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How do I go about computing a factorial of an integer in Python?

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201

Easiest way is to use math.factorial (available in Python 2.6 and above):

import math
math.factorial(1000)

If you want/have to write it yourself, you can use an iterative approach:

def factorial(n):
    fact = 1
    for num in range(2, n + 1):
        fact *= num
    return fact

or a recursive approach:

def factorial(n):
    if n < 2:
        return 1
    else:
        return n * factorial(n-1)

Note that the factorial function is only defined for positive integers so you should also check that n >= 0 and that isinstance(n, int). If it's not, raise a ValueError or a TypeError respectively. math.factorial will take care of this for you.

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  • 2
    I'm not understanding how you can use factorial within the factorial function. How can you use the same function within the function you're currently defining? I'm new to Python so I'm just trying to understand. – J82 Nov 7 '14 at 2:32
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    @J82: The concept used here is called recursion ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recursion_(computer_science) ) - a function calling itself is perfectly fine and often useful. – schnaader Nov 7 '14 at 10:06
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    The recursive function will raise a RecursionError for any number larger than 998 (try factorial(999)) unless you increase Python's recursion limit – Boris Dec 15 '19 at 19:15
115

On Python 2.6 and up, try:

import math
math.factorial(n)
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  • Starting with Python 3.9, passing a float to this function will raise a DeprecationWarning. If you want to do that, you need to convert n to an int explicitly: math.factorial(int(n)), which will discard anything after the decimal, so you might want to check that n.is_integer() – Boris Nov 22 '19 at 11:47
18

Existing solution

The shortest and probably the fastest solution is:

from math import factorial
print factorial(1000)

Building your own

You can also build your own solution. Generally you have two approaches. The one that suits me best is:

from itertools import imap
def factorial(x):
    return reduce(long.__mul__, imap(long, xrange(1, x + 1)))

print factorial(1000)

(it works also for bigger numbers, when the result becomes long)

The second way of achieving the same is:

def factorial(x):
    result = 1
    for i in xrange(2, x + 1):
        result *= i
    return result

print factorial(1000)
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7
def factorial(n):
    if n < 2:
        return 1
    return n * factorial(n - 1)
1
5

If you are using Python2.5 or older try

from operator import mul
def factorial(n):
    return reduce(mul, range(1,n+1))

for newer Python, there is factorial in the math module as given in other answers here

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  • 1
    This is a Python 2-only answer, reduce was removed from Python 3. – Boris Nov 22 '19 at 11:37
  • @Boris, in Python3 you just need to add from functools import reduce – John La Rooy Nov 24 '19 at 22:55
  • It was removed for a reason, you shouldn't use it artima.com/weblogs/viewpost.jsp?thread=98196 – Boris Nov 24 '19 at 23:43
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def fact(n):
    f = 1
    for i in range(1, n + 1):
        f *= i
    return f
3

For performance reasons, please do not use recursion. It would be disastrous.

def fact(n, total=1):
    while True:
        if n == 1:
            return total
        n, total = n - 1, total * n

Check running results

cProfile.run('fact(126000)')

4 function calls in 5.164 seconds

Using the stack is convenient(like recursive call), but it comes at a cost: storing detailed information can take up a lot of memory.

If the stack is high, it means that the computer stores a lot of information about function calls.

The method only takes up constant memory(like iteration).

Or Using for loop

def fact(n):
    result = 1
    for i in range(2, n + 1):
        result *= i
    return result

Check running results

cProfile.run('fact(126000)')

4 function calls in 4.708 seconds

Or Using builtin function math

def fact(n):
    return math.factorial(n)

Check running results

cProfile.run('fact(126000)')

5 function calls in 0.272 seconds
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  • 1
    I think this while loop looks a little bit cleaner <!-- language: python --> def fact(n): ret = 1 while n > 1: n, ret = n - 1, ret * n return ret – edilio May 18 '18 at 15:13
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Another way to do it is to use np.prod shown below:

def factorial(n):
    if n == 0:
        return 1
    else:
         return np.prod(np.arange(1,n+1))
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Non-recursive solution, no imports:

def factorial(x):
    return eval(' * '.join(map(str, range(1, x + 1))))

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