45

In the code below why is b[9] uninitialized instead of out-of-bounds?

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    char b[] = {'N', 'i', 'c', 'e', ' ', 'y', 'o', 'u', '!'};
    printf("b[9] = %d\n", b[9]);

    return 0;
}

Compiler call:

% gcc -O2 -W -Wall -pedantic -c foo.c
foo.c: In function ‘main’:
foo.c:6:5: warning: ‘b[9]’ is used uninitialized in this function [-Wuninitialized]
     printf("b[9] = %d\n", b[9]);
% gcc --version
gcc (Ubuntu 5.4.0-6ubuntu1~16.04.6) 5.4.0 20160609
Copyright (C) 2015 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

Update: Now this is odd:

#include <stdio.h>

void foo(char *);

int main(void)
{
    char b[] = {'N', 'i', 'c', 'e', ' ', 'y', 'o', 'u', '!'};
    foo(&b[9]);
    foo(&b[10]);
    printf("b[9] = %d\n", b[9]);
    printf("b[10] = %d\n", b[10]);

    return 0;
}

Compiling this results in the warnings one would expect:

% gcc -O2 -W -Wall -pedantic -c foo.c
foo.c: In function ‘main’:
foo.c:9:5: warning: array subscript is above array bounds [-Warray-bounds]
     foo(&b[10]);
     ^
foo.c:10:29: warning: array subscript is above array bounds [-Warray-bounds]
     printf("b[9] = %d\n", b[9]);
                             ^
foo.c:11:29: warning: array subscript is above array bounds [-Warray-bounds]
     printf("b[10] = %d\n", b[10]);

Suddenly gcc sees the out-of-bounds for what it is.

7
  • Interestingly clang gets it right. Commented Jul 17, 2018 at 12:45
  • 6
    Try printf("b[10] = %d\n", b[10]); 9 is one past the end of the array, and is an allowable address (although it's still undefined to actually dereference it...). Commented Jul 17, 2018 at 12:50
  • @AndrewHenle But b[9] is a dereference, &b[9] would be valid. Some more oddness added to the question. Commented Jul 17, 2018 at 13:02
  • 2
    One past the end of the array may be treated differently - and in your first case, not quite correctly. See the paragraphs on pointer arithmetic in the C standard: https://port70.net/~nsz/c/c11/n1570.html#6.5.6p8 Commented Jul 17, 2018 at 13:08
  • 5
    The different warnings are probably from different gcc versions. The behaviours of both your samples are undefined by the standards, so compilers are not actually required to do anything in particular with them - warnings are not required. The problem for a compiler-developer is that undefined behaviour can manifest in an unlimited number of ways. It is therefore difficult for a compiler to quickly (in the sense of programmers not whinging that it takes too long to compile) work out which warning is "best".
    – Peter
    Commented Jul 17, 2018 at 13:34

4 Answers 4

57

I believe this could be the case here: in the first code, GCC notices that you don't need the entire char array at all, just b[9], so it can replace the code with

char b_9; // = ???
printf("b[9] = %d\n", b_9);

Now, this is a completely legal transform, because as the array was accessed out of bounds, the behaviour is completely undefined. Only in latter phase does it then notice that this variable, which is a substitute for b[9], is uninitialized, and issues the diagnostics message.

Why I believe this? Because if I add just any code that will reference the array's address in memory, for example printf("%p\n", &b[8]); anywhere, the array now is fully realized in memory, and compiler will diagnose array subscript is above array bounds.


What I find even more interesting is that GCC does not diagnose out-of-bounds access at all unless optimizations are enabled. This would again suggest that whenever you're writing a program new program you should compile it with optimizations enabled to make the bugs highly visible instead of keeping them hidden with debug mode ;)

1
  • I agree. gcc -O0 code is slow, unreadable, skips a lot of warnings and has little relevance to anything you want to ship. You should always use -Os or -O2. Commented Aug 6, 2018 at 16:14
16

The behaviour on reading b[9] or b[10] is undefined.

Your compiler is issuing a warning (it doesn't have to), although the warning text is a little misleading, but not technically incorrect. In my opinion, it's rather clever. (A C compiler is not required to issue a diagnostic for out of bounds access.)

Regarding &b[9], the compiler is not allowed to dereference that, and must evaluate it as b + 9. You are allowed to set a pointer one past the end of an array. The behaviour of setting a pointer to &b[10] is undefined.

6
  • 2
    Obviously. The question is specifically about the warning gcc shows. Not about the behavior or validity of the code. Gcc does now about out-of-bounds errors and the question is why it doesn't use it here. See the update for more strangeness. Commented Jul 17, 2018 at 13:05
  • 2
    @GoswinvonBrederlow: The gcc warning is correct. b[9] is uninitialised.
    – Bathsheba
    Commented Jul 17, 2018 at 13:06
  • It's really not uninitialised. It's out-of-bounds. dereferencing it is plain wrong. Commented Jul 17, 2018 at 13:08
  • 1
    @GoswinvonBrederlow: We can agree to disagree on that point. Your question is now more interesting now you've added &b[9] &c.
    – Bathsheba
    Commented Jul 17, 2018 at 13:09
  • 1
    True b[9] is uninitialized. It is also outside the b[] array. I tried to "initialize" b[9] and still have only 9 elements. Result supports "warning text is a little misleading, but not technically incorrect." Commented Jul 17, 2018 at 14:42
1

Some additional experimental results.


Using char b[9] instead of char b[] appears to make no difference, gcc still warns the same with char b[9].

Interestingly, initializing the one-passed element via the "next" member in a struct 1) does quiet the "uninitialized" warning and 2) does not warn about accessioning outside the array.

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct {
  char c[9];
  char d[9];
} TwoNines;

int main(void) {
  char b[9] = { 'N', 'i', 'c', 'e', ' ', 'y', 'o', 'u', '!' };
  printf("b[] size %zu\n", sizeof b);
  printf("b[9] = %d\n", b[9]);   // 'b[9]' is used uninitialized in this function [-Wuninitialized]

  TwoNines e = { { 'N', 'i', 'c', 'e', ' ', 'y', 'o', 'u', '!' }, //
                 { 'N', 'i', 'c', 'e', ' ', 'y', 'o', 'u', '!' } };

  printf("e size %zu\n", sizeof e);
  printf("e.c[9] = %d\n", e.c[9]);   // No warning.

  return 0;
}

Output

b[] size 9
b[9] = 0
e size 18    // With 18, we know `e` is packed.
e.c[9] = 78  // 'N'

Notes:
gcc -std=c11 -O3 -g3 -pedantic -Wall -Wextra -Wconversion -c -fmessage-length=0 -v -MMD -MP ...
gcc/gcc-7.3.0-2.i686

1
  • Re accessing the "next" member: That is legal because: 1. A pointer to the first member is equivalent to a pointer to the whole struct, 2. Any object can be safely cast to char array and dereferenced to inspect the byte representation, 3. e.c coincidentally happens to be a char array, so 4. You are type punning the whole struct into an array of char.
    – Kevin
    Commented Jul 18, 2018 at 4:46
-2

When you compile the code with -O2 the triviality of the example makes this variable optimized out. So the warning is 100% correct

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