4

Suppose I have a list of two matrices, x and y.

 x <- c(3,4,5,5,
3,4,5,6,
5,6,2,1)

x <- matrix(x,3,4)

y <- c(3,4,5,5,
3,4,5,6,
5,5,2,1)

y <- matrix(y,3,4)

d <- list(x, y)

> x
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    3    5    5    6
[2,]    4    3    6    2
[3,]    5    4    5    1

> y
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    3    5    5    5
[2,]    4    3    6    2
[3,]    5    4    5    1

I would like to compare each row of these two matrices using the identical function. Here, the two matrices are the same unless for the last element of the first row.

How could I compare these two matrices, row by row? Any help, please?

My tried is:

res <- round(apply(array(unlist(d), c(4, 4, 4)), c(1,2), identical),2)

(from there "I tried the code used here)

But I have got an error:

Error in FUN(newX[, i], ...) : argument "y" is missing, with no default

Please note that the element of the list is arbitrary. That is, sometimes, I have only 2 matrices, however, another time may I have 6 matrices

The expected output should be like this

output:
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    TRUE    TRUE    TRUE    FALSE
[2,]    TRUE    TRUE    TRUE    TRUE
[3,]    TRUE    TRUE    TRUE    TRUE
  • 1
    You want row by row or element by element? If you want to check if they are identical, whats the point doing it row by row? Also, can you have more than two matrices in a list? – David Arenburg Jul 15 '18 at 10:53
  • 2
    @DavidArenburg I'm guessing they actually want to see where it's different. – zacdav Jul 15 '18 at 10:54
  • @DavidArenburg Thank you so much for your comment. My original funciton is very difficult. I store the result of a specific output of a model as a matrix. Hence, I really need to compare it pair-by pair. Sometimes the dimension of my matrix is 100. – Maryam Jul 15 '18 at 10:55
  • So how do you want to compare 3 or 4 matrices? e.g., how would your desired output look like? – David Arenburg Jul 15 '18 at 10:57
  • Hence, If I compare them row-by-row (element by element) it will become more easy for me. – Maryam Jul 15 '18 at 10:57
5

1) This defines Identical to be a function which returns TRUE if all its arguments are identical. It does this by computing the sd of its arguments and comparing that to zero. The second line of code applies this to the corresponding elements of the matrices.

Identical <- function(...) sd(c(...)) == 0
array(do.call("mapply", c(Identical, d)), dim(d[[1]]))

giving:

     [,1] [,2] [,3]  [,4]
[1,] TRUE TRUE TRUE FALSE
[2,] TRUE TRUE TRUE  TRUE
[3,] TRUE TRUE TRUE  TRUE

A few alternate ways to define Identical. These have the advantage that they work with non-numeric matrices as well. The second one uses identical as requested.

Identical <- function(...) all(c(...)[-1] == ..1)

Identical <- function(...) all(sapply(c(...)[-1], identical, ..1))

2) This alternate method is only one line of code and uses the whole object approach with no explicit use of dimensions or indexes. It unlists d and applies sd over corresponding elements of that using tapply. Finally it compares that to zero.

tapply(unlist(d), list(sapply(d, row), sapply(d, col)), sd) == 0

2a) A variation is to define the comparison as a separate function:

Same <- function(x) sd(x) == 0
tapply(unlist(d), list(sapply(d, row), sapply(d, col)), Same)

That makes it easier to define alternatives by redefining Same such as the following where the second definition uses identical.

Same <- function(x) all(x[-1] == x[1])

Same <- function(x) all(sapply(x[-1], identical, x[1]))
2

Simple solution

The example in the OP doesn't require identical, it can be solved this way :

Compare all matrices to the first one and Reduce with & :

Reduce(`&`, lapply(d[-1], `==`, d[[1]]))
#      [,1] [,2] [,3]  [,4]
# [1,] TRUE TRUE TRUE FALSE
# [2,] TRUE TRUE TRUE  TRUE
# [3,] TRUE TRUE TRUE  TRUE

Using identical

However, identical and == behave differently in general, using identical we can do :

matrix(
  Reduce(`&`, lapply(d[-1], function(x) mapply(identical, x, d[[1]]))),
  nrow(d[[1]]))

#      [,1] [,2] [,3]  [,4]
# [1,] TRUE TRUE TRUE FALSE
# [2,] TRUE TRUE TRUE  TRUE
# [3,] TRUE TRUE TRUE  TRUE

How do they differ ? (examples)

f1 <- function(d) Reduce(`&`, lapply(d[-1], `==`, d[[1]]))
f2 <- function(d) matrix(Reduce(`&`, lapply(d[-1], function(x) mapply(identical, x, d[[1]]))),nrow(d[[1]]))

NA == NA is NA while identical(NA,NA) is TRUE, so the following give a different result for f1 and f2:

x_na <- x
x_na[3,1] <- NA
d_na <- list(x_na, y)

f1(d_na)
#      [,1] [,2] [,3]  [,4]
# [1,] TRUE TRUE TRUE FALSE
# [2,] TRUE TRUE TRUE  TRUE
# [3,]   NA TRUE TRUE  TRUE

f2(d_na)
#       [,1] [,2] [,3]  [,4]
# [1,]  TRUE TRUE TRUE FALSE
# [2,]  TRUE TRUE TRUE  TRUE
# [3,] FALSE TRUE TRUE  TRUE

