2

There was a question regarding this exercise in this forum, but it dose not answer my specific question. This exercise asks to draw the environmental diagrams for

(define x (cons 1 2))
(define z (cons x x))
(set-car! (cdr z) 17)
(car x)

where cons, set-car! and car are defined as

(define (cons x y)
  (define (set-x! v) (set! x v))
  (define (set-y! v) (set! y v))
  (define (dispatch m)
    (cond ((eq? m 'car) x)
          ((eq? m 'cdr) y)
          ((eq? m 'set-car!) set-x!)
          ((eq? m 'set-cdr!) set-y!)
          (else (error "Undefined operation -- CONS" m))))
  dispatch)
(define (car z) (z 'car))
(define (cdr z) (z 'cdr))
(define (set-car! z new-value)
  ((z 'set-car!) new-value)
  z)
(define (set-cdr! z new-value)
  ((z 'set-cdr!) new-value)
  z)

The first two are very straightforward. My question is regarding the third one (set-car! (cdr z) 17) The Environmental Diagram I obtained is like this

enter image description here

Based on SICP textbook (section 3.2.1): To apply a procedure to arguments, create a new environment containing a frame that binds the parameters to the values of the arguments. The enclosing environment of this frame is the environment specified by the procedure.

Thus (define x (cons 1 2)) creates environment E1. (define z (cons x x)) creates E2.

The following parts I am not so sure, what I thought is: because procedure set-car! pointed to global environment, I think (set-car! (cdr z) 17) should create E3 which is enclosed in global. With the same logic, (cdr z) should create E4 under global, as cdr is also defined under global and points to global.

Then, evaluating (cdr z) invokes (z 'cdr). Because z points to E2, E5 is created under E2, with body of function dispatch and formal parameter m as 'cdr. This is evaluated to x which has its binding in global environment. Thus the formal parameters of set-car! are z bonded to x whose binding can be found through E3 to global E and new-value bonded to 17 in E3 directly.

Then by evaluating (set-car! z new-value), (z 'set-car!) evaluates first. As z is bonded to x pointed to E1, E6 is created with its formal parameter bonded to 'set-car! and the function body is dispatch in E1. The return value is procedure set-x! whose binding is found in E1. Evaluating of set-x! create E7 under E1 and new-value is assigned to its formal parameter v.

My question is how set-x! finds the value of new-value which assigned in a separate environment E3? It we trace the parents environments from E7 to E1 then global, it will never guide to E3 where the new-value bonded to 17.

Based on the sentence in SICP, E3 must be created under global when applying set-car!. Some solutions online skip the creation of E3 and E4 under global and assign 17 directly in E7, which I think is not correct. Because it is written clearly in SICP that when applying a procedure a new environment is created under the environment specified by the procedure.

Please help me to understand this. Thank you.

Update

To be more clear, I translate the code to python and run it under PyTutor http://www.pythontutor.com/. What I do not understand is between step 34 and 35 as shown in the pictures below

Step 34: enter image description here

Step 35: enter image description here

As you can see from step 34, setcar(cdr(z), 17) created a environment under global environment with the name newvalue bound to 17. In the next step (35), the evaluation of setx created a separate environment under the parent f1 (created by cons(1,2)). These are all clear for me.

What I do not understand is how it is possible in this environment created by setx, the binding of newvalue which is in a separate environment (setcar) can be found and assign to formal parameter of setx, v, as 17.

As I understand from SICP, the procedures will look in their own environments and their parents sequentially for name binding. But here, the environment that setcar pointed to is independent from the environment setx pointed to and its parent environment (f1). How the cross environments look-up is possible here?

