114

How do I go about computing a factorial of an integer in Python?

16 Answers 16

165

Easiest way: math.factorial(x) (available in 2.6 and above).

If you want/have to write it yourself, use something like

def factorial(n):return reduce(lambda x,y:x*y,[1]+range(1,n+1))

or something more readable:

def factorial(n):
    if n == 0:
        return 1
    else:
        return n * factorial(n-1)

As always, Google is your friend ;)

  • 65
    This has to be the least readable factorial implementation I've ever seen. – user395760 Feb 27 '11 at 22:27
  • 2
    I'm not understanding how you can use factorial within the factorial function. How can you use the same function within the function you're currently defining? I'm new to Python so I'm just trying to understand. – J82 Nov 7 '14 at 2:32
  • 8
    @J82: The concept used here is called recursion ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recursion_(computer_science) ) - a function calling itself is perfectly fine and often useful. – schnaader Nov 7 '14 at 10:06
  • 2
    def fact(n): return reduce(lambda x, y: x*y, range(1, n+1), 1) – Chi Zhang Jan 23 '15 at 7:10
  • 2
    For a recursive factorial, consider factorial = (lambda ǀ:ǀ(ǀ))(lambda ǀ:lambda ǃ:ǃ and ǃ*ǀ(ǀ)(~-ǃ)or-~ǃ) (Needs Python 3; won't work with Python 2. Who says that obfuscated Python isn't a thing?) – Mark Dickinson May 18 '18 at 19:25
107

On Python 2.6 and up, try:

import math
math.factorial(n)
23

Not really necessary since this is such an old thread. But I did here is another way to compute the factorial of an integer using a while loop.

def factorial(n):
    num = 1
    while n >= 1:
        num = num * n
        n = n - 1
    return num
  • 3
    factorial(-1) will return 1, should raise ValueError or something. – f.rodrigues Jun 17 '15 at 18:43
19

Existing solution

The shortest and probably the fastest solution is:

from math import factorial
print factorial(1000)

Building your own

You can also build your own solution. Generally you have two approaches. The one that suits me best is:

from itertools import imap
def factorial(x):
    return reduce(long.__mul__, imap(long, xrange(1, x + 1)))

print factorial(1000)

(it works also for bigger numbers, when the result becomes long)

The second way of achieving the same is:

def factorial(x):
    result = 1
    for i in xrange(2, x + 1):
        result *= i
    return result

print factorial(1000)
  • +1 for selfmade efficient non-recursive functions – Michael Jan 10 '13 at 6:29
  • A tiny improvement: you can start xrange at 2. – Dennis Nov 20 '13 at 0:20
  • @Dennis: Agreed, but only when it comes to the second version in Building your own part. If you would do the same in the first version, you would get "TypeError: reduce() of empty sequence with no initial value" without making bigger changes. – Tadeck Nov 20 '13 at 7:06
  • @Tadeck thanks for pointing that out. I was only looking at the 2nd version when I made that comment, should have been more clear :). – Dennis Nov 20 '13 at 20:15
7
def factorial(n):
    if n < 2:
        return 1
    return n * factorial(n - 1)
6

If you are using Python2.5 or older try

from operator import mul
def factorial(n):
    return reduce(mul, range(1,n+1))

for newer Python, there is factorial in the math module as given in other answers here

  • Underrated answer. After the native one, this seems like the nicest solution. – Hunan Rostomyan Aug 4 '16 at 20:00
4

Just another method for computing the factorial using a for-loop -

def factorial(n):
    base = 1
    for i in range(n,0,-1):
        base = base * i
    print base
  • 2
    Your last line should be print(base). – OGC Mar 7 '18 at 13:59
3

http://www.google.com/search?aq=0&oq=factorial+py&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=factorial+python

import math
math.factorial( yourInt )
3

For performance reasons, please do not use recursion. It would be disastrous.

def fact(n, total=1):
    while True:
        if n == 1:
            return total
        n, total = n - 1, total * n

Check running results

cProfile.run('fact(126000)')

4 function calls in 5.164 seconds

Using the stack is convenient(like recursive call), but it comes at a cost: storing detailed information can take up a lot of memory.

