5

This question already has an answer here:

I would like to create an new object from a bigger one, by copying only a few properties from it. All the solutions I know are not very elegant, I wonder if there is a better choice, native if possible (no additional function like at the end of the following code)?

Here is what I usually do for now:

// I want to keep only x, y, and z properties:
let source = {
    x: 120,
    y: 200,
    z: 150,
    radius: 10,
    color: 'red',
};

// 1st method (not elegant, especially with even more properties):
let coords1 = {
    x: source.x,
    y: source.y,
    z: source.z,
};

// 2nd method (problem: it pollutes the current scope):
let {x, y, z} = source, coords2 = {x, y, z};

// 3rd method (quite hard to read for such simple task):
let coords3 = {};
for (let attr of ['x','y','z']) coords3[attr] = source[attr];

// Similar to the 3rd method, using a function:
function extract(src, ...props) {
    let obj = {};
    props.map(prop => obj[prop] = src[prop]);
    return obj;
}
let coords4 = extract(source, 'x', 'y', 'z');

marked as duplicate by Bergi javascript Jul 31 '18 at 15:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

13

One way to do it is through object destructuring and an arrow function:

let source = {
    x: 120,
    y: 200,
    z: 150,
    radius: 10,
    color: 'red',
};

let result = (({ x, y, z }) => ({ x, y, z }))(source);

console.log(result);

The way this works is that the arrow function (({ x, y, z }) => ({ x, y, z })) is immediately called with source as the parameter. It destructures source into x, y, and z, and then immediately returns those as a new object.

5

Just take a function.

const extract = ({ x, y, z }) => ({ x, y, z });

let source = { x: 120, y: 200, z: 150, radius: 10, color: 'red' };

console.log(extract(source));

Another solution is a destructuring to a target object with target properties.

let source = { x: 120, y: 200, z: 150, radius: 10, color: 'red' }, 
    target = {};

({ x: target.x, y: target.y, z: target.z } = source);

console.log(target);

3

IIFE with destructuring maybe?:

const coords = (({x, y, z}) => ({x, y, z}))(source);
1

For simple cases like this the object destructuring mentioned in other answers is very neat but tends to look a bit cumbersome when dealing with larger structures as you double up on property names.

Expanding on your own answer - if you were going to write an extract utility (I'll roll my own for fun)... you can make it more flexible by currying it - allowing you to swap the order of the arguments (notably putting the data source last) while still being variadic in accepting property names.

I'd consider this signature: extract = (...props) => src => { ... } more elegant as it allows for a greater degree of reuse in composing new, named functions:

const extract = (...props) => src => 
    Object.entries(src).reduce(
        (obj, [key, val]) => (
            props.includes(key) && (obj[key] = val), 
            obj
    ), {})

const getCoords = extract('x', 'y', 'z')

const source = {
    x: 120,
    y: 200,
    z: 150,
    radius: 10,
    color: 'red'
}

console.log(getCoords(source))

1

You can do it like below via Spread Operator

let source = {
    x: 120,
    y: 200,
    z: 150,
    radius: 10,
    color: 'red',
};

let {radius, color, ...newObj} = source;
console.log(newObj);

  • Not really what i expected, but i learned a nice feature! – yolenoyer Jul 14 '18 at 15:36
  • 1
    Handy if the properties to exclude are known and not too many! (+1) – trincot Jul 20 '18 at 15:18
  • @trincot thanks for your comment and noticing the purpose. Thanks again! – VicJordan Jul 20 '18 at 15:20
  • This is an "omit" rather than "pick" :) – Dan Dascalescu Jun 14 at 5:51
0

You can try reduce over [x,y,z] array:

let source = {
    x: 120,
    y: 200,
    z: 150,
    radius: 10,
    color: 'red',
};

const coords = ['x','y','z'].reduce((a,c) => Object.assign(a,{[c]: source[c]}), {});

console.log(coords);
0

1st method is elegant and readable.

Please don't obfuscate simple operations by some workarounds. Other people who will need to maintain this code, including future yourself will be very thankful in the future.

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