I am trying to figure out the settings in mySQL on indexes. When does mySQL ignore an index?

Here are the results of an experiment. I have a table with an index on the AGE column as follows.

CREATE TABLE `USERS` (
  `ID` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `FIRSTNAME` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `LASTNAME` varchar(45) DEFAULT NULL,
  `USERNAME` varchar(45) DEFAULT NULL,
  `ROLE` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `PASSWORD` varchar(45) DEFAULT NULL,
  `AGE` int(11) NOT NULL
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

ALTER TABLE `USERS`
  ADD PRIMARY KEY (`ID`),
  ADD KEY `AGE` (`AGE`);

Results of EXPLAIN queries. The first three statements use the index. The second set of statements ignore the index and do a full table scan.

The range of AGE is random between 20 and 100 years. There are 1000 rows in the table.

/* utilizes the index on AGE */
/* case 1 */
SELECT ID, AGE  FROM USERS WHERE AGE > 20; 

/* case 2 */
SELECT AGE  FROM USERS WHERE AGE > 44;

/* case 3 */
SELECT * FROM USERS WHERE AGE > 84;


/* does not use index on AGE */

/* case 4 */
SELECT AGE, FIRSTNAME FROM USERS WHERE AGE > 83;

/* case 5 */
SELECT * FROM USERS WHERE AGE > 83;

/* case 6 */
SELECT AGE FROM USERS WHERE AGE > 18;

Some observations that I have seen. Can anyone confirm my conclusions are correct?

1) SELECT * will use the index when 15% or fewer of the rows are selected. 2) SELECT AGE will use the index when 1 or more rows are selected.

  • Use formatting tools to make your post more readable. Use code blocking for code and log and error texts and bold and italics to highlight things – Prateek Jul 13 at 1:33
  • I presume these are all tested against the same table. Case 3 and case 5 are particularly puzzling. Possibly retest with caching disabled (i.e. `SELECT SQL_NO_CACHE <rest of query>). – Joshua R. Jul 13 at 2:32

The 15% is usually around 20%, and it depends on statistics gleaned from data in the table. I saw someone nail down about 29% as the cutoff in his query. You are actually hitting 20%:

(100-85+1)/(100-20+1) = 19.8%
(100-84+1)/(100-20+1) = 21.0%

So, that explains cases 3, 4, 5. The rationale is that for a high percentage, a table scan is more efficient than bouncing between the index BTree and the data+PK BTree.

The index is "covering" for these two. That is, all the necessary columns are found in a single index. Hence, it should use the index, not do a table scan:

SELECT AGE ...
SELECT ID, AGE ...

Note: In InnoDB, secondary indexes include the PRIMARY KEY implicitly. That is, INDEX(age) is virtually the same as INDEX(age, id).

That explains case 1 and 2, but fails to explain case 6. Case 6 should have used the index to return the entire list of AGEs. (not 0 rows, as your comment states??)

Your tests are the tip of the iceberg, but you have gotten a lot farther than most beginners at trying to fathom the depths of MySQL's relatively simple Optimizer. (I have several years' head start on you.)

There are a few more Rules of Thumb here .

Please continue experimenting and publishing your results.

  • Great response, but not clear to me how 3 (used index) and 5 (didn't) are explained by your first statement. Could you elaborate? – Joshua R. Jul 13 at 2:45
  • 1
    @JoshuaR. - Case 3 had fewer index rows to touch, so the back and forth was deemed not-too-costly. Case 5 had more. – Rick James Jul 13 at 3:00

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