If your application requires a database and it comes with built in data, what is the best way to ship that application? Should I:

  1. Precreate the SQLite database and include it in the .apk?

  2. Include the SQL commands with the application and have it create the database and insert the data on first use?

The drawbacks I see are:

  1. Possible SQLite version mismatches might cause problems and I currently don't know where the database should go and how to access it.

  2. It may take a really long time to create and populate the database on the device.

Any suggestions? Pointers to the documentation regarding any issues would be greatly appreciated.

16 Answers 16

up vote 442 down vote accepted

I just found a way to do this in ReignDesign blog in an article titled Using your own SQLite database in Android applications. Basically you precreate your database, put it in your assets directory in your apk, and on first use copy to /data/data/YOUR_PACKAGE/databases/ directory.

  • 9
    Nice link. This looks faster than INSERTing every row into a database, but you still have the "duplicate databse" issue. There will be two copies of the database, one in the .apk and one in the filesystem. – Will Mar 6 '09 at 23:17
  • 12
    This causes your app to have two databases consuming space, right? – gonzobrains Aug 30 '11 at 15:34
  • 30
    Don't forget to use Context.getDatabasePath instead of hard-coding the path. – sargas Jul 29 '12 at 1:35
  • 169
    This code from that blog post is old, outdated, dreadful (concatenation to create file paths?), and problematic (I'm tired of seeing developer questions about trying to get it to work). Please, just use SQLiteAssetHelper: github.com/jgilfelt/android-sqlite-asset-helper – CommonsWare Jul 10 '13 at 23:11
  • 10
    @CommonsWare's proposed solution in his comment is by far the best solution. Just extending your SQLiteOpenHelper from SQliteAssetHelper in that library, and provide the database files and the upgrade scripts in the assets folder. It couldn't be easier! – Christian García Nov 7 '13 at 17:53

There are two options for creating and updating databases.

One is to create a database externally, then place it in the assets folder of the project and then copy the entire database from there. This is much quicker if the database has a lot of tables and other components. Upgrades are triggered by changing the database version number in the res/values/strings.xml file. Upgrades would then be accomplished by creating a new database externally, replacing the old database in the assets folder with the new database, saving the old database in internal storage under another name, copying the new database from the assets folder into internal storage, transferring all of the data from the old database (that was renamed earlier) into the new database and finally deleting the old database. You can create a database originally by using the SQLite Manager FireFox plugin to execute your creation sql statements.

The other option is to create a database internally from a sql file. This is not as quick but the delay would probably be unnoticeable to the users if the database has only a few tables. Upgrades are triggered by changing the database version number in the res/values/strings.xml file. Upgrades would then be accomplished by processing an upgrade sql file. The data in the database will remain unchanged except when its container is removed, for example dropping a table.

The example below demonstrates how to use either method.

Here is a sample create_database.sql file. It is to be placed in the assets folder of the project for the internal method or copied into the "Execute SQL' of SQLite Manager to create the database for the external method. (NOTE: Notice the comment about the table required by Android.)

--Android requires a table named 'android_metadata' with a 'locale' column
CREATE TABLE "android_metadata" ("locale" TEXT DEFAULT 'en_US');
INSERT INTO "android_metadata" VALUES ('en_US');

CREATE TABLE "kitchen_table";
CREATE TABLE "coffee_table";
CREATE TABLE "pool_table";
CREATE TABLE "dining_room_table";
CREATE TABLE "card_table"; 

Here is a sample update_database.sql file. It is to be placed in the assets folder of the project for the internal method or copied into the "Execute SQL' of SQLite Manager to create the database for the external method. (NOTE: Notice that all three types of SQL comments will be ignored by the sql parser that is included in this example.)

--CREATE TABLE "kitchen_table";  This is one type of comment in sql.  It is ignored by parseSql.
/*
 * CREATE TABLE "coffee_table"; This is a second type of comment in sql.  It is ignored by parseSql.
 */
{
CREATE TABLE "pool_table";  This is a third type of comment in sql.  It is ignored by parseSql.
}
/* CREATE TABLE "dining_room_table"; This is a second type of comment in sql.  It is ignored by parseSql. */
{ CREATE TABLE "card_table"; This is a third type of comment in sql.  It is ignored by parseSql. }

--DROP TABLE "picnic_table"; Uncomment this if picnic table was previously created and now is being replaced.
CREATE TABLE "picnic_table" ("plates" TEXT);
INSERT INTO "picnic_table" VALUES ('paper');

Here is an entry to add to the /res/values/strings.xml file for the database version number.

<item type="string" name="databaseVersion" format="integer">1</item>

Here is an activity that accesses the database and then uses it. (Note: You might want to run the database code in a separate thread if it uses a lot of resources.)

package android.example;

import android.app.Activity;
import android.database.sqlite.SQLiteDatabase;
import android.os.Bundle;

/**
 * @author Danny Remington - MacroSolve
 * 
 *         Activity for demonstrating how to use a sqlite database.
 */
public class Database extends Activity {
     /** Called when the activity is first created. */
     @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.main);
        DatabaseHelper myDbHelper;
        SQLiteDatabase myDb = null;

        myDbHelper = new DatabaseHelper(this);
        /*
         * Database must be initialized before it can be used. This will ensure
         * that the database exists and is the current version.
         */
         myDbHelper.initializeDataBase();

         try {
            // A reference to the database can be obtained after initialization.
            myDb = myDbHelper.getWritableDatabase();
            /*
             * Place code to use database here.
             */
         } catch (Exception ex) {
            ex.printStackTrace();
         } finally {
            try {
                myDbHelper.close();
            } catch (Exception ex) {
                ex.printStackTrace();
            } finally {
                myDb.close();
            }
        }

    }
}

Here is the database helper class where the database is created or updated if necessary. (NOTE: Android requires that you create a class that extends SQLiteOpenHelper in order to work with a Sqlite database.)

package android.example;

import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.io.OutputStream;

import android.content.Context;
import android.database.sqlite.SQLiteDatabase;
import android.database.sqlite.SQLiteOpenHelper;

/**
 * @author Danny Remington - MacroSolve
 * 
 *         Helper class for sqlite database.
 */
public class DatabaseHelper extends SQLiteOpenHelper {

    /*
     * The Android's default system path of the application database in internal
     * storage. The package of the application is part of the path of the
     * directory.
     */
    private static String DB_DIR = "/data/data/android.example/databases/";
    private static String DB_NAME = "database.sqlite";
    private static String DB_PATH = DB_DIR + DB_NAME;
    private static String OLD_DB_PATH = DB_DIR + "old_" + DB_NAME;

    private final Context myContext;

    private boolean createDatabase = false;
    private boolean upgradeDatabase = false;

    /**
     * Constructor Takes and keeps a reference of the passed context in order to
     * access to the application assets and resources.
     * 
     * @param context
     */
    public DatabaseHelper(Context context) {
        super(context, DB_NAME, null, context.getResources().getInteger(
                R.string.databaseVersion));
        myContext = context;
        // Get the path of the database that is based on the context.
        DB_PATH = myContext.getDatabasePath(DB_NAME).getAbsolutePath();
    }

