4

For my example,having car object and found that min and max price value based on model (group by).

List<Car> carsDetails = UserDB.getCarsDetails();
Map<String, DoubleSummaryStatistics> collect4 = carsDetails.stream()
                .collect(Collectors.groupingBy(Car::getMake, Collectors.summarizingDouble(Car::getPrice)));
collect4.entrySet().forEach(e->System.out.println(e.getKey()+" "+e.getValue().getMax()+" "+e.getValue().getMin()));

output :
Lexus 94837.79 17569.59
Subaru 96583.25 8498.41
Chevrolet 99892.59 6861.85

But i couldn't find which car object have max and min price. How can i do that?

  • But i couldn't find which car object have max and min price -> Do you mean with that the biggest price difference? – Lino Jul 17 '18 at 9:32
  • so you have a list of cars and you want to find the max and min of those cars based on price? – Eugene Jul 17 '18 at 9:35
  • 2
    don't use DoubleSummaryStatistics to only get min and max. – Aomine Jul 17 '18 at 9:40
  • @Eugene. Yes . you are right..based on model to find max and min of those cars – Learn Hadoop Jul 17 '18 at 10:05
7

If you were interested in only one Car per group, you could use, e.g.

Map<String, Car> mostExpensives = carsDetails.stream()
    .collect(Collectors.toMap(Car::getMake, Function.identity(),
        BinaryOperator.maxBy(Comparator.comparing(Car::getPrice))));
mostExpensives.forEach((make,car) -> System.out.println(make+" "+car));

But since you want the most expensive and the cheapest, you need something like this:

Map<String, List<Car>> mostExpensivesAndCheapest = carsDetails.stream()
    .collect(Collectors.toMap(Car::getMake, car -> Arrays.asList(car, car),
        (l1,l2) -> Arrays.asList(
            (l1.get(0).getPrice()>l2.get(0).getPrice()? l2: l1).get(0),
            (l1.get(1).getPrice()<l2.get(1).getPrice()? l2: l1).get(1))));
mostExpensivesAndCheapest.forEach((make,cars) -> System.out.println(make
        +" cheapest: "+cars.get(0)+" most expensive: "+cars.get(1)));

This solution bears a bit of inconvenience due to the fact that there is no generic statistics object equivalent to DoubleSummaryStatistics. If this happens more than once, it’s worth filling the gap with a class like this:

/**
 * Like {@code DoubleSummaryStatistics}, {@code IntSummaryStatistics}, and
 * {@code LongSummaryStatistics}, but for an arbitrary type {@code T}.
 */
public class SummaryStatistics<T> implements Consumer<T> {
    /**
     * Collect to a {@code SummaryStatistics} for natural order.
     */
    public static <T extends Comparable<? super T>> Collector<T,?,SummaryStatistics<T>>
                  statistics() {
        return statistics(Comparator.<T>naturalOrder());
    }
    /**
     * Collect to a {@code SummaryStatistics} using the specified comparator.
     */
    public static <T> Collector<T,?,SummaryStatistics<T>>
                  statistics(Comparator<T> comparator) {
        Objects.requireNonNull(comparator);
        return Collector.of(() -> new SummaryStatistics<>(comparator),
            SummaryStatistics::accept, SummaryStatistics::merge);
    }
    private final Comparator<T> c;
    private T min, max;
    private long count;
    public SummaryStatistics(Comparator<T> comparator) {
        c = Objects.requireNonNull(comparator);
    }

    public void accept(T t) {
        if(count == 0) {
            count = 1;
            min = t;
            max = t;
        }
        else {
            if(c.compare(min, t) > 0) min = t;
            if(c.compare(max, t) < 0) max = t;
            count++;
        }
    }
    public SummaryStatistics<T> merge(SummaryStatistics<T> s) {
        if(s.count > 0) {
            if(count == 0) {
                count = s.count;
                min = s.min;
                max = s.max;
            }
            else {
                if(c.compare(min, s.min) > 0) min = s.min;
                if(c.compare(max, s.max) < 0) max = s.max;
                count += s.count;
            }
        }
        return this;
    }

    public long getCount() {
        return count;
    }

    public T getMin() {
        return min;
    }

    public T getMax() {
        return max;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return count == 0? "empty": (count+" elements between "+min+" and "+max);
    }
}

After adding this to your code base, you may use it like

Map<String, SummaryStatistics<Car>> mostExpensives = carsDetails.stream()
    .collect(Collectors.groupingBy(Car::getMake,
        SummaryStatistics.statistics(Comparator.comparing(Car::getPrice))));
mostExpensives.forEach((make,cars) -> System.out.println(make+": "+cars));

If getPrice returns double, it may be more efficient to use Comparator.comparingDouble(Car::getPrice) instead of Comparator.comparing(Car::getPrice).