== fails on lists while identical doesn't, so in the following f1 will crash :

x_list <- apply(x,c(1,2),list) # a matrix of list, similar to op's input but filled with length one lists
y_list <- apply(y,c(1,2),list)
z_list <- x_list            # we build a 3rd item
z_list[3,1] <- list("foo")  # # which differs from x2 on [3,1]
d_list <- list(x_list, y_list, z_list)

f1(d_list)
# Error in FUN(X[[i]], ...) : comparison of these types is not implemented

f2(d_list)
#       [,1] [,2] [,3]  [,4]
# [1,]  TRUE TRUE TRUE FALSE
# [2,]  TRUE TRUE TRUE  TRUE
# [3,] FALSE TRUE TRUE  TRUE
0

If you are only doing two it is better to just use the difference of the two.

x <-  matrix(c(3, 4, 5, 5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 5, 6, 2, 1), 3, 4)
y <-  matrix(c(3, 4, 5, 5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 5, 5, 2, 1), 3, 4)

which(rowSums(x - y) != 0)

if you read ?identical you will see that it only does two.


x <- matrix(c(3, 4, 5, 5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 5, 6, 2, 1), 3, 4)
y <- matrix(c(3, 4, 5, 5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 5, 5, 2, 1), 3, 4)
z <- matrix(c(3, 4, 5, 5, 3, 3, 5, 6, 5, 5, 2, 1), 3, 4)

d <- list(x, y, z)

With an arbitrary number of matrices we do not know where the baselines are, if we have more than three we can use the mode potentially.

library(modeest)

matrix_diff_locations <- function(l) {

  dimensions <- sapply(l, dim)
  dimensions <- apply(dimensions, 1, unique)

  stopifnot(length(dimensions) <= 2)

  baseline <- apply(matrix(unlist(l), ncol = length(l)), 1, mfv)
  baseline <- matrix(baseline, nrow = dimensions[1], ncol = dimensions[2])

  lapply(l, function(x) x - baseline)

}
matrix_diff_locations(d)

[[1]]
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    0    0    0    1
[2,]    0    0    0    0
[3,]    0    0    0    0

[[2]]
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    0    0    0    0
[2,]    0    0    0    0
[3,]    0    0    0    0

[[3]]
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    0    0    0    0
[2,]    0    0    0    0
[3,]    0   -1    0    0
  • Thank you so much for your answer. I do it for arbitrary number of element of the list. – Maryam Jul 15 '18 at 10:52
  • 1
    @Maryam you wont be able to tell which one is "correct" but which one is less common? identical does not handle more than single pair. – zacdav Jul 15 '18 at 10:53
  • Thanks a lot. I just knew that now. Thank you again. – Maryam Jul 15 '18 at 10:53
0

To compare any number of matrices, you could look at the variances.

apply(array(unlist(d), c(3, 4, length(d))), c(1, 2), 
      function(x) ifelse(var(x) == 0, TRUE, FALSE))

or as @zacdav in comments suggests just

apply(array(unlist(d), c(3, 4, length(d))), c(1, 2), 
      function(x) var(x) == 0)

Test:

> apply(array(unlist(d), c(3, 4, length(d))), c(1, 2), 
+       function(x) var(x) == 0)
      [,1]  [,2] [,3]  [,4]
[1,]  TRUE FALSE TRUE FALSE
[2,]  TRUE  TRUE TRUE  TRUE
[3,] FALSE  TRUE TRUE  TRUE

Additional data

z <- matrix(c(3,4,9,2,
       3,4,5,6,
       5,5,2,1), 3, 4)
d <- list(x, y, z)
  • this is much less efficient than straight up subtraction. – zacdav Jul 15 '18 at 11:06
  • @DavidArenburg I do not know how to answer my question myself. Hence, I asked. My try is what I think it is ok. However, I provide that It does not work. In addition, I mentioned that the number of my matrices is arbitrary. – Maryam Jul 15 '18 at 11:24
  • @Maryam So why did you accept an answer that doesn't meet your requirements – David Arenburg Jul 15 '18 at 11:25
  • 1
    to be honest I don't think either answer matches her requirements. – zacdav Jul 15 '18 at 11:27
  • 1
    @jaySf ifelse(var(x) == 0, TRUE, FALSE) could just be var(x) == 0 ? – zacdav Jul 15 '18 at 12:35
0

Treat the list as an array.
This method will tell you where and how large the differences are, also when the list contains more than two matrices.

x <- matrix(c(3, 4, 5, 5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 5, 6, 2, 1), 3, 4)
y <- matrix(c(3, 4, 5, 5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 5, 5, 2, 1), 3, 4)
z <- matrix(c(3, 4, 5, 5, 3, 3, 5, 6, 5, 5, 2, 1), 3, 4)
d <- list(x, y, z)

library(abind)

d.arr <- do.call(abind, c(d, list(along=3)))
aperm(apply(d.arr, 1:2, diff), c(2, 3, 1))
# , , 1

#      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
# [1,]    0    0    0   -1
# [2,]    0    0    0    0
# [3,]    0    0    0    0

# , , 2

#      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
# [1,]    0    0    0    0
# [2,]    0    0    0    0
# [3,]    0   -1    0    0

For a simple boolean identical collapsed into a matrix:

apply(d.arr, 1:2, function(x) all(diff(x) == 0))
#      [,1]  [,2] [,3]  [,4]
# [1,] TRUE  TRUE TRUE FALSE
# [2,] TRUE  TRUE TRUE  TRUE
# [3,] TRUE FALSE TRUE  TRUE

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