Something I still don't fully understand. For example, standard C functions such as printf() and scanf() which deal with sending data to the standard output or getting data from the standard input. Will the source code which implements these functions be different depending on if we are using them for Windows or Linux?

I'm guessing the quick answer would be "yes", but do they really have to be different?

I'm probably wrong , but my guess is that the actual function code be the same, but the lower layer functions of the OS that eventually get called by these functions are different. So could any compiler compile these same C functions, but it is what gets linked after (what these functions depend on to work on lower layers) is what gives us the required behavior?

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    Why should they be forced to be the same ? – Stargateur Jul 12 at 20:45
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    The library function is only required to perform to the standard, no matter how it is implemented. – Weather Vane Jul 12 at 20:46
  • There are many differences in the operating systems, and consequently many differences in the way the functions implementing the C standard are written. For the I/O functions such as printf(), you have issues related to code sets and locales to worry about, for example, and they're handled differently on Windows and Unix. – Jonathan Leffler Jul 12 at 20:48
  • There are typically no OS dependencies in printf, so it could be implemented portably -- if there were a portable FILE * and other stdio infrastructure for it to be implemented in terms of, which there isn't. (Although theoretically you could write a 100% portable printf in terms of putchar.) But there tend to be other platform dependencies that creep into printf, like the platform-appropriate way to print pointers with %p, and any platform extensions or restrictions. (Which there tend to be lots of. Microsoft has tinkered with printf a lot, and the FSF has, too.) – Steve Summit Jul 12 at 21:22

Will the source code which implements these functions be different depending on if we are using them for Windows or Linux?

Probably. It may even be different on different Linuxes, and for different Windows programs. There are several distinct implementations of the C standard library available for Linux, and maybe even more than one for Windows. Distinct implementations will have different implementation code, otherwise lawyers get involved.

my guess is that the actual function code be the same, but the lower layer functions of the OS that eventually get called by these functions are different. So could any compiler compile these same C functions, but it is what gets linked after (what these functions depend on to work on lower layers) is what gives us the required behavior?

It is conceivable that standard library functions would be written in a way that abstracts the environment dependencies to some lower layer, so that the same source for each of those functions themselves can be used in multiple environments, with some kind of environment-specific compatibility layer underneath. Inasmuch as the GNU C library supports a wide variety of environments, it serves as an example of the general principle, though Windows is not among the environments it supports. Even then, however, the environment distinction would be effective even before the link stage. Different environments have a variety of binary formats.

In practice, however, you are very unlikely to see the situation you describe for Windows and Linux.

Yes, they have different implementations.

Moreover you might be using multiple different implementations on the same OS. For example:

  • MinGW is shipped with its own implementation of standard library which is different from the one used by MSVC.
  • There are many different implementations of C library even for Linux: glibc, musl, dietlibc and others.

Obviously, this means there is some code duplication in the community, but there are many good reasons for that:

  • People have different views on how things should be implemented and tested. This alone is enough to "fork" the project.
  • License: implementations put some restrictions on how they can be used and might require some actions from the end user (GPL requires you to share your code in some cases). Not everyone can follow those requirements.
  • People have very different needs. Some environments are multithreaded, some are not. printf might need or might not need to use some thread synchronization mechanisms. Some people need locale support, some don't. All this can bloat the code in the end, not everyone is willing to pay for things they do not use. Even strerror is vastly different on different OSes.
  • Aforementioned synchronization mechanisms are usually OS-specific and work in specific ways. Same can be said about locale handling, signal handling and other things, including the actual data writing and reading.
  • Some implementations add non-standard extensions that can make your life easier. Not all of those make sense on other OSes. For example glibc adds 'e' mode specifier to open file with O_CLOEXEC flag. This doesn't make sense for Windows.
  • Many complex things cannot be implemented in pure C and require some compiler-specific extensions. This can tie implementation to a limited number of compilers.

In the end, it is much simpler to have many C libraries, than trying to create a one-size-fits-all implementation.

As you say the higher level parts of the implementation of something like printf, like the code used to format the string using the arguments, can be written in a cross-platform way and be shared between Linux and Windows. I'm not sure if there's a C library that actually does it though.

But to interact with the hardware or use other operating system facilities (such as when printf writes to the console), the libc implementation has to use the OS's interface: the system calls. And these are very different between Windows and Unix-likes, and different even among Unix-likes (POSIX specifies a lot of them but there are OS specific extensions). For example here you can find system call tables for Linux and Windows.

There are two parts to functions like printf(). The first part parses the format string, and assembles an array of characters ready for output. If this part is written in C, there's no reason preventing it being common across all C libraries, and no reason preventing it being different, so long the standard definition of what printf() does is implemented. As it happens, different library developers have read the standard's definition of printf(), and have come up with different ways of parsing and acting on the format string. Most of them have done so correctly.

The second part, the bit that outputs those characters to stdout, is where the differences come in. It depends on using the kernel system call interface; it's the kernel / OS that looks after input/output, and that is done in a specific way. The source code required to get the Linux kernel to output characters is very different to that required to get Windows to output characters.

On Linux, it's usual to use glibc; this does some elaborate things with printf(), buffering the output characters in a pipe until a newline is output, and only then calling the Linux system call for displaying characters on the screen. This means that printf() calls from separate threads are neatly separated, each being on their own line. But the same program source code, compiled against another C library for Linux, won't necessarily do the same thing, resulting in printf() output from different threads being all jumbled up and unreadable.

There's also no reason why the library that contains printf() should be written in C. So long as the same function calling convention as used by the C compiler is honoured, you could write it in assembler (though that'd be slightly mad!). Or Ada (calling convention might be a bit tricky...).

Will the source code which implements these functions be different

Let us try another point-of-view: competition.

No. Competitors in industry are not required by the C spec to share source code to issue a compliant compiler - nor would various standard C library developers always want to.

C does not require "open source".

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