    /**
     * Upgrade the database in internal storage if it exists but is not current. 
     * Create a new empty database in internal storage if it does not exist.
     */
    public void initializeDataBase() {
        /*
         * Creates or updates the database in internal storage if it is needed
         * before opening the database. In all cases opening the database copies
         * the database in internal storage to the cache.
         */
        getWritableDatabase();

        if (createDatabase) {
            /*
             * If the database is created by the copy method, then the creation
             * code needs to go here. This method consists of copying the new
             * database from assets into internal storage and then caching it.
             */
            try {
                /*
                 * Write over the empty data that was created in internal
                 * storage with the one in assets and then cache it.
                 */
                copyDataBase();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                throw new Error("Error copying database");
            }
        } else if (upgradeDatabase) {
            /*
             * If the database is upgraded by the copy and reload method, then
             * the upgrade code needs to go here. This method consists of
             * renaming the old database in internal storage, create an empty
             * new database in internal storage, copying the database from
             * assets to the new database in internal storage, caching the new
             * database from internal storage, loading the data from the old
             * database into the new database in the cache and then deleting the
             * old database from internal storage.
             */
            try {
                FileHelper.copyFile(DB_PATH, OLD_DB_PATH);
                copyDataBase();
                SQLiteDatabase old_db = SQLiteDatabase.openDatabase(OLD_DB_PATH, null, SQLiteDatabase.OPEN_READWRITE);
                SQLiteDatabase new_db = SQLiteDatabase.openDatabase(DB_PATH,null, SQLiteDatabase.OPEN_READWRITE);
                /*
                 * Add code to load data into the new database from the old
                 * database and then delete the old database from internal
                 * storage after all data has been transferred.
                 */
            } catch (IOException e) {
                throw new Error("Error copying database");
            }
        }

    }

    /**
     * Copies your database from your local assets-folder to the just created
     * empty database in the system folder, from where it can be accessed and
     * handled. This is done by transfering bytestream.
     * */
    private void copyDataBase() throws IOException {
        /*
         * Close SQLiteOpenHelper so it will commit the created empty database
         * to internal storage.
         */
        close();

        /*
         * Open the database in the assets folder as the input stream.
         */
        InputStream myInput = myContext.getAssets().open(DB_NAME);

        /*
         * Open the empty db in interal storage as the output stream.
         */
        OutputStream myOutput = new FileOutputStream(DB_PATH);

        /*
         * Copy over the empty db in internal storage with the database in the
         * assets folder.
         */
        FileHelper.copyFile(myInput, myOutput);

        /*
         * Access the copied database so SQLiteHelper will cache it and mark it
         * as created.
         */
        getWritableDatabase().close();
    }

    /*
     * This is where the creation of tables and the initial population of the
     * tables should happen, if a database is being created from scratch instead
     * of being copied from the application package assets. Copying a database
     * from the application package assets to internal storage inside this
     * method will result in a corrupted database.
     * <P>
     * NOTE: This method is normally only called when a database has not already
     * been created. When the database has been copied, then this method is
     * called the first time a reference to the database is retrieved after the
     * database is copied since the database last cached by SQLiteOpenHelper is
     * different than the database in internal storage.
     */
    @Override
    public void onCreate(SQLiteDatabase db) {
        /*
         * Signal that a new database needs to be copied. The copy process must
         * be performed after the database in the cache has been closed causing
         * it to be committed to internal storage. Otherwise the database in
         * internal storage will not have the same creation timestamp as the one
         * in the cache causing the database in internal storage to be marked as
         * corrupted.
         */
        createDatabase = true;

        /*
         * This will create by reading a sql file and executing the commands in
         * it.
         */
            // try {
            // InputStream is = myContext.getResources().getAssets().open(
            // "create_database.sql");
            //
            // String[] statements = FileHelper.parseSqlFile(is);
            //
            // for (String statement : statements) {
            // db.execSQL(statement);
            // }
            // } catch (Exception ex) {
            // ex.printStackTrace();
            // }
    }

    /**
     * Called only if version number was changed and the database has already
     * been created. Copying a database from the application package assets to
     * the internal data system inside this method will result in a corrupted
     * database in the internal data system.
     */
    @Override
    public void onUpgrade(SQLiteDatabase db, int oldVersion, int newVersion) {
        /*
         * Signal that the database needs to be upgraded for the copy method of
         * creation. The copy process must be performed after the database has
         * been opened or the database will be corrupted.
         */
        upgradeDatabase = true;

        /*
         * Code to update the database via execution of sql statements goes
         * here.
         */

        /*
         * This will upgrade by reading a sql file and executing the commands in
         * it.
         */
        // try {
        // InputStream is = myContext.getResources().getAssets().open(
        // "upgrade_database.sql");
        //
        // String[] statements = FileHelper.parseSqlFile(is);
        //
        // for (String statement : statements) {
        // db.execSQL(statement);
        // }
        // } catch (Exception ex) {
        // ex.printStackTrace();
        // }
    }

    /**
     * Called everytime the database is opened by getReadableDatabase or
     * getWritableDatabase. This is called after onCreate or onUpgrade is
     * called.
     */
    @Override
    public void onOpen(SQLiteDatabase db) {
        super.onOpen(db);
    }

    /*
     * Add your public helper methods to access and get content from the
     * database. You could return cursors by doing
     * "return myDataBase.query(....)" so it'd be easy to you to create adapters
     * for your views.
     */

}

Here's the FileHelper class that contains methods for byte stream copying files and parsing sql files.

package android.example;

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileInputStream;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.FileReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.io.OutputStream;
import java.io.Reader;
import java.nio.channels.FileChannel;

/**
 * @author Danny Remington - MacroSolve
 * 
 *         Helper class for common tasks using files.
 * 
 */
public class FileHelper {
    /**
     * Creates the specified <i><b>toFile</b></i> that is a byte for byte a copy
     * of <i><b>fromFile</b></i>. If <i><b>toFile</b></i> already existed, then
     * it will be replaced with a copy of <i><b>fromFile</b></i>. The name and
     * path of <i><b>toFile</b></i> will be that of <i><b>toFile</b></i>. Both
     * <i><b>fromFile</b></i> and <i><b>toFile</b></i> will be closed by this
     * operation.
     * 
     * @param fromFile
     *            - InputStream for the file to copy from.
     * @param toFile
     *            - InputStream for the file to copy to.
     */
    public static void copyFile(InputStream fromFile, OutputStream toFile) throws IOException {
        // transfer bytes from the inputfile to the outputfile
        byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
        int length;

        try {
            while ((length = fromFile.read(buffer)) > 0) {
                toFile.write(buffer, 0, length);
            }
        }
        // Close the streams
        finally {
            try {
                if (toFile != null) {
                    try {
                        toFile.flush();
                    } finally {
                        toFile.close();
                    }
            }
            } finally {
                if (fromFile != null) {
                    fromFile.close();
                }
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * Creates the specified <i><b>toFile</b></i> that is a byte for byte a copy
     * of <i><b>fromFile</b></i>. If <i><b>toFile</b></i> already existed, then
     * it will be replaced with a copy of <i><b>fromFile</b></i>. The name and
     * path of <i><b>toFile</b></i> will be that of <i><b>toFile</b></i>. Both
     * <i><b>fromFile</b></i> and <i><b>toFile</b></i> will be closed by this
     * operation.
     * 
     * @param fromFile
     *            - String specifying the path of the file to copy from.
     * @param toFile
     *            - String specifying the path of the file to copy to.
     */
    public static void copyFile(String fromFile, String toFile) throws IOException {
        copyFile(new FileInputStream(fromFile), new FileOutputStream(toFile));
    }

