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I am trying to create the string:

185 bananas walk into a bar. The bartender says, "We don't serve bananas here." So the bananas split!

If I enter

q = "185 bananas walk into a bar. The bartender says, \"We don't serve bananas here.\" So the bananas split!"

I get

185 bananas walk into a bar. The bartender says, "We don\'t serve bananas here." So the bananas split!

I don't want the \ before the ' but I don't know how to get rid of it

  • In your code is it "... don\'t ..." or "...don't..."? – Ben Jones Jul 12 '18 at 16:47
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    Your string is fine. Your string doesn't have any backslashes in it. The repr representation has a backslash in it (as well as single-quotes on each end that you edited out), but the string doesn't have any backslashes. – user2357112 Jul 12 '18 at 16:47
  • if you print q, you won't have an issue. – W Stokvis Jul 12 '18 at 16:48
  • That escape isn't actually there, its just an escape. If you were to loop over the string with a loop and look at every char, you'd never see the escape – dheiberg Jul 12 '18 at 16:48
  • 1
    That should only happen in the REPL or using repr(...). If you print it out with print(q) you'll get what you want. – mypetlion Jul 12 '18 at 16:48
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Your code is fine. When you do

q = "185 bananas walk into a bar. The bartender says, \"We don't serve bananas here.\" So the bananas split!"

The backslashes are not inserted in the string, they are just a way to tell python that the following quote is a not closing the string, but meant to be included as part of the string. Python obeys that and adds the quote to the string but not the backslash.

When you show the string again, if you use the python prompt (REPL >>>) or ipython notebook, you get the representation of the object, which will include the surrouding quotes, and backslashes to show that the inner quotes are not closing the string. But if you print the string with print() or send it somewhere, the backslashes are not there. They are one visible by the programmer when displaying the representation, which should be used only for debugging anyway.

Another way to include quotes in a string is to use a triple quoted string, then you don't need the backslashes:

q = """185 bananas walk into a bar. The bartender says, "We don't serve bananas here." So the bananas split!"""
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which python version are you using? I tried the same thing on python 3 and it works. I don't think your string has any problem

q = "185 bananas walk into a bar. The bartender says, \"We don't serve bananas here.\" 
So the bananas split!"
print (q)

This gives the output -

185 bananas walk into a bar. The bartender says, "We don't serve bananas here." So 
the bananas split!
0

There are several ways to go about this:

  • the way you did it (if you print your variable with print(q) you'll see that it prints correctly; the interactive representation has an escape slash to make it easy for you to copy/paste it)
  • use triple quotes

The last option is probably best for you here, like this:

q = """185 bananas walk into a bar. The bartender says, "We don't serve bananas here." So the bananas split!"""
print(q)
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If your problem is about seeing or processing the backslashes in the string value, that’s not a problem; they aren’t there.

If it’s about typing or reading the backslashes in the literal in your source code, that is a problem—which Python solves with triple-quoting:

 """This "happy" string ain't got no problems."""

You can embed both kinds of quotes in a triple-quoted string.

(What if you’re quoting some Python code and it uses single and double quotes and even tripled single and double quotes? Well, then you’re going to need to either escape them, or use string literal concatenation to break the triple quotes across two separate literals, or something similar. But this is a much rarer problem.)

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