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I would like to know the benefits and drawbacks to using nested 'forall' loops. One thing I do understand is that 'forall' will invoke either the 'standalone' or 'leader' iterator, which may or may not induce additional parallelism, even across multiple locales. However, the amount of tasks that spawn are limited by default to 'here.maxTaskPar', and so we can only gain so much parallelism. If both 'forall' loops are over distributed data, I can see arguments in favor of using nested 'forall' statements, but what about when they are both local? When one of them is local and the other isn't?

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As you note, the short answer to this question is "it depends" since Chapel's forall loops invoke iterators that could have been written by anyone and therefore could do anything. But as you also allude to, for many of Chapel's standard types, there are certain knobs that govern the execution policies, as documented in Executing Chapel Programs::Controlling Degree of Data Parallelism, and certain conventions that are followed. The rest of my answer will be written with respect to such cases.

For a completely local nested forall loop in which all iterations do a similar amount of work, you should not see a huge difference between using a nested forall loop:

forall i in 1..m do
  forall j in 1..n do
    var twoPi = 2*pi;

and using a serial for loop for the inner loop:

forall i in 1..m do
  for j in 1..n do
    var twoPi = 2*pi;

The reason for this, as I think you're anticipating, is that the outer forall loop will create dataParTasksPerLocale tasks where this value defaults to here.numPUs() (the number of processing units, or cores, on the current locale, or compute node). Then, when each inner loop starts running, if dataParIgnoreRunningTasks is false, as it is by default, its iterator will note that dataParTasksPerLocale are already running, and so will avoid creating additional tasks. The result is that each inner loop will likely run all of its iterations serially since it assumes that all processor cores are already busy running tasks.

Now, imagine that the iterations of the outer loop are extremely load imbalanced such that some of the outer loop tasks will complete long before other ones. For example, here's a particularly artificial loop in which the second half of the iterations do much less work than the first half:

forall i in 1..m do
  if (i < m/2) then
    forall j in 1..n do
      var twoPi = 2*pi;

In this case, any task whose iterations are all in the range m/2+1..m will likely complete before those that own iterations in 1..m/2. Let's say that this applies to half the tasks (which is likely for loops over ranges like the above, where tasks tend to be assigned consecutive chunks of iterations). These tasks should complete quite rapidly. Once that happens, each of the inner loops executed by the other half of the tasks may see that fewer than dataParTasksPerLocale / 2 tasks are running and create additional tasks to execute their iterations. Why do I say "may"? Because if multiple outer loop tasks are running simultaneously, there will be multiple simultaneous inner loops, and each will each be querying the number of running tasks and competing to create dataParTasksPerLocale - here.runningTasks() additional ones, so some may execute their inner loops in parallel, others serially using a single task.

Of course, this "inner loops may be parallelized" behavior can occur even for more realistic nested loops than the above, such as one where the amount of work may vary dramatically across values of i and j:

forall i in 1..m do
  forall j in 1..n do
    computeForPoint(i,j);  // imagine the amount of work here varies significantly based on i and j

In any poorly-balanced loop, some outer-loop tasks may complete before others, freeing up tasks for subsequent inner loops to use. In cases like this, another option is to use a Dynamic Iterator for the outer loop to keep the work balanced better between outer loop tasks. Note that even in the most well-balanced loops, it's likely that not all outer-loop tasks will finish simultaneously, in which case the final inner loop instances may be executed in parallel (and this is why I used "likely" in the final sentence describing my initial well-balanced case).

In the local case, if I only want to make one loop of a loop nest parallel (and either could be), I typically make it the outer loop in order to minimize the number of tasks that are created and destroyed. That is, I'd typically choose:

forall i in 1..m do
  for j in 1..n do
    ...

over:

for i in 1..m do
  forall j in 1..n do
    ...

Because the former creates ~dataParTasksPerLocale tasks where the latter creates ~m * dataParTasksPerLocale. Alternatively, I might make both parallel and rely on the iterators and runtime to avoid creating excessive tasks:

forall i in 1..m do
  forall j in 1..n do
    ...

But in many cases, the "right" choice can also depend on the trip counts of the loops, the computation within the loop, etc. I.e., there's not necessarily a one-size-fits-all answer.

Now, moving to loops over distributed data structures: As of Chapel version 1.17, for standard array distributions, serial loops over those data structures are always computed on the current locale where the task encountering the loop is currently executing. By contrast, forall loops over distributed data structures create at least one task on each target locale, and potentially up to dataParTasksPerLocale per target locale based on the same heuristics as in the local case above. For this reason, loops over distributed data structures should typically use forall loops whenever possible to optimize for locality and improve the chances of creating scalable code.

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