Below is the python code can be tested in PyTutor with the link I gave above.

def cons(x, y):
    def setx(v):
        nonlocal x
        x=v
    def sety(v):
        nonlocal y
        y=v
    def dispatch(m):
        if m == 'car': return x
        elif m == 'cdr': return y
        elif m == 'setcar': return setx
        elif m == 'setcdr': return sety
        else: print("Undefined operation -- CONS", m)
    return dispatch

def car(z):
    return z('car')

def cdr(z):
    return z('cdr')

def setcar(z, newvalue):
    z('setcar')(newvalue)
    return z

def setcdr(z, newvalue):
    z('setcdr')(newvalue)
    return z

x = cons(1,2)
z = cons(x,x)
setcar(cdr(z), 17)
car(x)

Updated 2

Thanks to Will Ness's brilliant answer, the problem is clarified and below is my update for the environment diagram

enter image description here

  • related, almost duplicate (no pictures though). short recap of the answer: there's no E3. – Will Ness Jul 13 '18 at 15:49
  • I use my own textual representation for the environment frames, in the answer linked above. I can't follow these pictograms. :) --- see the illustrative sequence after the sentence "So when we call (((cons 1 2) 'set-car!) 17), it is progressively interpreted as ...". What is unclear there? – Will Ness Jul 13 '18 at 15:58
  • 1
    "it is written clearly in SICP that when applying a procedure a new environment is created under the environment specified by the procedure" this is done temporarily; then the answer is found and returned, and that environment is discarded. – Will Ness Jul 13 '18 at 16:06
  • @WillNess Thanks for your kind and valuable comment. Unfortunately I do see a E3, as shown clearly in the PyTutor plot in my updates. In PyTutor plot, the environment "setcar" under global is exactly what I have E3 in my plot which is created with evaluating set-car! (or setcar in python). What is unclear for me is then, why the name binding of new-value in this environment can be found in by set-x! which is inherited from E1 (created with (define x (cons 1 2))) not E3. Please have a look at my update python code and PyTutor output. Thanks again. – englealuze Jul 16 '18 at 11:43
  • @WillNess "this is done temporarily; then the answer is found and returned, and that environment is discarded." I think whether the environment is temporary is not the point. The problem for me is to understand why answer can be founded. For me, the name "new-value" is bound in a different environment then where procedure set-x! pointed to. And there is no inherit relation between these 2 different environments. Based on the evaluation rule defined in SICP, there should be no way for set-x! to find out the so called "new-value" for v is 17. – englealuze Jul 16 '18 at 11:52
2

With your Python code (which I'll regard as a pseudocode with Scheme-like semantics),

def cons(x, y):
    def setx(v):
        nonlocal x
        x=v
    def sety(v):
        nonlocal y
        y=v
    def dispatch(m):
        if m == 'car': return x
        elif m == 'cdr': return y
        elif m == 'setcar': return setx
        elif m == 'setcdr': return sety
        else: print("Undefined operation -- CONS", m)
    return dispatch

def car(z):
    return z('car')

def cdr(z):
    return z('cdr')

def setcar(z, newvalue):
    z('setcar')(newvalue)
    return z

def setcdr(z, newvalue):
    z('setcdr')(newvalue)
    return z

we have (in pseudocode)

# xx = cons(1,2)
Exx = { x=1, y=2, setx={Exx,setx_proc}, sety={Exx,sety_proc}, 
        dispatch={Exx,dispatch_proc} }
xx = Exx.dispatch

sets xx to hold a value, a closure of dispatch procedure and its enclosing cons environment frame -- let's call this closure Exx -- with entries under x, y, setx, sety, and dispatch; in the place x there's stored the value 1, and in y - the value 2; then,

# zz = cons(xx,xx)
Ezz = { x=Exx.dispatch, y=Exx.dispatch, setx={Ezz,setx_proc}, sety={Ezz,sety_proc}, 
        dispatch={Ezz,dispatch_proc} }
zz = Ezz.dispatch

sets zz to hold a value, a closure of dispatch procedure and its enclosing cons environment frame -- let's call this closure Ezz -- with entries under x, y, setx, sety, and dispatch; in the place x there's stored the value of xx, Exx.dispatch, and in y - also the value of xx, Exx.dispatch; then,

setcar(cdr(zz), 17)                     # find the value of the argument
1. = setcar(cdr(zz), 17)                # find the value of the argument
2. = setcar(cdr(Ezz.dispatch), 17)      # zz is Ezz.dispatch !
3. = setcar(Ezz.dispatch('cdr'), 17)    # by the def'n of cdr
4. = setcar(Ezz.y, 17)                  # by the def'n of dispatch
5. = setcar(Exx.dispatch, 17)           # in Ezz.y there's Exx.dispatch !
6. =   Exx.dispatch('setcar')(17) ; return(Exx.dispatch)     # by the def'n of setcar
7. =   Exx.setx(17) ; return(Exx.dispatch)     # Exx.dispatch to Exx.setx !
8. =   Exx.x=17 ; return(Exx.dispatch)         # by the def'n of setx
9. = Exx.dispatch                       # where Exx.x=17, Exx.y=2