    /**
     * Creates the specified <i><b>toFile</b></i> that is a byte for byte a copy
     * of <i><b>fromFile</b></i>. If <i><b>toFile</b></i> already existed, then
     * it will be replaced with a copy of <i><b>fromFile</b></i>. The name and
     * path of <i><b>toFile</b></i> will be that of <i><b>toFile</b></i>. Both
     * <i><b>fromFile</b></i> and <i><b>toFile</b></i> will be closed by this
     * operation.
     * 
     * @param fromFile
     *            - File for the file to copy from.
     * @param toFile
     *            - File for the file to copy to.
     */
    public static void copyFile(File fromFile, File toFile) throws IOException {
        copyFile(new FileInputStream(fromFile), new FileOutputStream(toFile));
    }

    /**
     * Creates the specified <i><b>toFile</b></i> that is a byte for byte a copy
     * of <i><b>fromFile</b></i>. If <i><b>toFile</b></i> already existed, then
     * it will be replaced with a copy of <i><b>fromFile</b></i>. The name and
     * path of <i><b>toFile</b></i> will be that of <i><b>toFile</b></i>. Both
     * <i><b>fromFile</b></i> and <i><b>toFile</b></i> will be closed by this
     * operation.
     * 
     * @param fromFile
     *            - FileInputStream for the file to copy from.
     * @param toFile
     *            - FileInputStream for the file to copy to.
     */
    public static void copyFile(FileInputStream fromFile, FileOutputStream toFile) throws IOException {
        FileChannel fromChannel = fromFile.getChannel();
        FileChannel toChannel = toFile.getChannel();

        try {
            fromChannel.transferTo(0, fromChannel.size(), toChannel);
        } finally {
            try {
                if (fromChannel != null) {
                    fromChannel.close();
                }
            } finally {
                if (toChannel != null) {
                    toChannel.close();
                }
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * Parses a file containing sql statements into a String array that contains
     * only the sql statements. Comments and white spaces in the file are not
     * parsed into the String array. Note the file must not contained malformed
     * comments and all sql statements must end with a semi-colon ";" in order
     * for the file to be parsed correctly. The sql statements in the String
     * array will not end with a semi-colon ";".
     * 
     * @param sqlFile
     *            - String containing the path for the file that contains sql
     *            statements.
     * 
     * @return String array containing the sql statements.
     */
    public static String[] parseSqlFile(String sqlFile) throws IOException {
        return parseSqlFile(new BufferedReader(new FileReader(sqlFile)));
    }

    /**
     * Parses a file containing sql statements into a String array that contains
     * only the sql statements. Comments and white spaces in the file are not
     * parsed into the String array. Note the file must not contained malformed
     * comments and all sql statements must end with a semi-colon ";" in order
     * for the file to be parsed correctly. The sql statements in the String
     * array will not end with a semi-colon ";".
     * 
     * @param sqlFile
     *            - InputStream for the file that contains sql statements.
     * 
     * @return String array containing the sql statements.
     */
    public static String[] parseSqlFile(InputStream sqlFile) throws IOException {
        return parseSqlFile(new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(sqlFile)));
    }

    /**
     * Parses a file containing sql statements into a String array that contains
     * only the sql statements. Comments and white spaces in the file are not
     * parsed into the String array. Note the file must not contained malformed
     * comments and all sql statements must end with a semi-colon ";" in order
     * for the file to be parsed correctly. The sql statements in the String
     * array will not end with a semi-colon ";".
     * 
     * @param sqlFile
     *            - Reader for the file that contains sql statements.
     * 
     * @return String array containing the sql statements.
     */
    public static String[] parseSqlFile(Reader sqlFile) throws IOException {
        return parseSqlFile(new BufferedReader(sqlFile));
    }

    /**
     * Parses a file containing sql statements into a String array that contains
     * only the sql statements. Comments and white spaces in the file are not
     * parsed into the String array. Note the file must not contained malformed
     * comments and all sql statements must end with a semi-colon ";" in order
     * for the file to be parsed correctly. The sql statements in the String
     * array will not end with a semi-colon ";".
     * 
     * @param sqlFile
     *            - BufferedReader for the file that contains sql statements.
     * 
     * @return String array containing the sql statements.
     */
    public static String[] parseSqlFile(BufferedReader sqlFile) throws IOException {
        String line;
        StringBuilder sql = new StringBuilder();
        String multiLineComment = null;

        while ((line = sqlFile.readLine()) != null) {
            line = line.trim();

            // Check for start of multi-line comment
            if (multiLineComment == null) {
                // Check for first multi-line comment type
                if (line.startsWith("/*")) {
                    if (!line.endsWith("}")) {
                        multiLineComment = "/*";
                    }
                // Check for second multi-line comment type
                } else if (line.startsWith("{")) {
                    if (!line.endsWith("}")) {
                        multiLineComment = "{";
                }
                // Append line if line is not empty or a single line comment
                } else if (!line.startsWith("--") && !line.equals("")) {
                    sql.append(line);
                } // Check for matching end comment
            } else if (multiLineComment.equals("/*")) {
                if (line.endsWith("*/")) {
                    multiLineComment = null;
                }
            // Check for matching end comment
            } else if (multiLineComment.equals("{")) {
                if (line.endsWith("}")) {
                    multiLineComment = null;
                }
            }

        }

        sqlFile.close();

        return sql.toString().split(";");
    }

}
  • i used the above code to to upgrade my db "upgrade_database.sql contains insert statement. some of the values have semicoln like insert into table_a values ('ss','ddd','aaaa;aaa'); " when i run the i noticed above mention insert not getting esecute because of the semicoln in the values any ides how to fix this. – Sam Jul 16 '11 at 10:48
  • 5
    There is a third option - copy the db from the web. I've done this and it goes fairly quickly for a 4 meg db. It also solves the issue with 2.3, for which the first solution (copy db) doesn't work. – Jack BeNimble Sep 9 '11 at 13:00
  • 2
    Danny And Austyn - Your solution was perfect. I was having trouble with my home brewed solution and stumbled on yours. It really hit the spot. Thanks for taking the time to provide it. – George Baker Feb 27 '12 at 3:44
  • 4
    I much prefer this answer against the top voted and accepted one. It has all information in one place (no see this link parts) and mentioned some Android specifics that I had no idea existed(like CREATE TABLE "android_metadata"). Also examples are written in great detail which is a plus. It's almost a copy paste solution which is not always good but explanations between the code are great. – PSIXO Mar 10 '14 at 12:31
  • I am using same method but I am facing one problem.How we can copy all the existing data from old to new db file in more easy way. – Pankaj Mar 25 '15 at 4:15

The SQLiteAssetHelper library makes this task really simple.

