0

I've a simple go code, that uses the runtime package as follows:

package main

import (
    "runtime"
    "fmt"
)

func bar() {
    pc := make([]uintptr, 1000)
    n := runtime.Callers(0, pc)
    frames := runtime.CallersFrames(pc[:n])
    for {
        frame, more := frames.Next()
        if ! more {
            break
        }
        fmt.Printf("FILE = %s and FUNC = %s\n", frame.File, frame.Function)
    }
}

func foo() {
    bar()
}

func main() {
    foo()
}

I've Go binary installed in a custom location (/home/userA/bin/go) on a Ubuntu machine (say machine A)

I've compiled it on machine A and ran the executable on the same machine to get the output:

FILE = /home/userA/bin/go/src/runtime/extern.go and FUNC = runtime.Callers
FILE = /home/userA/src/main.go and FUNC = main.bar
FILE = /home/userA/src/main.go and FUNC = main.foo
FILE = /home/userA/src/main.go and FUNC = main.main
FILE = /home/userA/bin/go/src/runtime/proc.go and FUNC = runtime.main

Now I copied the compiled executable to another Ubuntu machine (say machine B) where Go binary was installed in another different custom location (/home/userB/bin/go). I ran the executable from /home/userB. But this time also, I got the same output as before:

FILE = /home/userA/bin/go/src/runtime/extern.go and FUNC = runtime.Callers
FILE = /home/userA/src/main.go and FUNC = main.bar
FILE = /home/userA/src/main.go and FUNC = main.foo
FILE = /home/userA/src/main.go and FUNC = main.main
FILE = /home/userA/bin/go/src/runtime/proc.go and FUNC = runtime.main

It seems that the runtime package sets the stack-frames during compilation time.

I need to do some processing on the file paths based on GOPATH environment variable, which I've set as /home/userA on machine A and as /home/userB on machine B.

I need to strip the GOPATH part from each of those file paths. I'm doing it with this simple function call: strings.Replace(frame.File, GOPATH, "", 1)

But, because of this behaviour of the runtime package, the strings.Replace function fails to replace the initial portion of the file paths on machine B.

Any idea on how to accomplish this on machine B ?

UPDATE

Following the suggestion from @JimB, I've built the project with

CGO_ENABLED=0 go build -a -ldflags="-w -s" -gcflags=-trimpath=/home/userA -asmflags=-trimpath=/home/userA

Now, running the executable on the same machine gives output as:

FILE = /home/userA/bin/go/src/runtime/extern.go and FUNC = runtime.Callers
FILE = /home/userA/src/vendor/github.com/kataras/golog/golog.go and FUNC = vendor/github.com/kataras/golog.Error
FILE = /home/userA/src/test/test_logger.go and FUNC = test/test_logger.TestLogger
FILE = src/main.go and FUNC = main.bar
FILE = src/main.go and FUNC = main.foo
FILE = src/main.go and FUNC = main.main
FILE = /home/userA/bin/go/src/runtime/proc.go and FUNC = runtime.main

The path prefix is trimmed only for the main file. It's still there for any vendor imported package or any locally imported package.

  • Are you just trying to manually implement this? stackoverflow.com/questions/45279385/… – JimB Jul 16 '18 at 21:55
  • You probably want runtime.GOROOT – Michael Hampton Jul 16 '18 at 22:43
  • @MichaelHampton, using runtime.GOROOT doesn't solve my problem. Actually I'll compile the code on machine A, where golang will be installed in some custom location as /home/userA, but I'll run the executable on some machine where go will be installed in its standard location like /usr/bin. So, using GOROOT, I won't be able to replace the prefix successfully. – dibyendu Jul 17 '18 at 3:53
  • @JimB your solution works but only for a single file, not for any imported packages (both from my project and from any 3rd party vendor). I've updated the post with the situation. – dibyendu Jul 17 '18 at 4:54
0

What are you tring to accomplish? The XY problem is asking about your attempted solution rather than your actual problem: The XY Problem.


Command go

The GOPATH environment variable lists places to look for Go code. On Unix, the value is a colon-separated string. On Windows, the value is a semicolon-separated string. On Plan 9, the value is a list.


GOPATH is an artifact of the Go tools. It is not covered by the Go language compatibility guarantees.

What should happen if the GOPATH list has more than one element?


Does this work for you?

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "runtime"
    "strings"
)

func srcFile(path string) string {
    const src = `/src/`
    i := strings.LastIndex(path, src)
    if i >= 0 {
        path = path[i+len(src):]
    }
    return path
}

func bar() {
    pc := make([]uintptr, 1000)
    n := runtime.Callers(0, pc)
    frames := runtime.CallersFrames(pc[:n])
    for {
        frame, more := frames.Next()
        if !more {
            break
        }
        fmt.Printf("PATH = %s and FUNC = %s\n", frame.File, frame.Function)
        fmt.Printf("FILE = %s and FUNC = %s\n", srcFile(frame.File), frame.Function)
    }
}

func foo() {
    bar()
}

func main() {
    foo()
}

Output:

PATH = /home/peter/go/src/runtime/extern.go and FUNC = runtime.Callers
FILE = runtime/extern.go and FUNC = runtime.Callers
PATH = /home/peter/gopath/src/so/gopath.go and FUNC = main.bar
FILE = so/gopath.go and FUNC = main.bar
PATH = /home/peter/gopath/src/so/gopath.go and FUNC = main.foo
FILE = so/gopath.go and FUNC = main.foo
PATH = /home/peter/gopath/src/so/gopath.go and FUNC = main.main
FILE = so/gopath.go and FUNC = main.main
PATH = /home/peter/go/src/runtime/proc.go and FUNC = runtime.main
FILE = runtime/proc.go and FUNC = runtime.main

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