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I created a stored procedure using create procedure sp_test()...

The sp was successfully created. Then I get error saying "Access denied for user 'xxx'@'%' to database 'DB'" when running call sp_test()

Below is my priviledges:

GRANT SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, CREATE, DROP, REFERENCES, INDEX, ALTER, EXECUTE, CREATE VIEW, SHOW VIEW, CREATE ROUTINE, ALTER ROUTINE, EVENT, TRIGGER ON `%`.* TO 'xxx'@'%'

I tried create DEFINER = 'root'@'%' procedure sp_test() as suggested in a SO question but hit an error saying "Access denied; you need (at least one of) the SUPER privilege(s) for this operation"

What extra privilege do I need? And what is the sql statement to grant the privilege to user xxx? I am using MySQL 5.6.10 (RDS) on Amazon Web Service

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You need the EXECUTE privilege to run the CALL statement to run a procedure.

https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/create-procedure.html says:

CREATE PROCEDURE and CREATE FUNCTION require the CREATE ROUTINE privilege. They might also require the SUPER privilege, depending on the DEFINER value...

In other words, you need SUPER privilege only if you want to specify the DEFINER to some other user than yourself as you create the procedure.

In Amazon RDS, your MySQL user cannot have SUPER privilege. That's their policy. You can't GRANT SUPER to any user you can use.

Therefore you can't set DEFINER for procedures, functions, triggers, or views. If you have to restore a database that includes the DEFINER clause, you have to edit them out first.

See also:

So you can't rely on the DEFINER of a procedure to give your session access to tables you don't normally have privileges to. That feature of MySQL is not available when you use RDS. Your MySQL user must have direct privileges to access any tables the procedure accesses. If you don't, you'll get an error.

If you need that feature, you'll have to give up using RDS, and instead run MySQL Server yourself on an EC2 instance.

  • Not exactly... If you log in as the User A who you want to be the definer, you can create the procedure with SQL SECURITY DEFINER and then, if the User B has the EXECUTE privilege, User B can call the procedure which will run in the security context of User A. Account locking can then be used to prevent anyone authenticating as User A. I'm going through this same process now. – Sam_Butler Oct 20 at 10:18

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