It's easy to add as a gradle dependency (but a Jar is also available for Ant/Eclipse), and together with the documentation it can be found at:
https://github.com/jgilfelt/android-sqlite-asset-helper

Note: This project is no longer maintained as stated on above Github link.

As explained in documentation:

  1. Add the dependency to your module's gradle build file:

    dependencies {
        compile 'com.readystatesoftware.sqliteasset:sqliteassethelper:+'
    }
    
  2. Copy the database into the assets directory, in a subdirectory called assets/databases. For instance:
    assets/databases/my_database.db

    (Optionally, you may compress the database in a zip file such as assets/databases/my_database.zip. This isn't needed, since the APK is compressed as a whole already.)

  3. Create a class, for example:

    public class MyDatabase extends SQLiteAssetHelper {
    
        private static final String DATABASE_NAME = "my_database.db";
        private static final int DATABASE_VERSION = 1;
    
        public MyDatabase(Context context) {
            super(context, DATABASE_NAME, null, DATABASE_VERSION);
        }
    }
    
  • android-sqlite-asset-helper.jar downloading require which credential ? – Pr38y Dec 3 '14 at 13:21
  • 1
    If you are using gradle then you just add the dependency. – Suragch Apr 9 '15 at 3:30
  • How do you get data from the DB? – Machado Sep 15 '15 at 20:17
  • It is even more easier with Android Studio and gradle. Check the link! – bendaf Oct 6 '15 at 14:31
  • 4
    Note that this library is abandoned, with last update 4 years ago. – Mateusz Konieczny Feb 13 at 17:35

I guess the best and the newest way till today is using SQLiteAssetHelper class.

This tutorial guides you perfectly through Importing and Using External Database in Android

The Android SQLiteAssetHelper library allows you to build your SQLite database in your desktop computer, and to import and use it in your Android application. Let's create a simple application to demonstrate the application of this library.

Step 1: Create a database quotes.db using your favorite SQLite database application (DB Browser for SQLite is a portable cross platform freeware, which can be used to create and edit SQLite databases). Create a table 'quotes' with a single column 'quote'. Insert some random quotes into the table 'quotes'.

Step 2: The database can be imported into project either directly as it is, or as a compressed file. The compressed file is recommended, if your database is too large in size. You can create either a ZIP compression or a GZ compression.

The file name of the compressed db file must be quotes.db.zip, if you are using ZIP compression or quotes.db.gz, if you are using GZ compression.

Step 3: Create a new application External Database Demo with a package name com.javahelps.com.javahelps.externaldatabasedemo.

Step 4: Open the build.gradle (Module: app) file and add the following dependency.

dependencies {
    compile 'com.readystatesoftware.sqliteasset:sqliteassethelper:+'
}

Once you have saved the build.gradle file click on the 'Sync Now' link to update the project. You can synchronize the build.gradle, by right clicking on the build.gradle file and selecting Synchronize build.gradle option as well.

Step 5: Right click on the app folder and create new assets folder.

Step 6: Create a new folder 'databases' inside the assets folder.

Step 7: Copy and paste the quotes.db.zip file inside the assets/databases folder.

Step 8: Create a new class DatabaseOpenHelper

package com.javahelps.externaldatabasedemo;

import android.content.Context;

import com.readystatesoftware.sqliteasset.SQLiteAssetHelper;

public class DatabaseOpenHelper extends SQLiteAssetHelper {
    private static final String DATABASE_NAME = "quotes.db";
    private static final int DATABASE_VERSION = 1;

    public DatabaseOpenHelper(Context context) {
        super(context, DATABASE_NAME, null, DATABASE_VERSION);
    }
}  Notice that rather than extending SQLiteOpenHelper, the DatabaseOpenHelper extends  SQLiteAssetHelper class.

Step 9: Create a new class DatabaseAccess and enter the code as shown below. More details about this class is available at Advanced Android Database tutorial.

package com.javahelps.externaldatabasedemo;

import android.content.Context;
import android.database.Cursor;
import android.database.sqlite.SQLiteDatabase;
import android.database.sqlite.SQLiteOpenHelper;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class DatabaseAccess {
    private SQLiteOpenHelper openHelper;
    private SQLiteDatabase database;
    private static DatabaseAccess instance;

    /**
     * Private constructor to aboid object creation from outside classes.
     *
     * @param context
     */
    private DatabaseAccess(Context context) {
        this.openHelper = new DatabaseOpenHelper(context);
    }

    /**
     * Return a singleton instance of DatabaseAccess.
     *
     * @param context the Context
     * @return the instance of DabaseAccess
     */
    public static DatabaseAccess getInstance(Context context) {
        if (instance == null) {
            instance = new DatabaseAccess(context);
        }
        return instance;
    }

    /**
     * Open the database connection.
     */
    public void open() {
        this.database = openHelper.getWritableDatabase();
    }

    /**
     * Close the database connection.
     */
    public void close() {
        if (database != null) {
            this.database.close();
        }
    }

    /**
     * Read all quotes from the database.
     *
     * @return a List of quotes
     */
    public List<String> getQuotes() {
        List<String> list = new ArrayList<>();
        Cursor cursor = database.rawQuery("SELECT * FROM quotes", null);
        cursor.moveToFirst();
        while (!cursor.isAfterLast()) {
            list.add(cursor.getString(0));
            cursor.moveToNext();
        }
        cursor.close();
        return list;
    }
}  In this class only the `getQuotes` method is implemented to read the data from the database. You have the full freedom to insert,

update and delete any rows in the database as usual. For more details, follow this link Advanced Android Database.

All the database related setups are completed and now we need to create a ListView to display the quotes.

Step 10: Add a ListView in your activity_main.xml.

<FrameLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:paddingBottom="@dimen/activity_vertical_margin"
    android:paddingLeft="@dimen/activity_horizontal_margin"
    android:paddingRight="@dimen/activity_horizontal_margin"
    android:paddingTop="@dimen/activity_vertical_margin"
    tools:context=".MainActivity">

    <ListView
        android:id="@+id/listView"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="match_parent"
        android:layout_gravity="center" />
</FrameLayout>  

Step 11: Find the object of ListView in the onCreate method of MainActivity and feed the quotes which are read form the database.

package com.javahelps.externaldatabasedemo;

import android.os.Bundle;
import android.support.v7.app.ActionBarActivity;
import android.widget.ArrayAdapter;
import android.widget.ListView;

import java.util.List;


public class MainActivity extends ActionBarActivity {
    private ListView listView;

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);

        this.listView = (ListView) findViewById(R.id.listView);
        DatabaseAccess databaseAccess = DatabaseAccess.getInstance(this);
        databaseAccess.open();
        List<String> quotes = databaseAccess.getQuotes();
        databaseAccess.close();

        ArrayAdapter<String> adapter = new ArrayAdapter<String>(this, android.R.layout.simple_list_item_1,
quotes);
        this.listView.setAdapter(adapter);
    }
}

Step 12: Save all the changes and run the application.

