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Consider I have a package.json file with following two packages

 {
     "dependencies": {
        "async": "^2.5.0",
        "moment": "latest"
     }
 }

When I run "npm install", a package-lock.json will be created with versions of async and moment fixed. And I expect that running "npm install" again will not change content of package-lock.json (reference), for both the packages. This is to ensure project builds with same packages in different environments in a different time. Let's say, I may use ^2.5.0 in my package.json, or some of my dependencies are using that way, but how can I ensure each time "npm install" will pick up same version in my dev machine and in the build server? As per my understanding package-lock.json ensures this (at-least this is true for dependencies specified in semver format). But it looks like this is not true for packages using "latest".

  • If latest version of moment changed from previous time you run npm install package-lock will be updated accordingly, what are you expecting? – A. Llorente Jul 16 '18 at 7:15
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    @A.Llorente Will this even jump a major version? Like from say 1.2.3 to 2.0.0? – Rajesh Jul 16 '18 at 7:19
  • My understanding is package-lock.json does not change with npm-install. This is to ensure your project built with same packages in different environments in a different time? Let's say, you may use ^1.2.3 in your package.json, or some of your dependencies are using that way, but how can u ensure each time npm install will pick up same version in your dev machine and in the build server? package-lock.json will ensure that. Correct me if I am wrong. – Lokesh Agrawal Jul 16 '18 at 7:23
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    You mean to say latest could be a problem and not the semver specified dependencies, correct? – Lokesh Agrawal Jul 16 '18 at 7:38
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    @Rajesh yes, it will jump major version also. If you don't want to jump major versions you need to use ^ for minor and ~ for patch. See docs.npmjs.com/getting-started/semantic-versioning – A. Llorente Jul 16 '18 at 9:12

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