52

I have a function that calls another function which returns a Result. I need to check if the Result is Ok or Err and if it is an Err, I need to return early from my function. This is what I'm doing now:

match callable(&mut param) {
    Ok(_v) => (),
    Err(_e) => return,
};

Is there a more idiomatic Rust way to do this?

1

4 Answers 4

39

Rust 1.65.0 has stabilized let-else statements, which enables you to write:

let Ok(_v) = callable(&mut param) else { return };
1
  • 5
    This is my go-to method for Option<T> because I know my else block is literally dealing with nothing. But for Result<O, Error> I use the OP's method because I want to record the error object in the log before kicking it back.
    – Fred Drake
    Feb 22, 2023 at 1:52
32

You can create a macro:

macro_rules! unwrap_or_return {
    ( $e:expr ) => {
        match $e {
            Ok(x) => x,
            Err(_) => return,
        }
    }
}

fn callable(param: &mut i32) -> Result<i32, ()> {
    Ok(*param)
}

fn main() {
    let mut param = 0;
    let res = unwrap_or_return!(callable(&mut param));

    println!("{:?}", res);
}

Note that I wouldn't recommend discarding the errors. Rust's error handling is pretty ergonomic, so I would return the error, even if it is only to log it:

fn callable(param: &mut i32) -> Result<i32, ()> {
    Ok(*param)
}

fn run() -> Result<(), ()> {
    let mut param = 0;
    let res = callable(&mut param)?;

    println!("{:?}", res);

    Ok(())
}

fn main() {
    if let Err(()) = run() {
        println!("Oops, something went wrong!");
    }
}
8
  • Thank you. I also changed your macro to allow the caller to specify whether to return or continue. Is that idiomatic rust? Jul 15, 2018 at 20:50
  • What is the difference between the macro you created here and the ? operator? Dec 23, 2020 at 13:43
  • 1
    @Raul The ? operator can only be used in a function that returns a Try implementor. The OP wants to return from a function that returns unit, and unit does not implement Try.
    – Boiethios
    Dec 28, 2020 at 10:04
  • 1
    It is a good idea to add an indirection by adding run() that returns a Result, for two reasons: 1) inside run(), you can use ? to handle error returns; 2) you can then log/process all error returns in a single place. IMO, this is better than creating a macro. Nov 1, 2021 at 17:56
  • 1
    @Boiethios that's okay. Whether the main() can return a result does not matter. My point was that: when a function foo returns () and we still want to use ? to do early returns inside foo, it is a good idea to add a layer of bar() -> Result() that includes the actual code to allow ? early returns, then foo will call bar and log the error. Nov 3, 2021 at 21:07
5

If both functions return Result<doesn't matter, same T> you can just put a ? at the end of line of call.

fn caller() -> Result<Str, i32> {
    let number = job()?; // <-- if job return error this function return/end here 
                         // otherwise the value of Ok will assign to number 
    Ok(format!("the number is {}", number))
}

fn job() -> Result<i32, i32> {
    // do something
    Err(3)
}

You can use same pattern for Option<T> too.

2
  • 3
    It's pretty clear from OPs example code that this isn't the case: Err(_e) => return,
    – Shepmaster
    Jul 15, 2018 at 20:13
  • All thought this isn't the answer to the question above. I've remembered that there was SOME syntax like this, but not what exactly, and I couldn't find it until now. So kudos for the answer! Nov 25, 2021 at 11:30
2

You can use my unwrap_or crate to accomplish this.

You can do:

unwrap_or_ok!(callable(&mut param), _, return);

And if you want the result and to return the error, you can do:

let v = unwrap_or_ok!(callable(&mut param), error, return error);

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