The evaluation of 7. Exx.setx(17) does not create any new environment frames. This setx belongs to Exx frame, and thus refers to the Exx's entry under x.

And so the x place in the Exx environment frame is updated to hold the value 17.

So then, afterwards,

car(xx)
= car(Exx.dispatch)
= Exx.dispatch('car')
= Exx.x
= 17
  • thanks for this detailed answer. I think I had before misunderstandings that as you pointed out setx does not create any new environment frames.The argument z for setcar finally returned as setx under Exx and the newvalue of 17 is feed then to this function. I can either use the substitution model here considering function operands as place holders, or think that execution of setx is under setcar environment where newvalue is bonded. There is no separate environment of setx. Look-up happened in Ezz and when the body of setx is found, its body is returned and it is done. – englealuze Jul 17 '18 at 7:44
  • thanks a lot again. if I may ask a follow-up question, I realize that some environments are temporary, some are not. I feel it is very critical for me to distinguish them in order to understand the evaluation properly. Do you think there is a general rule tells which Envs are temp and which are permanent? It looks for me from this exercise that when a function that has closure structure is evaluated, a permanent Env will be generated, otherwise it is always temp Env. Is that true in general? – englealuze Jul 17 '18 at 8:12
  • welcome. :) when a function with arguments is entered, a new environment frame is always created. then the function's result value is calculated to be returned. if that return value refers to any environment frame, that frame will be preserved together with the returned value, naturally. E.g., returning the Ezz.dispatch value. If we were returning Ezz.x value, no environment frame would need preserving! But Ezz.dispatch itself refers to a closure, a pairing up of the dispatch procedure and its creation environment -- because that procedure refers to that env's entries: x, setx, etc. – Will Ness Jul 17 '18 at 8:23
1

I still have the scars from this exercise which, unfortunately, I did before this question was posted.

In case it's of any help, here's my diagram which I think is consistent with the one in the question above, the main difference is an attempt to draw all the lines between procedures and the references to them.