If the stack is high, it means that the computer stores a lot of information about function calls.

The method only takes up constant memory(like iteration).

Or Using for loop

def fact(n):
    result = 1
    for i in range(2, n + 1):
        result *= i
    return result

Check running results

cProfile.run('fact(126000)')

4 function calls in 4.708 seconds

Or Using builtin function math

def fact(n):
    return math.factorial(n)

Check running results

cProfile.run('fact(126000)')

5 function calls in 0.272 seconds
  • 1
    Explain your reasoning. – unseen_rider Mar 31 '18 at 20:55
  • 1
    I think this while loop looks a little bit cleaner <!-- language: python --> def fact(n): ret = 1 while n > 1: n, ret = n - 1, ret * n return ret – edilio May 18 '18 at 15:13
2

You mean:

def fact(n):
  f = 1
  for i in range(1, n +1):
   f *= i
  return f

2

Here is my try

>>> import math
>>> def factorial_verbose(number):
...     for i in range(number):
...             yield f'{i + 1} x '
...
>>> res = ''.join([x for x in factorial_verbose(5)])
>>> res = ' '.join([res[:len(res)-3], '=', str(math.factorial(5))])
>>> res
'1 x 2 x 3 x 4 x 5 = 120'
  • @Nir Levy, what a fun little thing – Pedro Rodrigues Dec 13 '18 at 0:42
1
def factorial(n):
    result = 1
    i = n * (n -1)
    while n >= 1:
        result = result * n
        n = n - 1
    return result

print (factorial(10)) #prints 3628800
1

I know this has been answered but here is another method with a reverse range list comprehension, making the range easier to read and more compact:

    #   1. Ensure input number is an integer by attempting to cast value to int
    #       1a. To accomplish, we attempt to cast the input value to int() type and catch the TypeError/ValueError 
    #           if the conversion cannot happen because the value type is incorrect
    #   2. Create a list of all numbers from n to 1 to then be multiplied against each other 
    #       using list comprehension and range loop in reverse order from highest number to smallest.
    #   3. Use reduce to walk the list of integers and multiply each against the next.
    #       3a. Here, reduce will call the registered lambda function for each element in the list.
    #           Reduce will execute lambda for the first 2 elements in the list, then the product is
    #           multiplied by the next element in the list, and so-on, until the list ends.

    try :
        num = int( num )
        return reduce( lambda x, y: x * y, [n for n in range(num, 0, -1)] )

    except ( TypeError, ValueError ) :
        raise InvalidInputException ( "Input must be an integer, greater than 0!" )

You can see a full version of the code within this gist: https://gist.github.com/sadmicrowave/d4fbefc124eb69027d7a3131526e8c06

1

One line, fast and large numbers also works:

#use python3.6.x for f-string
fact = lambda x: globals()["x"] if exec(f'x=1\nfor i in range(1, {x+1}):\n\tx*=i', globals()) is None else None
0

A lot of these methods are very good but I would say your best bet is always to use the built in function. However there are some very easily creatable ones by yourself if you want to see what is going on. A quick one I came up with is much the same as many of them here.

def factorial(n):
    x = 1
    li = list(range(1, n + 1))
    for each in li:
        x = x * each
    print(x)

This is a rather efficient code, the advantage being that a list is created if you wan't to manipulate some data from the list although im not to sure why you would really.


Edit: Only just saw that I posted this on an old thing. Sorry.

  • Since python version is not specified in question, this answer can be improved - xrange for python 2, and range for python 3 - since one person could take range in python 2 which would be inefficient – unseen_rider Mar 31 '18 at 20:41
0

Another way to do it is to use np.prod shown below:

def factorial(n):
    if n == 0:
        return 1
    else:
         return np.prod(np.arange(1,n+1))

protected by ayhan Jan 18 '18 at 22:36

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