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I've disassembled a x86 elf binary that was making use of the C scanf function.
Here is the disassembled chunk of code related to scanf :

0x0804857a      89442404       mov dword [esp + 0x4], eax  
0x0804857e      c70424b28604.  mov dword [esp], 0x80486b2                                 
0x08048585      e8eafdffff     call sym.imp.scanf  

Checking with gdb, the memory at the address 0x80486b2 contains the data 0x7325 ("%s" string in ASCII code).
So what this code apparently does is pushing scanf parameters in reverse order on the stack so as to call scanf with these two arguments.
This would have been typically coded in C as scanf ("%s", &somevar);

What I would have expected here given the assembly code is that the 32-bit representation of the constant 0x80486b2 gets loaded into the address pointed to by the stack pointer ...
But rather, the mov instruction has loaded the 32-bit representation of whatever was at the address 0x80486b2 into the address pointed to by the stack pointer ... Is that right ?

So what we basically get is that mov has just moved around data from a memory location to another memory location, which according to this x86 assembly introduction (among a plethora of others sources) is illicit (emphasis is mine):

In cases where memory transfers are desired, the source memory contents must first be loaded into a register, then can be stored to the destination memory address.

No register has been made use of here as intermediary.
How is that possible ?

  • Only in AT&T syntax is a bare number considered a memory operand (an absolute address). You're using Intel syntax, specifically NASM from ndisasm it looks like. – Peter Cordes Jul 13 '18 at 23:27
  • @petercordes Could you expand your point a bit more ? I used gdb with the flag architecture-flavor=Intel actually. How can a simple syntax matter have an influence on the code ? – programmersn Jul 14 '18 at 9:24
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    I assumed you were used to AT&T syntax, where 0x80486b2 is a memory operand, hence the question. (In AT&T, $0x80486b2 is an immediate). The machine code is a mov r/m32, imm32, but different syntaxes represent that instruction in different ways. – Peter Cordes Jul 14 '18 at 12:59
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    Maybe the GDB makes you think the actual "%s" was copied, because when you check stack content, it will automatically print the address value + content (for programmer convenience)? But the stack memory contains just that value 0x80486b2, the string bytes '%', 's', 0 don't reside in the memory pointed to by esp, they are still at 0x80486b2 address in memory. – Ped7g Jul 14 '18 at 17:28
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If I understand well, the mov instruction here loaded the 32-bit representation of whatever was at the address 0x80486b2 into the address pointed to by the stack pointer ... Is that right ?

No. The instruction

mov dword [esp], 0x80486b2

copies the immediate value 0x80486B2 to the address pointed to by the register ESP. This place is the first parameter passed to the scanf function.

So what we basically get is that mov has just moved around data from a memory location to another memory location, [...]

No. The instruction moves an immediate 32-bit value to a memory location. The instruction's signature of the MOV in this case is:

MOV r/m32, imm32        Move imm32 to r/m32.

The value 0x80486b2 is written to the DWORD memory address pointed to by the register ESP.

The instruction mov dword [esp + 0x4], eax does pass the second parameter from EAX to scanf.

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    In other words: it does not copy the value at the address to the stack, it copies the address itself (an immediate value) to the stack. So this is not a memory-to-memory copy. After all, scanf expects a pointer (address) as first argument. – Rudy Velthuis Jul 14 '18 at 20:55
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The instruction mov dword [esp], 0x80486b2 moves the 32-bit immediate value 0x80486b2 into the 32-bit memory location pointed to by ESP. If it moved the 32-bit value at stored the address 0x80486b2 into the destination, then it would be written as mov dword [esp], dword [0x80486b2]. However, this is not an allowed combination of operands for the MOV instruction.

Note that your disassembly is using NASM syntax.

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