In addition to this article you can download SQLiteAssetHelper here

  • 1
    I can totally skip step 9 right? Is there any backdraw if I just create the getInstance() method in the AssetHelper object?, and a little bit off-topic, what is the advantage singleton pattern offers in the DatabaseAccess class? – LuisE Oct 29 '16 at 16:10
  • Note that it is using github.com/jgilfelt/android-sqlite-asset-helper library with last update in 2014. – Mateusz Konieczny Feb 13 at 17:38

My solution neither uses any third-party library nor forces you to call custom methods on SQLiteOpenHelper subclass to initialize the database on creation. It also takes care of database upgrades as well. All that needs to be done is to subclass SQLiteOpenHelper.

Prerequisite:

  1. The database that you wish to ship with the app. It should contain a 1x1 table named android_metadata with an attribute locale having the value en_US in addition to the tables unique to your app.

Subclassing SQLiteOpenHelper:

  1. Subclass SQLiteOpenHelper.
  2. Create a private method within the SQLiteOpenHelper subclass. This method contains the logic to copy database contents from the database file in the 'assets' folder to the database created in the application package context.
  3. Override onCreate, onUpgrade and onOpen methods of SQLiteOpenHelper.

Enough said. Here goes the SQLiteOpenHelper subclass:

public class PlanDetailsSQLiteOpenHelper extends SQLiteOpenHelper {
    private static final String TAG = "SQLiteOpenHelper";

    private final Context context;
    private static final int DATABASE_VERSION = 1;
    private static final String DATABASE_NAME = "my_custom_db";

    private boolean createDb = false, upgradeDb = false;

    public PlanDetailsSQLiteOpenHelper(Context context) {
        super(context, DATABASE_NAME, null, DATABASE_VERSION);
        this.context = context;
    }

    /**
     * Copy packaged database from assets folder to the database created in the
     * application package context.
     * 
     * @param db
     *            The target database in the application package context.
     */
    private void copyDatabaseFromAssets(SQLiteDatabase db) {
        Log.i(TAG, "copyDatabase");
        InputStream myInput = null;
        OutputStream myOutput = null;
        try {
            // Open db packaged as asset as the input stream
            myInput = context.getAssets().open("path/to/shipped/db/file");

            // Open the db in the application package context:
            myOutput = new FileOutputStream(db.getPath());

            // Transfer db file contents:
            byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
            int length;
            while ((length = myInput.read(buffer)) > 0) {
                myOutput.write(buffer, 0, length);
            }
            myOutput.flush();

            // Set the version of the copied database to the current
            // version:
            SQLiteDatabase copiedDb = context.openOrCreateDatabase(
                DATABASE_NAME, 0, null);
            copiedDb.execSQL("PRAGMA user_version = " + DATABASE_VERSION);
            copiedDb.close();

        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            throw new Error(TAG + " Error copying database");
        } finally {
            // Close the streams
            try {
                if (myOutput != null) {
                    myOutput.close();
                }
                if (myInput != null) {
                    myInput.close();
                }
            } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
                throw new Error(TAG + " Error closing streams");
            }
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void onCreate(SQLiteDatabase db) {
        Log.i(TAG, "onCreate db");
        createDb = true;
    }

    @Override
    public void onUpgrade(SQLiteDatabase db, int oldVersion, int newVersion) {
        Log.i(TAG, "onUpgrade db");
        upgradeDb = true;
    }

    @Override
    public void onOpen(SQLiteDatabase db) {
        Log.i(TAG, "onOpen db");
        if (createDb) {// The db in the application package
            // context is being created.
            // So copy the contents from the db
            // file packaged in the assets
            // folder:
            createDb = false;
            copyDatabaseFromAssets(db);

        }
        if (upgradeDb) {// The db in the application package
            // context is being upgraded from a lower to a higher version.
            upgradeDb = false;
            // Your db upgrade logic here:
        }
    }
}

Finally, to get a database connection, just call getReadableDatabase() or getWritableDatabase() on the SQLiteOpenHelper subclass and it will take care of creating a db, copying db contents from the specified file in the 'assets' folder, if the database does not exist.

In short, you can use the SQLiteOpenHelper subclass to access the db shipped in the assets folder just as you would use for a database that is initialized using SQL queries in the onCreate() method.

  • 1
    This is the most elegant solution, using standard Androids APIs without the need of external libraries. As a note, I didn't included the android_metadata table and it works, newer Android versions might add it automatically. – goetzc Sep 24 '16 at 21:31

Shipping the app with a database file, in Android Studio 3.0

Shipping the app with a database file is a good idea for me. The advantage is that you don't need to do a complex initialization, which sometimes costs lots of time, if your data set is huge.

Step 1: Prepare database file

Have your database file ready. It can be either a .db file or a .sqlite file. If you use a .sqlite file, all you need to do is to change file extension names. The steps are the same.

In this example, I prepared a file called testDB.db. It has one table and some sample data in it like this enter image description here

Step 2: Import the file into your project

Create the assets folder if you haven't had one. Then copy and paste the database file into this folder

enter image description here

Step 3: Copy the file to the app's data folder

You need to copy the database file to the app's data folder in order to do further interaction with it. This is a one time action (initialization) to copy the database file. If you call this code multiple times, the database file in data folder will be overwritten by the one in assets folder. This overwrite process is useful when you want to update the database in future during the app update.

Note that during app update, this database file will not be changed in the app's data folder. Only uninstall will delete it.

The database file needs to be copied to /databases folder. Open Device File Explorer. Enter data/data/<YourAppName>/ location. This is the app's default data folder mentioned above. And by default, the database file will be place in another folder called databases under this directory

enter image description here

Now, the copy file process is pretty much like the what Java is doing. Use the following code to do the copy paste. This is the initiation code. It can also be used to update(by overwriting) the database file in future.

//get context by calling "this" in activity or getActivity() in fragment
//call this if API level is lower than 17  String appDataPath = "/data/data/" + context.getPackageName() + "/databases/"
String appDataPath = context.getApplicationInfo().dataDir;

File dbFolder = new File(appDataPath + "/databases");//Make sure the /databases folder exists
dbFolder.mkdir();//This can be called multiple times.

File dbFilePath = new File(appDataPath + "/databases/testDB.db");

try {
    InputStream inputStream = context.getAssets().open("testDB.db");
    OutputStream outputStream = new FileOutputStream(dbFilePath);
    byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
    int length;
    while ((length = inputStream.read(buffer))>0)
    {
        outputStream.write(buffer, 0, length);
    }
    outputStream.flush();
    outputStream.close();
    inputStream.close();
} catch (IOException e){
    //handle
}

Then refresh the folder to verify the copy process

enter image description here

Step 4: Create database open helper

Create a subclass for SQLiteOpenHelper, with connect, close, path, etc. I named it DatabaseOpenHelper

import android.content.Context;
import android.database.SQLException;
import android.database.sqlite.SQLiteDatabase;
import android.database.sqlite.SQLiteOpenHelper;

public class DatabaseOpenHelper extends SQLiteOpenHelper {
    public static final String DB_NAME = "testDB.db";
    public static final String DB_SUB_PATH = "/databases/" + DB_NAME;
    private static String APP_DATA_PATH = "";
    private SQLiteDatabase dataBase;
    private final Context context;

    public DatabaseOpenHelper(Context context){
        super(context, DB_NAME, null, 1);
        APP_DATA_PATH = context.getApplicationInfo().dataDir;
        this.context = context;
    }

    public boolean openDataBase() throws SQLException{
        String mPath = APP_DATA_PATH + DB_SUB_PATH;
        //Note that this method assumes that the db file is already copied in place
        dataBase = SQLiteDatabase.openDatabase(mPath, null, SQLiteDatabase.OPEN_READWRITE);
        return dataBase != null;
    }

