While looking at the source code of the Comparators class, I came across these lines of code.

class Comparators {

    //...

    enum NaturalOrderComparator implements Comparator<Comparable<Object>> {
        INSTANCE;

        @Override
        public int compare(Comparable<Object> c1, Comparable<Object> c2) {
            return c1.compareTo(c2);
        }

        @Override
        public Comparator<Comparable<Object>> reversed() {
            return Comparator.reverseOrder();
        }
    }

    //...

}

I think I understand what this does. It's a Singleton instance which implements the Comparator interface. It uses the "compareTo" of classes that implement the Comparable interface for natural ordering (please correct me if I am wrong in any of this).

What I do not understand however, why is it done using an enum. I really like enums for Singletons, don't get me wrong but in this case I personally think this would have been simpler:

public static final Comparator<Comparable<Object>> NATURAL_ORDER_COMPARATOR =
    new Comparator<Comparable<Object>>() {
        @Override
        public int compare(Comparable<Object> c1, Comparable<Object> c2) {
            return c1.compareTo(c2);
        }

        //...

    }

Are there any reasons to implement this using enums aside from personal preference?

  • 1
    Did you forget final in the last declaration? Also, can you explain why you think the second option is simpler? – ernest_k Jul 12 at 6:30
  • @ernest_k yeah the "final" got lost but it's fixed now. – Yeater Jul 12 at 9:37
  • 3
    @ernest_k I think my option is simpler because: * enums inside of classes are not very common * enums implementing interfaces are not very common * implementing functional interfaces as enums is even more uncommon * arguably less code * shorter access using "NATURAL_ORDER_COMPARATOR" instead of NaturalOrderComparator.INSTANCE – Yeater Jul 12 at 9:45
up vote 14 down vote accepted

It maybe due to Serializable.

Based on your approach, if you create an object that holds the Comparators.NATURAL_ORDER_COMPARATOR, when you write to the object and read it back, a new NATURAL_ORDER_COMPARATOR will be created. Since the object cost is so small it breaks the singleton.

Some evidence for that is Collections.ReverseComparator. It uses your approach:

static final ReverseComparator REVERSE_ORDER = new ReverseComparator();

But the drawback is that the following code must be present to maintain the singleton

private Object readResolve() { return Collections.reverseOrder(); }

Now which one is easier? Personally, I prefer to use 'enum singleton' pattern as my first choice.

  • Then the question comes - why do they not do it for reverse comparator? – Jai Jul 12 at 8:38
  • It's just because jdk guys not update the old pattern. I checked openjdk history, the Collections.ReverseComparator was added 11 years ago (may be more early). But the Comparators.natrualOrder is marked @since 1.8, it was added 5 years ago. – Dean Xu Jul 12 at 8:48
  • @Jai Perhaps the real question would be why they didn't refactor/move ReverseComparator when they introduced Comparators in java 8, but they are very reluctant to introduce change that is not strictly required. – Hulk Jul 12 at 8:50
  • @Hulk that is exactly the point, there are many more changes like this that could have been done, but they are seen as low priority... and indeed it is low – Eugene Jul 12 at 8:51
  • 1
    @Jai without it being Serializable, collections with such a comparator (like e.g. TreeMap) could no longer be serializable. – Hulk Jul 12 at 8:59

That is exactly the point in Item 89: For instance control, prefer enum types to readResolve from Effective Java actually and it has to do with Serialization.

Maintaining readResolve instead of the enum instance is much more complicated and cumbersome.

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