            para: x                                        para: z
            para: y              para: z      para: z      para: new-value
          (define (set-x!...    (z 'car)     (z 'cdr)     ((z 'set-car!)...
                ^                  ^            ^               ^
                │                  │            │               │
                @ @ ─┐             @ @ ─┐       @ @ ─┐          @ @ ─┐
                 ^   │              ^   │        ^   │           ^   │
global env ──┐   │   │              │   │        │   │           │   │
             v   │   v              │   v        │   v           │   v
┌──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┐
│cons:───────────┘                  │            │               │         │
│car:───────────────────────────────┘            │               │         │
│cdr:────────────────────────────────────────────┘               │         │
│set-car!:───────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘         │
│                                                                          │
│(after calls to cons)                                                     │
│x:┐                                  z:┐                                  │
└──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
 ┌─┘                             ^      │                               ^
 │                               │      │                               │
 │ ,───────────────────────────────────────────────<──┐                 │
 │/                              │      │             │                 │
 │ ,────────────────────────────────────────────<──┐  │                 │
 │/                              │      │          │  │                 │
 │                               │      │          │  │                 │
 │              call to cons     │      │          │  │   call to cons  │
 v      ┌────────────────────────┴──┐   │      ┌────────────────────────┴──┐
 │      │x: 1 (17 after set-x!)     │   │      │x:─┘  │                    │
 │ E1 ->│y: 2                       │   │ E2 ->│y:────┘                    │
 │      │set-x!:────────────────┐   │   │      │set-x!:────────────────┐   │
 │      │set-y!:─────────┐      │   │   │      │set-y!:─────────┐      │   │
 │      │dispatch:┐      │      │   │   │      │dispatch:┐      │      │   │
 │      └───────────────────────────┘   │      └───────────────────────────┘
 │                │  ^   │  ^   │  ^    │                │  ^   │  ^   │  ^
 ├──>─────────────┤  │   │  │   │  │    └───┬──>─────────┤  │   │  │   │  │
 │                v  │   v  │   v  │        │            v  │   v  │   v  │
 │               @ @ │  @ @ │  @ @ │        │           @ @ │  @ @ │  @ @ │
 │               │ └─┘  │ └─┘  │ └─┘        │           │ └─┘  │ └─┘  │ └─┘
 │               │      │      │            │           │      │      │
 │               ├──────────────────────────────────────┘      │      │
 │               │      └───────────────────────────┬──────────┘      │
 │               │             └────────────────────│───────────────┬─┘
 │               │                          │       │               │
 │               v                          │       v               v
 │          parameter: m                    │  parameter: v    parameter: v
 │   (define (dispatch m)                   │   (set! x v)      (set! y v)
 │        (cond ((eq? m 'car) x)            │
 │              ((eq? m 'cdr) y)            ^
 │              ((eq? m 'set-car!) set-x!)  │
 │              ((eq? m 'set-cdr!) set-y!)  │
 │              (else ... )))               │
 ^                                          │
 │                                          └─────────┐
 ├─────────┐                                          │
 │         │   call set-car!                          │
 │      ┌───────────────────────────┐                 │
 │      │z:┘                        │                 ^
 │ E3 ─>│new-value: 17              ├─> global env    │
 │      │                           │                 │
 │      └───────────────────────────┘                 │
 │                                                    │
 │                                        ┌───────────┘
 │                         call to cdr    │
 │                ┌───────────────────────────┐
 │                │z:─────────────────────┘   │
 │           E4 ─>│                           ├─> global env
 │                │                           │
 │                └───────────────────────────┘
 │
 │
 │                               call to z (dispatch)
 │                          ┌───────────────────────────┐
 │                          │m: 'cdr                    │
 │                     E5 ─>│                           ├─> E2
 │                          │                           │
 │                          └───────────────────────────┘
 │                           (returns 'x' (E1 dispatch))
 │
 ^
 │
 │                    call to z (dispatch)
 │                ┌───────────────────────────┐
 │                │m: 'set-car                │
 │           E6 ─>│                           ├─> E1
 │                │                           │
 │                └───────────────────────────┘
 │
 │
 │                                 call to set-x!
 │                          ┌───────────────────────────┐
 │                          │v: 17                      │
 │                     E7 ─>│                           ├─> E1
 │                          │                           │
 │                          └───────────────────────────┘
 │                                 (E1 modified)
 ^
 │
 └─────────┐
           │     call to car
        ┌───────────────────────────┐
        │z:┘                        │
   E8 ─>│                           ├─> global env
        │                           │
        └───────────────────────────┘


                      call to z (dispatch)
                  ┌───────────────────────────┐
                  │m: 'car                    │
             E9 ─>│                           ├─> E1
                  │                           │
                  └───────────────────────────┘
                         (returns 17)
  • personally, I don't find this notation immediately helpful. I'm quickly lost in all its symbols. It's like a whole another language. maybe it's because I didn't study it. :) I find let rewrites helpful (when we replace application code with an equivalent let-based code). there's an answer of mine about Y combinator where I first used it, if you like to see it in action. :) – Will Ness Apr 12 '19 at 9:50
  • Broadly I agree. I have no idea if this 'notation' is used anywhere else, but I don't think it is good (or intended?) for general use. I put 'notation' in quotes because it is so woolly. But in the context of the book I think it has value. E.g. illustrating how a single code block is referenced by multiple procedures and how a single procedure can have multiple aliases, six in the case of the first dispatch. I'm now in ch. 4 starting to implement the language and I think this diagram serves as a link between the code and its implementation. I'll check the y-combinator post. Thanks. – codybartfast Apr 12 '19 at 13:51

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