    @Override
    public synchronized void close(){
        if(dataBase != null) {dataBase.close();}
        super.close();
    }

    @Override
    public void onCreate(SQLiteDatabase db) {
    }

    @Override
    public void onUpgrade(SQLiteDatabase db, int oldVersion, int newVersion) {
    }
}

Step 5: Create top level class to interact with the database

This will be the class that read & write your database file. Also there is a sample query to print out the value in the database.

import android.content.Context;
import android.database.Cursor;
import android.database.SQLException;
import android.database.sqlite.SQLiteDatabase;
import android.util.Log;

public class Database {
    private final Context context;
    private SQLiteDatabase database;
    private DatabaseOpenHelper dbHelper;

    public Database(Context context){
        this.context = context;
        dbHelper = new DatabaseOpenHelper(context);
    }

    public Database open() throws SQLException
    {
        dbHelper.openDataBase();
        dbHelper.close();
        database = dbHelper.getReadableDatabase();
        return this;
    }

    public void close()
    {
        dbHelper.close();
    }

    public void test(){
        try{
            String query ="SELECT value FROM test1";
            Cursor cursor = database.rawQuery(query, null);
            if (cursor.moveToFirst()){
                do{
                    String value = cursor.getString(0);
                    Log.d("db", value);
                }while (cursor.moveToNext());
            }
            cursor.close();
        } catch (SQLException e) {
            //handle
        }
    }
}

Step 6: Test running

Test the code by running the following lines of codes.

Database db = new Database(context);
db.open();
db.test();
db.close();

Hit the run button and cheer!

enter image description here

  • when should the initialization be done? What is the strategy you suggest? – Daniele B Aug 14 at 10:59

In November 2017 Google released the Room Persistence Library

From the documentation:

The Room persistence library provides an abstraction layer over SQLite to allow fluent database access while harnessing the full power of SQLite.

The library helps you create a cache of your app's data on a device that's running your app. This cache, which serves as your app's single source of truth, allows users to view a consistent copy of key information within your app, regardless of whether users have an internet connection.

The Room database has a callback when the database is first created or opened. You can use the create callback to populate your database.

Room.databaseBuilder(context.applicationContext,
        DataDatabase::class.java, "Sample.db")
        // prepopulate the database after onCreate was called
        .addCallback(object : Callback() {
            override fun onCreate(db: SupportSQLiteDatabase) {
                super.onCreate(db)
                // moving to a new thread
                ioThread {
                    getInstance(context).dataDao()
                                        .insert(PREPOPULATE_DATA)
                }
            }
        })
        .build()

Code from this blog post.

  • Thanks, This worked for me. Java example here – Jerry Sha May 16 at 17:49
  • 1
    If you would like to ship an APK with an already existing SQLite, you can add it to the assets folder and use this package github.com/humazed/RoomAsset to perform a migration that will load the SQLite file data into the new one. This way, you can save the populating of data with an existing DB. – Carlos Alberto Martínez Gadea Aug 17 at 11:01

From what I've seen you should be be shipping a database that already has the tables setup and data. However if you want (and depending on the type of application you have) you can allow "upgrade database option". Then what you do is download the latest sqlite version, get the latest Insert/Create statements of a textfile hosted online, execute the statements and do a data transfer from the old db to the new one.

  • 6
    > From what I've seen you should be be shipping a database that already has the tables setup and data. Yes but how do you do this? – Rory Nov 16 '10 at 19:52

Finally I did it!! I have used this link help Using your own SQLite database in Android applications, but had to change it a little bit.

  1. If you have many packages you should put the master package name here:

    private static String DB_PATH = "data/data/masterPakageName/databases";

  2. I changed the method which copies the database from local folder to emulator folder! It had some problem when that folder didn't exist. So first of all, it should check the path and if it's not there, it should create the folder.

  3. In the previous code, the copyDatabase method was never called when the database didn't exist and the checkDataBase method caused exception. so I changed the code a little bit.

  4. If your database does not have a file extension, don't use the file name with one.

it works nice for me , i hope it whould be usefull for u too

    package farhangsarasIntroduction;


import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.io.OutputStream;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.HashMap;

import android.content.Context;
import android.database.Cursor;

import android.database.sqlite.SQLiteDatabase;
import android.database.sqlite.SQLiteException;
import android.database.sqlite.SQLiteOpenHelper;

import android.util.Log;


    public class DataBaseHelper extends SQLiteOpenHelper{

    //The Android's default system path of your application database.
    private static String DB_PATH = "data/data/com.example.sample/databases";

    private static String DB_NAME = "farhangsaraDb";

    private SQLiteDatabase myDataBase;

    private final Context myContext;

    /**
      * Constructor
      * Takes and keeps a reference of the passed context in order to access to the application assets and resources.
      * @param context
      */
    public DataBaseHelper(Context context) {

        super(context, DB_NAME, null, 1);
            this.myContext = context;

    }   

    /**
      * Creates a empty database on the system and rewrites it with your own database.
      * */
    public void createDataBase() {

        boolean dbExist;
        try {

             dbExist = checkDataBase();


        } catch (SQLiteException e) {

            e.printStackTrace();
            throw new Error("database dose not exist");

        }

        if(dbExist){
        //do nothing - database already exist
        }else{

            try {

                copyDataBase();


            } catch (IOException e) {

                e.printStackTrace();
                throw new Error("Error copying database");

            }
    //By calling this method and empty database will be created into the default system path
    //of your application so we are gonna be able to overwrite that database with our database.
        this.getReadableDatabase();


    }

    }

    /**
      * Check if the database already exist to avoid re-copying the file each time you open the application.
      * @return true if it exists, false if it doesn't
      */
    private boolean checkDataBase(){

    SQLiteDatabase checkDB = null;

    try{
        String myPath = DB_PATH +"/"+ DB_NAME;

        checkDB = SQLiteDatabase.openDatabase(myPath, null, SQLiteDatabase.OPEN_READONLY);
    }catch(SQLiteException e){

    //database does't exist yet.
        throw new Error("database does't exist yet.");

    }

    if(checkDB != null){

    checkDB.close();

    }

    return checkDB != null ? true : false;
    }

    /**
      * Copies your database from your local assets-folder to the just created empty database in the
      * system folder, from where it can be accessed and handled.
      * This is done by transfering bytestream.
      * */
    private void copyDataBase() throws IOException{



            //copyDataBase();
            //Open your local db as the input stream
            InputStream myInput = myContext.getAssets().open(DB_NAME);

            // Path to the just created empty db
            String outFileName = DB_PATH +"/"+ DB_NAME;
            File databaseFile = new File( DB_PATH);
             // check if databases folder exists, if not create one and its subfolders
            if (!databaseFile.exists()){
                databaseFile.mkdir();
            }

            //Open the empty db as the output stream
            OutputStream myOutput = new FileOutputStream(outFileName);

            //transfer bytes from the inputfile to the outputfile
            byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
            int length;
            while ((length = myInput.read(buffer))>0){
            myOutput.write(buffer, 0, length);
            }

            //Close the streams
            myOutput.flush();
            myOutput.close();
            myInput.close();



    }



    @Override
    public synchronized void close() {

        if(myDataBase != null)
        myDataBase.close();

        super.close();

    }

    @Override
    public void onCreate(SQLiteDatabase db) {

    }



    @Override
    public void onUpgrade(SQLiteDatabase db, int oldVersion, int newVersion) {

    }

     you to create adapters for your views.

