33

See the below example of returning an optional of UserName - a movable/copyable class.

std::optional<UserName> CreateUser()
{
   UserName u;
   return {u}; // this one will cause a copy of UserName
   return u;   // this one moves UserName
}


int main()
{
   auto d = CreateUser();
}

Why does return {u} cause a copy and return u a move?

Here's the related coliru sample: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/6bf853750b38d110

Another case (thanks to the comment from @Slava):

std::unique_ptr<int> foo() 
{ 
    std::unique_ptr<int> p; 
    return {p};  // uses copy of unique_ptr and so it breaks...
}
4
  • You forgot to remove unrelated to question operator new and delete in the example.
    – Slava
    Jul 18, 2018 at 13:13
  • 1
    @Slava deleted the delete/new overloads
    – fen
    Jul 18, 2018 at 13:16
  • 1
    Simpler code to reproduce: std::unique_ptr<int> foo() { std::unique_ptr<int> p; return {p}; }
    – Slava
    Jul 18, 2018 at 13:19
  • thanks @Slava - I've updated the question
    – fen
    Jul 18, 2018 at 13:25

3 Answers 3

29

Because returning a name of an object with automatic storage duration is treated as returning an rvalue of the object. Note this works only if the expression in the return statement is a (possibly parenthesized, not including braces) name, like return u; or return (u);, so return {u}; works as usual, i.e. the copy constructor is invoked.

Related part in the standard [class.copy.elision]/3:

In the following copy-initialization contexts, a move operation might be used instead of a copy operation:

  • If the expression in a return statement ([stmt.return]) is a (possibly parenthesized) id-expression that names an object with automatic storage duration declared in the body or parameter-declaration-clause of the innermost enclosing function or lambda-expression, or
  • ...

overload resolution to select the constructor for the copy is first performed as if the object were designated by an rvalue.

2
  • I don't understand why return{u} didn't get the same treatment as the others, I mean it's a return statement, the variable "u" is going out of scope, is there a case where a COPY should be used? Dec 11, 2020 at 16:45
  • @watashiSHUN I don't know. It's the rule. I think only the committee who made this rule knows the reason.
    – xskxzr
    Dec 14, 2020 at 3:12
6

This is a kind of braced-init-list. [dcl.init.list]/1.3

To be even more specific, it is an " expr-or-braced-init-list [dcl.init]/1

of a return statement " [stmt.return]/2

A return statement with any other operand shall be used only in a function whose return type is not cv void; the return statement initializes the glvalue result or prvalue result object of the (explicit or implicit) function call by copy-initialization from the operand.

From this point, let me qoutes xskxzr's answer that mention [class.copy.elision]/3

In the following copy-initialization contexts, a move operation might be used instead of a copy operation:

  • If the expression in a return statement ([stmt.return]) is a (possibly parenthesized) id-expression that names an object with automatic storage duration declared in the body or parameter-declaration-clause of the innermost enclosing function or lambda-expression, or

In normal human words, the reason that copy is called instead of move because braced-init-list call u that happened to be lvalue.

So, you may wanna know if braced-init-list call u that is rvalue ...

return {std::move(u)};

Well, u is moved to a new rvalue of UserName and copy elision works right after.

So this takes one move as in

return u;

godbolt.org/g/b6stLr

wandbox.org/permlink/7u1cPc0TG9gqToZD

#include <iostream>
#include <optional>

struct UserName
{
  int x;
  UserName() : x(0) {};
  UserName(const UserName& other) : x(other.x) { std::cout << "copy " << x << "\n"; };
  UserName(UserName&& other)      : x(other.x) { std::cout << "move "  << x << "\n"; };
};

std::optional<UserName> CreateUser()
{
  UserName u;
  return u;   // this one moves UserName
}

std::optional<UserName> CreateUser_listinit()
{
  UserName u;
  auto whatever{u};
  return whatever;
}

std::optional<UserName> CreateUser_listinit_with_copy_elision()
{
  UserName u;
  return {u};
}

std::optional<UserName> CreateUser_move_listinit_with_copy_elision()
{
  UserName u;
  return {std::move(u)};
}

int main()
{
  std::cout << "CreateUser() :\n";
  [[maybe_unused]] auto d = CreateUser();

  std::cout << "\nCreateUser_listinit() :\n";
  [[maybe_unused]] auto e = CreateUser_listinit();

  std::cout << "\nCreateUser_listinit_with_copy_elision() :\n";
  [[maybe_unused]] auto f = CreateUser_listinit_with_copy_elision();

  std::cout << "\nCreateUser_move_listinit_with_copy_elision() :\n";
  [[maybe_unused]] auto g = CreateUser_move_listinit_with_copy_elision();
}

print

CreateUser() :
move 0

CreateUser_listinit() :
copy 0
move 0

CreateUser_listinit_with_copy_elision() :
copy 0

CreateUser_move_listinit_with_copy_elision() :
move 0
1

return { arg1, arg2, ... } ;

is copy-list-initialization. the (return) object is initialized from the initializer list by copy-initialization for copy-list-initialization

3
  • 1
    but return u; is also a copy initialization, as mentioned copy initialization - cppreference.com
    – fen
    Jul 18, 2018 at 13:26
  • @fen copy initialization is not the same as copy list initialization
    – Caleth
    Jul 18, 2018 at 14:29
  • This doesn't actually. answer the question. Yes, return {u}; is copy-list-initialization. True. However, why does that copy while the other one moves?
    – Barry
    Jul 18, 2018 at 14:32

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