I want to run a custom replacement utility for values matching a regular expression. This means for every match of a regular expression, call a custom utility with the characters comprising the match. The output of the custom utility replaces the original characters.

Can illustrate using factor, but this case should not be considered exhaustive, for example may want to include expressions with $, %, and arithmetic operators:

$ factor 230
230: 2 5 23

Using this utility and invoking it for all integers in the input, this is an example input and output:

$ [code] <<< 'Given these numbers: 27, 13, 230, and 19, it is evident which are primes.'
Given these numbers: 27: 3 3 3, 13: 13, 230: 2 5 23, and 19: 19, it is evident which are primes.

I thought this might work, but it looks like it's trying to interpret the input directly. Using sed (GNU sed) 4.2.2.

$ sed -E 's/([0-9]+)/factor \1/ge' <<< 'Given these numbers: 27, 13, 230, and 19, it is evident which are primes.'
sh: 1: Given: not found

Obviously I'm not understanding what the e flag does. I tried doing this in awk:

$ awk '{r = gensub(/([0-9]+)/, system("factor \\1"), "g"); print r}' <<< 'Given the numbers with factors: 27, 13, 230, and 19, it is evident which are primes.'
1:
Given the numbers with factors: 0, 0, 0, and 0, it is evident which are primes.

I'm not sure where the 1: comes from, but it's apparent that it's printing just the return code from system. There doesn't appear to be a way to capture the standard output from a command in awk.

Is what I'm asking for possible in the core utilities?

  • try shellcheck.net to see what it flags. Generally don't use dbl-quotes for sed cmds. And some seds require escaping the parens for named buffers to work. '/\([0-9]+\)/factor \1/ge. That'a a weird error message, and not from sed. Good luck. – shellter Jul 18 at 14:36
  • @shellter - confirmed same results with single quotes; shellcheck indicates no issues. – Yimin Rong Jul 18 at 14:47
  • Also, its not clear from your code. Even if we get it to work, it will only insert the word "factor" before each number. Your Q seems to want to actually run a function on each of the found words. No version of sed that I know of will do that for you. You'll need to use a higher level language. I think it could be done in awk, and definitely python, perl and others. Good luck. – shellter Jul 18 at 14:55
  • "Is what I'm asking for possible in sed, perl, or awk?" . Just re-read this. Yes possible in perl and awk. Not in sed ;-) Good luck. – shellter Jul 18 at 14:57
  • 1
    IMHO, you're really holding yourself back, by trying to stick to one (really limited) tool. Anything beyond simple s/s/r/ replacements should be done in a real language designed with text processing in mind (yes, sed is definitely only for text processing ;-) ). What I always found was, that even though I mastered sed, csh for my current job scope, when I moved up, I found that I could spend hours trying to find a super advanced usage of csh OR I could just write it in 5 minutes using a bourne shell deriviative (bash, zsh, ksh). Just saying ;-) .... – shellter Jul 18 at 15:07
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The 1 in your awk command output comes from you printing the return code from system(). system() returns the exit status of the command it calls, not the output from the command - that just goes to stdout. Also, with the syntax you used system() is called before gensub() so you're calling factor with the literal string \\1.

The correct syntax to do what you tried to do with GNU awk:

awk '{r = gensub(/([0-9]+)/, system("factor \\1"), "g"); print r}'

is this which will work with any awk:

$ awk '{
    head = ""
    while ( match($0,/[0-9]+/) ) {
        cmd = "factor " substr($0,RSTART,RLENGTH)
        ret = ( (cmd | getline line) > 0 ? line : cmd " failed" )
        close(cmd)
        head = head substr($0,1,RSTART-1) ret
        $0 = substr($0,RSTART+RLENGTH)
    }
    $0 = head $0
    print
}' <<< 'Given these numbers: 27, 13, 230, and 19, it is evident which are primes.'
Given these numbers: 27: 3 3 3, 13: 13, 230: 2 5 23, and 19: 19, it is evident which are primes.

and with GNU awk for the 4th arg to split() it could be written as:

