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I was browsing through this file of code and then I found this class:

class StreamPlaylistEntry(BasePlaylistEntry):
def __init__(self, playlist, url, title, *, destination=None, **meta):
    super().__init__()

I know that an asterisk in front of a parameter means it's a list of an arbitrary number of arguments, but what does the asterisk by itself mean?

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1 Answer 1

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It means all arguments afterwards are keyword-only. As said in the official glossary under the word parameter:

  • keyword-only: specifies an argument that can be supplied only by keyword. Keyword-only parameters can be defined by including a single var-positional parameter or bare * in the parameter list of the function definition before them, for example kw_only1 and kw_only2 in the following:

     def func(arg, *, kw_only1, kw_only2): ...
    

This allows you to force the users of your code (which may include yourself) to be more explicit. Compare:

def f(x, y, allow_zero=True, some_other_flag=False, bonus=0): ...

f(2, 0, False, True, 100)  # valid
f(2, 0, allow_zero=False, some_other_flag=True, bonus=100)  # valid

with

def f(x, y, *, allow_zero=True, some_other_flag=False, bonus=0): ...

f(2, 0, False, True, 100)  # TypeError: f() takes 2 positional arguments but 5 were given
f(2, 0, allow_zero=False, some_other_flag=True, bonus=100)  # valid
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  • could you give some use cases for the keyword-only parameters?
    – tmo
    Nov 17, 2021 at 0:33
  • 1
    Note that with the first definition, both calls are equivalent. With the second definition, only the second call is valid; the first would produce a TypeError since there are too many positional arguments.
    – chepner
    Dec 14, 2023 at 15:27

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