}
  • can u please let me know how to upgrade db if i want to replace old database with new one how can i delete old db – Erum Mar 4 '14 at 17:09
  • I haven`t need to do this untill now ,but if new app has been installed , the new db replace too – afsane Mar 10 '14 at 6:35
  • how to delete old database because i am adding new db in assets folder then how will i delete old db from the specified folder otherwise it will bring the contents of old db – Erum Mar 10 '14 at 10:31
  • I hope this would be usefull stackoverflow.com/questions/9109438/… – afsane Mar 11 '14 at 10:50
  • Perfect, thank you! Just one comment, throwing the exception on checking the database causes the app to close, since the DB won't be there in the beginning and the method does not continue after the exception is thrown. I simply commented out the throw new Error("database dose not exist"); and now everything works perfectly. – Grinner Sep 9 '14 at 13:37

Currently there is no way to precreate an SQLite database to ship with your apk. The best you can do is save the appropriate SQL as a resource and run them from your application. Yes, this leads to duplication of data (same information exists as a resrouce and as a database) but there is no other way right now. The only mitigating factor is the apk file is compressed. My experience is 908KB compresses to less than 268KB.

The thread below has the best discussion/solution I have found with good sample code.

http://groups.google.com/group/android-developers/msg/9f455ae93a1cf152

I stored my CREATE statement as a string resource to be read with Context.getString() and ran it with SQLiteDatabse.execSQL().

I stored the data for my inserts in res/raw/inserts.sql (I created the sql file, 7000+ lines). Using the technique from the link above I entered a loop, read the file line by line and concactenated the data onto "INSERT INTO tbl VALUE " and did another SQLiteDatabase.execSQL(). No sense in saving 7000 "INSERT INTO tbl VALUE "s when they can just be concactenated on.

It takes about twenty seconds on the emulator, I do not know how long this would take on a real phone, but it only happens once, when the user first starts the application.

  • 3
    How about pulling the SQL script from the web on the first run? This way there is no need to duplicate data. – Tamas Czinege Mar 6 '09 at 19:35
  • 1
    Yes, but the device will need to be connected to the internet. That's a serious drawback in some apps. – hasMobi - Android Apps Feb 12 '14 at 17:00

Shipping the database inside the apk and then copying it to /data/data/... will double the size of the database (1 in apk, 1 in data/data/...), and will increase the apk size (of course). So your database should not be too big.

  • 2
    It does increase the apk size somewhat but it doesn't double it. When it is in assets it is compressed and so is a lot smaller. After copying it to the database folder it gets uncompressed. – Suragch Apr 9 '15 at 2:32

Android already provides a version-aware approach of database management. This approach has been leveraged in the BARACUS framework for Android applications.

It enables you to manage the database along the entire version lifecycle of an app, beeing able to update the sqlite database from any prior version to the current one.

Also, it allows you to run hot-backups and hot-recovery of the SQLite.

I am not 100% sure, but a hot-recovery for a specific device may enable you to ship a prepared database in your app. But I am not sure about the database binary format which might be specific to certain devices, vendors or device generations.

Since the stuff is Apache License 2, feel free to reuse any part of the code, which can be found on github

EDIT :

If you only want to ship data, you might consider instantiating and persisting POJOs at the applications first start. BARACUS got a built-in support to this (Built-in key value store for configuration infos, e.g. "APP_FIRST_RUN" plus a after-context-bootstrap hook in order to run post-launch operations on the context). This enables you to have tight coupled data shipped with your app; in most cases this fitted to my use cases.

If the required data is not too large (limits I don´t know, would depend on a lot of things), you might also download the data (in XML, JSON, whatever) from a website/webapp. AFter receiving, execute the SQL statements using the received data creating your tables and inserting the data.

If your mobile app contains lots of data, it might be easier later on to update the data in the installed apps with more accurate data or changes.

I wrote a library to simplify this process.

dataBase = new DataBase.Builder(context, "myDb").
//        setAssetsPath(). // default "databases"
//        setDatabaseErrorHandler().
//        setCursorFactory().
//        setUpgradeCallback()
//        setVersion(). // default 1
build();

It will create a dataBase from assets/databases/myDb.db file. In addition you will get all those functionality:

  • Load database from file
  • Synchronized access to the database
  • Using sqlite-android by requery, Android specific distribution of the latest versions of SQLite.

Clone it from github.

I'm using ORMLite and below code worked for me

public class DatabaseProvider extends OrmLiteSqliteOpenHelper {
    private static final String DatabaseName = "DatabaseName";
    private static final int DatabaseVersion = 1;
    private final Context ProvidedContext;

    public DatabaseProvider(Context context) {
        super(context, DatabaseName, null, DatabaseVersion);
        this.ProvidedContext= context;
        SharedPreferences preferences = PreferenceManager.getDefaultSharedPreferences(context);
        boolean databaseCopied = preferences.getBoolean("DatabaseCopied", false);
        if (databaseCopied) {
            //Do Nothing
        } else {
            CopyDatabase();
            SharedPreferences.Editor editor = preferences.edit();
            editor.putBoolean("DatabaseCopied", true);
            editor.commit();
        }
    }

    private String DatabasePath() {
        return "/data/data/" + ProvidedContext.getPackageName() + "/databases/";
    }

    private void CopyDatabase() {
        try {
            CopyDatabaseInternal();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    private File ExtractAssetsZip(String zipFileName) {
        InputStream inputStream;
        ZipInputStream zipInputStream;
        File tempFolder;
        do {
            tempFolder = null;
            tempFolder = new File(ProvidedContext.getCacheDir() + "/extracted-" + System.currentTimeMillis() + "/");
        } while (tempFolder.exists());

        tempFolder.mkdirs();

        try {
            String filename;
            inputStream = ProvidedContext.getAssets().open(zipFileName);
            zipInputStream = new ZipInputStream(new BufferedInputStream(inputStream));
            ZipEntry zipEntry;
            byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
            int count;

            while ((zipEntry = zipInputStream.getNextEntry()) != null) {
                filename = zipEntry.getName();
                if (zipEntry.isDirectory()) {
                    File fmd = new File(tempFolder.getAbsolutePath() + "/" + filename);
                    fmd.mkdirs();
                    continue;
                }