  • 1
    might be a bit cheery picky.. --> Comparator.comparingDouble(...) instead of Comparator.comparing(..). I first learned this from Holger :) – Aomine Jul 17 '18 at 9:47
  • 1
    @Aominè that’s what I would use when I know for sure that getPrice returns double instead of Double. – Holger Jul 17 '18 at 9:59
  • 1
    @LearnHadoop well, as said, the logic is supposed to be similar to the numerical statistics objects like, e.g. DoubleSummaryStatistics, so you can find some hints in their documentation. Not being numeric, we don’t have sum nor average, so it only maintains min, max, and count. Basically, the collector will call accept for every element resp. for every element of a group when combining with groupingBy. Only with parallel evaluation, it may call the merge method to combine partial results. – Holger Jul 17 '18 at 10:26
  • 1
    @RavindraRanwala that’s already given in the question. The question is about what this approach does not provide. – Holger Jul 17 '18 at 10:27
  • 1
    @TomaszLinkowski the List based solution is mainly for the “can I do this without creating a new class” fraction… – Holger Jul 17 '18 at 13:58
1

I would like to propose a solution that (in my opinion) strives for greatest readability (which reduces e.g. the maintenance burden of such code).

It's Collector-based so - as a bonus - it can be used with a parallel Stream. It assumes the objects are non-null.

final class MinMaxFinder<T> {

    private final Comparator<T> comparator;

    MinMaxFinder(Comparator<T> comparator) {
        this.comparator = comparator;
    }

    Collector<T, ?, MinMaxResult<T>> collector() {
        return Collector.of(
                MinMaxAccumulator::new,
                MinMaxAccumulator::add,
                MinMaxAccumulator::combine,
                MinMaxAccumulator::toResult
        );
    }

    private class MinMaxAccumulator {
        T min = null;
        T max = null;

        MinMaxAccumulator() {
        }

        private boolean isEmpty() {
            return min == null;
        }

        void add(T item) {
            if (isEmpty()) {
                min = max = item;
            } else {
                updateMin(item);
                updateMax(item);
            }
        }

        MinMaxAccumulator combine(MinMaxAccumulator otherAcc) {
            if (isEmpty()) {
                return otherAcc;
            }
            if (!otherAcc.isEmpty()) {
                updateMin(otherAcc.min);
                updateMax(otherAcc.max);
            }
            return this;
        }

        private void updateMin(T item) {
            min = BinaryOperator.minBy(comparator).apply(min, item);
        }

        private void updateMax(T item) {
            max = BinaryOperator.maxBy(comparator).apply(max, item);
        }

        MinMaxResult<T> toResult() {
            return new MinMaxResult<>(min, max);
        }
    }
}

The result-holder value-like class:

public class MinMaxResult<T> {
    private final T min;
    private final T max;

    public MinMaxResult(T min, T max) {
        this.min = min;
        this.max = max;
    }

    public T min() {
        return min;
    }

    public T max() {
        return max;
    }
}

Usage:

MinMaxFinder<Car> minMaxFinder = new MinMaxFinder<>(Comparator.comparing(Car::getPrice));
Map<String, MinMaxResult<Car>> minMaxResultMap = carsDetails.stream()
            .collect(Collectors.groupingBy(Car::getMake, minMaxFinder.collector()));
  • 2
    That’s close to my SummaryStatistics approach, though I don’t copy the result into an immutable type afterwards. Note that it is possible to support ordering for such a collector, i.e. to guaranty that in case of a tie, the first encountered min/max element is kept. – Holger Jul 17 '18 at 10:32
  • 2
    But keep in mind that when you support arbitrary Comparators, it might be a nullsFirst variant, so min == null is not a sufficient criteria to assume that the MinMaxAccumulator is empty. – Holger Jul 17 '18 at 10:40
  • @Holger Thanks for your comments! Indeed, it's very close to your SummaryStatistics (I didn't notice the edit when I started to write the answer, though). The remark about the ordering is very good - I updated the answer to reflect that (note, however, that ordering will be preserved only during a sequential collection). As to nullability, I pointed out that this solution supports only non-null elements, but I think your approach (with counting the elements) is indeed much better. – Tomasz Linkowski Jul 17 '18 at 11:53
  • 2
    Yes, I assumed that writing the answer took some time and overlapped with my edit. Regarding the comparator, I could add a getter for the comparator as well, as someone might be interested in the comparator used for determining min and max. Maintaining the order works even for parallel processing as long as the combiner prefers the left argument in case of a tie, as for ordered streams, the implementation will care to invoke it with the proper arguments (that’s why toList() or joining(…) work with parallel streams too. – Holger Jul 17 '18 at 13:29
  • 2
    No, no, both, minBy and maxBy, return the left argument when both arguments are equal, hence, you should keep the value = function.apply(value, newItem) pattern, as for both, the previously encountered value should be preferred. The only issue is, that while minBy and maxBy exhibit this behavior (and everything speaks for assuming it to be intended behavior), the documentation doesn’t say so explicitly, so some developers feel uncomfortable with code relying on this behavior. So your original code was already capable of maintaining the order, you only have to remove the UNORDERED. – Holger Jul 17 '18 at 14:07

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