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In my Asp.net Core 2.0 application, I am trying to unit test my data service layer (.Net Standard Class Library) that uses the Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.IConfiguration dependency injection. I am using XUnit and don't know how to pass IConfiguration from my unit test class. I tried the following implementation and getting the error

Message: The following constructor parameters did not have matching fixture data: IConfiguration configuration.

I am really new to the testing frameworks and don't even know if dependency injection can be used as I am trying to do in my code snippet.

My Unit test class is as follow

public class SqlRestaurantDataCLUnitTest
{
    private readonly IConfiguration configuration;
    public SqlRestaurantDataCLUnitTest(IConfiguration configuration)
    {
        this.configuration = configuration;
    }
    [Fact]
    public void AddTest()
    {
        var restaurantDataCL = new SqlRestaurantDataCL(configuration);
        var restaurant = new Restaurant
        {
            Name = "TestName",
            Cuisine = CuisineType.None
        };

        var result = restaurantDataCL.Add(restaurant);

        Assert.IsNotType(null, result.Id);    
    }
}

My data service layer is as follow

public class SqlRestaurantDataCL : IRestaurantDataCL
{
    private readonly IConfiguration configuration;
    public SqlRestaurantDataCL(IConfiguration configuration)
    {
        this.configuration = configuration;
    }
    public Restaurant Add(Restaurant restaurant)
    {
        using (var db = GetConnection())
        {
            string insertSql = @"INSERT INTO [dbo].[RESTAURANTS]([Cuisine], [Name]) 
                                OUTPUT INSERTED.*
                                VALUES (@Cuisine, @Name)";

            restaurant = db.QuerySingle<Restaurant>(insertSql, new
            {
                Cuisine = restaurant.Cuisine,
                Name = restaurant.Name
            });

            return restaurant;
        }
    }

    private IDbConnection GetConnection()
    {
        return new SqlConnection(configuration.GetSection(Connection.Name).Value.ToString());
    }
}

public class Connection
{
    public static string Name
    {
        get { return "ConnectionStrings: OdeToFood"; }
    }
}
  • 1
    Why are you passing around an IConfiguration object anyway? Shouldn't you have a nice POCO with all your settings as properties? Anyway, just make an object that implements IConfiguration and returns the settings appropriate for your test. – DavidG Jul 18 '18 at 13:24
  • @David will you please explain with some code sample? – Learning Curve Jul 18 '18 at 13:26
  • I would have to agree with DavidG on this one about the IConfiguration dependency. How is this dependency being used. Show SqlRestaurantDataCL.GetConnection(). This might end up being a design issue masked in an XY problem – Nkosi Jul 18 '18 at 13:30
  • @Nkosi I have updated my question with the GetConnection() code. – Learning Curve Jul 18 '18 at 13:33
1

Unit tests have a very useful habit of exposing design issues. In this case you have made some design choices that prove difficult to test because of tight coupling to framework concerns as well as static concerns.

First, it looks like SqlRestaurantDataCL actually depends on a connection factory

public interface IDbConnectionFactory {
    IDbConnection GetConnection();
}

Which would refactor the data implementation as advised to depend on that abstraction.

public class SqlRestaurantDataCL : IRestaurantDataCL {
    private readonly IDbConnectionFactory factory;

    public SqlRestaurantDataCL(IDbConnectionFactory factory) {
        this.factory = factory;
    }
    public Restaurant Add(Restaurant restaurant) {
        using (var connection = factory.GetConnection()) {
            string insertSql = @"INSERT INTO [dbo].[RESTAURANTS]([Cuisine], [Name]) 
                                OUTPUT INSERTED.*
                                VALUES (@Cuisine, @Name)";

            restaurant = connection.QuerySingle<Restaurant>(insertSql, new {
                Cuisine = restaurant.Cuisine,
                Name = restaurant.Name
            });

            return restaurant;
        }
    }

    //...
}

The assumption is that Dapper is being used to make the query above.

With the introduction of the abstracted dependencies, they can be mocked as needed when testing in isolation.

public class SqlRestaurantDataCLUnitTest {

    [Fact]
    public void AddTest() {
        //Arrange
        var connection = new Mock<IDbConnection>();
        var factory = new Mock<IDbConnectionFactory>();
        factory.Setup(_ => _.GetConnection()).Returns(connection.Object);

        //...setup the connection to behave as expected

        var restaurantDataCL = new SqlRestaurantDataCL(factory.Object);
        var restaurant = new Restaurant {
            Name = "TestName",
            Cuisine = CuisineType.None
        };

        //Act
        var result = restaurantDataCL.Add(restaurant);

        //Assert
        Assert.IsNotType(null, result.Id);
    }
}

Now if you meant to actually touch the real database then this is not an isolation unit test but instead an integration test, that will have a different approach.

In production code, the factory can be implemented

public class SqlDbConnectionFactory : IDbConnectionFactory {
    private readonly ConnectionSetings connectionSettings;

    SqlDbConnectionFactory(ConnectionSetings connectionSettings) {
        this.connectionSettings = connectionSettings;
    }

    public IDbConnection GetConnection() {
        return new SqlConnection(connectionSettings.Name));
    }
}

Where ConnectionSetings is defined as a simple POCO to store the connection string

public class ConnectionSetings {
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

In the composition root the settings can be extracted from configurations

IConfiguration Configuration; //this would have been set previously

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services) {
    //...

    var settings = Configuration
        .GetSection("ConnectionStrings:OdeToFood")
        .Get<ConnectionSetings>();

    //...verify settings (if needed)

    services.AddSingleton(settings);
    services.AddSingleton<IDbConnectionFactory,SqlDbConnectionFactory>();
    services.AddSingleton<IRestaurantDataCL,SqlRestaurantDataCL>();
    //Note: while singleton was used above, You can decide to use another scope
    //      if so desired.
}

There was really no need to be passing IConfiguration around as it is more of a framework concern that is really only relevant at start up.

| improve this answer | |
  • Your answer really helped me to understand the concept. Thanks! – Learning Curve Jul 18 '18 at 14:15
  • It is complaining about the connection in factory.Setup(_=> _.GetConnection()).Returns(connection). It says, cannot convert from 'Moq.Mock<System.Data.IDbConnection>' to 'System.Data.IDbConnection' – Learning Curve Jul 18 '18 at 15:04
  • @LearningCurve that was a typo. fixed. – Nkosi Jul 18 '18 at 15:05
  • 1
    @LearningCurve have a look at this article mikhail.io/2016/02/unit-testing-dapper-repositories – Nkosi Jul 19 '18 at 11:56
  • 1
    @LearningCurve apparently dapper is a pain to unit test in isolation. found another library that might help github.com/half-ogre/dapper-wrapper – Nkosi Jul 19 '18 at 12:20

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