2

I've seen many javascript objects that have a 'init' method that you pass in values to in order to setup the object.

How do they internally handle the initializations of their private variables when passed in a array of name/value pairs like:

myObject.init( {prop1: "blah", prop2: "asdf", ..., propn: "n"} );

Specifically, some of these values can be optional, so how would you setup defaults and then override them if the name/value pair was passed in during the init.

7
var myObject = {
  init: function(options) {
    this.foo = options.foo || 'some default';
    this.bar = options.requiredArg;

    if (!this.bar) raiseSomeError();
  }
}
  • 1
    this also fails if options.foo evaluates as false – Paul Dixon Feb 4 '09 at 21:50
  • 1
    I suppose if you really need to support that case: this.foo = options.foo == null ? 'some default' : options.foo; – Alex Wayne Feb 4 '09 at 23:03
  • Is init the only function that can use that syntax? or could we also define a seperate function using functionName: function(passedParam){}? – Kamron K. Nov 15 '12 at 4:28
  • @KamronK. There is nothing special about a function named init. Any function can use this pattern. – Alex Wayne Nov 15 '12 at 18:05
4

The cleanest way I can think of would be to use a defaults object that contains all of the default properties as follows:

function init( args ) {
    this.value = 'value' in args ? args.value : defaults.value;
}

You could even iterate over the default object using a for loop so that you don't have to keep track of which properties you want the object to contain.

You should use the "in" operator since it is possible to actually set the value of a property to undefined. It is valid to set a property to undefined and in that case it is actually considered set, the only way to ensure that a value was not set is to check that it isn't in the object at all.

4

This tests ok on FF5, IE8, Chrome 12, Opera v11.5. It doesn't matter what the default values are, they will be overwritten if their key is in the calling list, if not they will be left alone.

var myObject = {
   prop1: 'default1',
   prop2: 'default2',
   prop3: 'default3',
   prop4: 'default4',
   prop5: 'default5',
   prop6: 'default6',
   init: function(options) {
      for(key in options) {
         if(this.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
            this[key] = options[key]
         }
      }
   }
}

myObject.init( {prop1: "blah", prop2: "asdf", prop5: "n"} )
2

Better still, get the init method out of the object so you can use init for other objects.

This tests ok on FF5, IE8, Chrome 12, Opera v11.5. It doesn't matter what the default values are, they will be overwritten if their key is in the calling list, if not they will be left alone.

var myGlobal = {
   init: function(obj, options) {
      for(key in options) {
         if(obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
            obj[key] = options[key]
         }
      }
   }
}

var myObject = {
   prop1: 'default1',
   prop2: 'default2',
   prop3: 'default3',
   prop4: 'default4',
   prop5: 'default5',
   prop6: 'default6'
}

myGlobal.init( myObject, {prop1: "blah", prop2: "asdf", prop5: "n"} )
1

oh lets see

edit: updated, this actually works

 
function myObject(){}

myObject.prototype.init = function (argObj)
{
    if (!argObj)
    {
        argObj = new Object();
    }

    var abc = (argObj['abc'] != undefined) ? argObj['abc'] : "default value 1";
    var defg = (argObj['defg'] != undefined) ? argObj['defg'] : "default value 2";
}
  • fails if args['abc'] evaluates as false – Paul Dixon Feb 4 '09 at 21:41
  • still broken, what if I pass {abc:0}? I get the default value instead. – Paul Dixon Feb 4 '09 at 21:49
  • heh, good catch Paul, I wonder how many occurrences of that I have in old code! Anyway, I fixed it, its not pretty but it works. – Allen Rice Feb 4 '09 at 21:55
  • Use the identity comparator !== for comparison with undefined. – bobince Feb 5 '09 at 2:01
0

You could use a ternary operator to check whether an element of the initialisation array is set, and use it if it is, or use a default if not. For example, assuming the initialization data is passed as an object called init....

var myObject = {
  init: function(opts) {
     this.foo=(typeof(opts.foo)!="undefined")?opts.foo:'default value';
  }
}

Alternatively, you could just copy init array overriding previously set values

var myObject = {
  init: function(opts) {
      this.foo='default value';

      for (name in opts)
      {
         this[name]=opts[name];
      }
  }

Note that an idiom like

this.foo = opts.foo || 'some default';

Fails if opts.foo is set to a value which evaluates to false, e.g. 0

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