                FileOutputStream fileOutputStream = new FileOutputStream(tempFolder.getAbsolutePath() + "/" + filename);
                while ((count = zipInputStream.read(buffer)) != -1) {
                    fileOutputStream.write(buffer, 0, count);
                }

                fileOutputStream.close();
                zipInputStream.closeEntry();
            }

            zipInputStream.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            return null;
        }

        return tempFolder;
    }

    private void CopyDatabaseInternal() throws IOException {

        File extractedPath = ExtractAssetsZip(DatabaseName + ".zip");
        String databaseFile = "";
        for (File innerFile : extractedPath.listFiles()) {
            databaseFile = innerFile.getAbsolutePath();
            break;
        }
        if (databaseFile == null || databaseFile.length() ==0 )
            throw new RuntimeException("databaseFile is empty");

        InputStream inputStream = new FileInputStream(databaseFile);

        String outFileName = DatabasePath() + DatabaseName;

        File destinationPath = new File(DatabasePath());
        if (!destinationPath.exists())
            destinationPath.mkdirs();

        File destinationFile = new File(outFileName);
        if (!destinationFile.exists())
            destinationFile.createNewFile();

        OutputStream myOutput = new FileOutputStream(outFileName);

        byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
        int length;
        while ((length = inputStream.read(buffer)) > 0) {
            myOutput.write(buffer, 0, length);
        }

        myOutput.flush();
        myOutput.close();
        inputStream.close();
    }

    @Override
    public void onCreate(SQLiteDatabase sqLiteDatabase, ConnectionSource connectionSource) {
    }

    @Override
    public void onUpgrade(SQLiteDatabase sqLiteDatabase, ConnectionSource connectionSource, int fromVersion, int toVersion) {

    }
}

Please note, The code extracts database file from a zip file in assets

I modified the class and the answers to the question and wrote a class that allows updating the database via DB_VERSION.

public class DatabaseHelper extends SQLiteOpenHelper {
    private static String DB_NAME = "info.db";
    private static String DB_PATH = "";
    private static final int DB_VERSION = 1;

    private SQLiteDatabase mDataBase;
    private final Context mContext;
    private boolean mNeedUpdate = false;

    public DatabaseHelper(Context context) {
        super(context, DB_NAME, null, DB_VERSION);
        if (android.os.Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= 17)
            DB_PATH = context.getApplicationInfo().dataDir + "/databases/";
        else
            DB_PATH = "/data/data/" + context.getPackageName() + "/databases/";
        this.mContext = context;

        copyDataBase();

        this.getReadableDatabase();
    }

    public void updateDataBase() throws IOException {
        if (mNeedUpdate) {
            File dbFile = new File(DB_PATH + DB_NAME);
            if (dbFile.exists())
                dbFile.delete();

            copyDataBase();

            mNeedUpdate = false;
        }
    }

    private boolean checkDataBase() {
        File dbFile = new File(DB_PATH + DB_NAME);
        return dbFile.exists();
    }

    private void copyDataBase() {
        if (!checkDataBase()) {
            this.getReadableDatabase();
            this.close();
            try {
                copyDBFile();
            } catch (IOException mIOException) {
                throw new Error("ErrorCopyingDataBase");
            }
        }
    }

    private void copyDBFile() throws IOException {
        InputStream mInput = mContext.getAssets().open(DB_NAME);
        //InputStream mInput = mContext.getResources().openRawResource(R.raw.info);
        OutputStream mOutput = new FileOutputStream(DB_PATH + DB_NAME);
        byte[] mBuffer = new byte[1024];
        int mLength;
        while ((mLength = mInput.read(mBuffer)) > 0)
            mOutput.write(mBuffer, 0, mLength);
        mOutput.flush();
        mOutput.close();
        mInput.close();
    }

    public boolean openDataBase() throws SQLException {
        mDataBase = SQLiteDatabase.openDatabase(DB_PATH + DB_NAME, null, SQLiteDatabase.CREATE_IF_NECESSARY);
        return mDataBase != null;
    }

    @Override
    public synchronized void close() {
        if (mDataBase != null)
            mDataBase.close();
        super.close();
    }

    @Override
    public void onCreate(SQLiteDatabase db) {

    }

    @Override
    public void onUpgrade(SQLiteDatabase db, int oldVersion, int newVersion) {
        if (newVersion > oldVersion)
            mNeedUpdate = true;
    }
}

Using a class.

In the activity class, declare variables.

private DatabaseHelper mDBHelper;
private SQLiteDatabase mDb;

In the onCreate method, write the following code.

mDBHelper = new DatabaseHelper(this);

try {
    mDBHelper.updateDataBase();
} catch (IOException mIOException) {
    throw new Error("UnableToUpdateDatabase");
}

try {
    mDb = mDBHelper.getWritableDatabase();
} catch (SQLException mSQLException) {
    throw mSQLException;
}

If you add a database file to the folder res/raw then use the following modification of the class.

public class DatabaseHelper extends SQLiteOpenHelper {
    private static String DB_NAME = "info.db";
    private static String DB_PATH = "";
    private static final int DB_VERSION = 1;

    private SQLiteDatabase mDataBase;
    private final Context mContext;
    private boolean mNeedUpdate = false;

    public DatabaseHelper(Context context) {
        super(context, DB_NAME, null, DB_VERSION);
        if (android.os.Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= 17)
            DB_PATH = context.getApplicationInfo().dataDir + "/databases/";
        else
            DB_PATH = "/data/data/" + context.getPackageName() + "/databases/";
        this.mContext = context;

        copyDataBase();

        this.getReadableDatabase();
    }

    public void updateDataBase() throws IOException {
        if (mNeedUpdate) {
            File dbFile = new File(DB_PATH + DB_NAME);
            if (dbFile.exists())
                dbFile.delete();

            copyDataBase();

            mNeedUpdate = false;
        }
    }

    private boolean checkDataBase() {
        File dbFile = new File(DB_PATH + DB_NAME);
        return dbFile.exists();
    }

    private void copyDataBase() {
        if (!checkDataBase()) {
            this.getReadableDatabase();
            this.close();
            try {
                copyDBFile();
            } catch (IOException mIOException) {
                throw new Error("ErrorCopyingDataBase");
            }
        }
    }

    private void copyDBFile() throws IOException {
        //InputStream mInput = mContext.getAssets().open(DB_NAME);
        InputStream mInput = mContext.getResources().openRawResource(R.raw.info);
        OutputStream mOutput = new FileOutputStream(DB_PATH + DB_NAME);
        byte[] mBuffer = new byte[1024];
        int mLength;
        while ((mLength = mInput.read(mBuffer)) > 0)
            mOutput.write(mBuffer, 0, mLength);
        mOutput.flush();
        mOutput.close();
        mInput.close();
    }

    public boolean openDataBase() throws SQLException {
        mDataBase = SQLiteDatabase.openDatabase(DB_PATH + DB_NAME, null, SQLiteDatabase.CREATE_IF_NECESSARY);
        return mDataBase != null;
    }

    @Override
    public synchronized void close() {
        if (mDataBase != null)
            mDataBase.close();
        super.close();
    }

    @Override
    public void onCreate(SQLiteDatabase db) {

    }

    @Override
    public void onUpgrade(SQLiteDatabase db, int oldVersion, int newVersion) {
        if (newVersion > oldVersion)
            mNeedUpdate = true;
    }
}

http://blog.harrix.org/article/6784

protected by Community Mar 24 '12 at 18:05

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