$ awk '{
    n = split($0,others,/[0-9]+/,nums)
    $0 = ""
    for (i=1; i<n; i++) {
        cmd = "factor " nums[i]
        ret = ( (cmd | getline line) > 0 ? line : cmd " failed" )
        close(cmd)
        $0 = $0 others[i] ret
    }
    $0 = $0 others[n]
    print
}' <<< 'Given these numbers: 27, 13, 230, and 19, it is evident which are primes.'
Given these numbers: 27: 3 3 3, 13: 13, 230: 2 5 23, and 19: 19, it is evident which are primes.
  • Thank you. Yours is the clearest answer so far. All the answers work more-or-less in the specific case, but I'm finding issues when trying to modify the regular expressions in all of them. For example, to recognize numbers written in assembly languages: $FFFF, &7777 %1111, the $ or the & messes up, and because all the quoting possibilities are "used up" there's no way to escape them and make the regex and/or the evaluation work. I think I'm just going to bite the bullet and write a parser in re2c. – Yimin Rong Jul 19 at 10:36
  • 2
    If you have to deal with "numbers" that are something other than digits then obviously you should have included that in your sample input/output. It'd almost certainly have been trivial for us to include whatever cases you have to deal with but at this point everyone's put effort into helping you solve the problem you said you had so YMV with getting people to revisit it now as everyone hates Chameleon Questions – Ed Morton Jul 19 at 11:14
  • I was debating how much detail to put in the question. If there's too much, it looks "well defined" and people suspect it's a homework question. Because I was asking a generic question, with the generic requirement of for every match of a regular expression, call a custom utility with the characters comprising the match I was hoping people would code for the generic case and not for the specific illustration. – Yimin Rong Jul 20 at 12:16
  • That's fine if you knew how to write the regular expression you really cared about but you got the generic answer (replace the regexp [0-9]+ in my scripts with your real regexp) to your generic question and now you say you can't use it for some reason and have to go write a parser in some tool. As long as you're happy I guess... – Ed Morton Jul 20 at 13:08

To replace numbers with the output of factor on each

echo "Given these numbers: 27, 13, 230, and 19, it is evident which are primes." | 
    perl -wnE'say s{([0-9]+)}{$f=qx(factor $1); chomp $f; $f}egr'

This uses /e modifier to evaluate the replacement side as code. The qx runs the command and returns its output, from which the newline is removed by chomp. With /g it keeps going through the string to replace all numbers. See below for explanations.

With the /r modifier the substitution operator s/// returns the modified string.

Output:

Given these numbers: 27: 3 3 3, 13: 13, 230: 2 5 23, and 19: 19, it is evident which are primes.

Read on for explanations, in the context of other approaches.


Original post

To extract numbers from lines of input and call a program on each on it, for example

echo "Given these numbers: 27, 13, 230, and 19, it is evident which are primes."
    | perl -wnE'say "Result: ", join(",", map { qx(factor $_) } /([0-9]+)/g)'

The regex's match operator in the list context returns matches, while the /g modifier makes it find all of them. That list is passed to map, which applies the code in its body to each element and returns the resulting list. The qx is the operator form of backticks, which returns the output of the command, what seems to be what you wanted.

I'll leave formatting of the output to you, here the list is join-ed by , and prepended by a string.

If the input lines are in a file

perl -wnE'say "Result: ", join(",", map { qx(factor $_) } /([0-9]+)/g)' file

For more involved processing you can assign the list of matches to an array and then do what you please with it

perl -wnE'@n = /([0-9]+)/g; for (@n) { say "process $_" }' file

This processes one line of input at a time.

More simply, to call the program factor on each number as it is matched

perl -wnE'while (/([0-9]+)/g) { say qx(factor $1) }' file

The regex in the while condition keeps looking for matches in each iteration, continuing from the position of the previous match, by the virtue of /g modifier in scalar context. Inside the body you can then do what you need with each captured match which is in $1.


  The list context in the first use of /g is imposed since map takes a list as input. In the second one the context is scalar since the code in the while condition is evaluated to a scalar.

  • Thank you for the answer. Unfortunately, I can't hardcode the output. It has to do a search and replace into the input. – Yimin Rong Jul 18 at 19:52
  • @YiminRong Moved the solution which directly replaces numbers in the string to the top (and corrected typos in it) – zdim Jul 19 at 0:31

Here's a solution for replacing the text within the string:

perl -MList::Util=pairs -E '($m,$s) = ($_->key,$_->value) and $ARGV[0] =~ s/$m/$s/ for pairs map {$_, qx/factor $_/} $ARGV[0] =~ /(\d+)/g; say $ARGV[0]' \
'Given these numbers: 27, 13, 230, and 19, it is evident which are primes'

Note that the output of factor has a newline at the end.

  • Thank you. So far yours seems to be the best answer. – Yimin Rong Jul 18 at 19:55
  • best because it's so clear that you can tell by reading it that it doesn't contain any bugs, (e.g. would it work if the input contained regexp or backreference metacharacters?) and/or you would find it easiest to enhance later when you have to build upon it and/or it's most portable and/or most efficient and/or best by some other measure? – Ed Morton Jul 18 at 20:06
  • It should work on any string. But I grant that it's not pretty. It would definitely be more readable as a script, in which case I would also be using strict syntax. – beasy Jul 18 at 23:02

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed 's/[0-9]\+/$(factor &)/g;s/.*/echo "&"/e' file

Surround all numbers by an inline function call, then surround the entire string by double quotes and evaluate that string using echo.

  • Thank you. The input may have $ and other special characters in it, so that might cause issues. – Yimin Rong Jul 18 at 19:44

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