-1
         1
        333
       55555
      7777777
     999999999

Program to print number pyramid. I want to print this pattern in Java.

My code:

private static void pyramid() {
    System.out.println("Please Enter any number less than 10 : ");
    Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
    int num = scan.nextInt();
    int temp = num;
    for (int row = 0; row <= num; row++) {

        for (int column = 0; column < temp; column++) {

            System.out.print(" ");
        }
        temp--;
        for (int k = 0; k <= row-1; k++) {
            if (row % 2 != 0) {
                System.out.print(row);
            }
            System.out.println();
        }

    }
}

And I am getting following output:

Please Enter any number less than 10 : 

9
                 1


      3
3
3




    5
5
5
5
5






  7
7
7
7
7
7
7








9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
3
  • 1
    Provide the code you've tried yourself. – Jorge.V Jul 13 '18 at 6:05
  • added my code and output – Priya Singh Jul 13 '18 at 6:16
  • Probably the problem with your code is that you're getting extra printlns. Try moving your println statement out of the loop it's in, so it goes at the end (same level of indentation as temp--;) – Rick Jul 13 '18 at 6:26
2
System.out.println("    1");
System.out.println("   333");
System.out.println("  55555");
System.out.println(" 7777777");
System.out.println("999999999");

Your teacher probably wants you to use loops.

So you should note that the bulk standard for loop which programmers can bang out with their eyes closed:

for (int i = 0; i < someNumber; i++) {
  //..
}

Is fairly configurable. For instance the i++ at the end means to increment i, but we could increment by bigger amounts (or decrement, or do some other funky things like stepping through a list of objects and so on and so forth).

e.g.

i += 3;

Will increase i by three.

You can also nest loops inside one another, e.g.

for (int i = 1; i < 10; i+=2) {
  String s = "";
  for (int j = 0; j < i; j++) {
    s += i;
  }
  System.out.println(s);
}

The padding at the front I leave as an exercise to the reader.


Note that this pattern (one loop inside another, and the inner loop being bounded by the outer loops counter) is actually quite common 'out in the wild', and so is worth investing the time to understand.

2
  • 1
    An upvote for a selection of good hints without doing someone's homework for them. Good work! – halfer Jul 13 '18 at 6:29
  • 2
    Upvoted just for the precious jewel of appropriate usage of humour! – GhostCat Jul 13 '18 at 6:34

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