the turn on new day (i can't leave comments). For example:

var d = new Date('2016-6-23 1:54:16'),
    finalDate = d.toISOString().split('T')[0]+' '+d.toTimeString().split(' ')[0];
console.log(finalDate); // 2016-06-22 01:54:16 

We've got 22 June instead of 23!

0
var _t = new Date();

if you want UTC format simply

_t.toLocaleString('indian', { timeZone: 'UTC' }).replace(/(\w+)\/(\w+)\/(\w+), (\w+)/, '$3-$2-$1 $4');

or

_t.toISOString().slice(0, 19).replace('T', ' ');

and if want in specific timezone then

_t.toLocaleString('indian', { timeZone: 'asia/kolkata' }).replace(/(\w+)\/(\w+)\/(\w+), (\w+)/, '$3-$2-$1 $4');

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