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I am totally new to clojure.

I have a JSON like: { "1": true, "2": false, "3": true, "4": false }

I want to create an array of keys for which the value is true in clojure. In this example the array should be ["1", "3"].

Please help me. Any help would be appreciated.

  • This is pretty broad. What have you tried? I'd look into filter as well to filter out entires with a false value. – Carcigenicate Jul 19 '18 at 12:49
  • I dont understand the question. You mean you only want the keys? – jstuartmilne Jul 19 '18 at 12:52
  • @jstuartmilne Seems like they want the keys of the pairs with a truthy value. – Carcigenicate Jul 19 '18 at 12:53
  • Yes, I want an array of keys with a true value. – Tessy Thomas Jul 19 '18 at 14:36
  • welcome to Clojure, I'm assuming you're using data.json or cheshire to marshal the json into a Clojure map. once you've done that then filtering the map by the keys (the first example in leetwinski's answer) will work. This is because maps can be treated like functions which filter takes. – Gary Jul 20 '18 at 17:35
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there are also couple of short and simple snippets for that:

user> (filter m (keys m))
;;=> ("1" "3")

user> (keep (fn [[k v]] (when v k)) m)
;;=> ("1" "3")

user> (for [[k v] m :when v] k)
;;=> ("1" "3")
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If you're fine with using a vector instead of an array (since you're usually using vectors in Clojure anyway), you can do something like.

(defn keys-for-truthy-vals [m]
  (->> m (filter val) (mapv key)))

Note The mapv is only so the map call returns a vector. If you want a seq, just use map.

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  • key and val already exist to return the key and value of a map pair, so the let bindings are unnecessary. – Lee Jul 19 '18 at 14:59
  • @Lee thanks! I forgot about that. Updated my answer accordingly – Edward Minnix Jul 19 '18 at 15:00
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If your map is a Something like (->> (filter (fn [[k v]] v) a) (map (fn [[k v]] k))) will work. You can't do it with just a map because you need to drop certain values, so there will need to be some reducing or filtering.

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  • I tried (->> (filter (fn [[k v]] v) flavor-ids) (map (fn [[k v]] k))) But I am getting an error "Uncaught Error: Oops, Missing expected object key 'data'". – Tessy Thomas Jul 19 '18 at 14:48
  • Style nitpicking: if you use threading macros like ->>, then pull the "first" argument also into the first place. E.g. (->> a (filter (,,,)) (map (,,,))) – cfrick Jul 20 '18 at 5:16
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There is built-in function in the Tupelo library for this:

(submap-by-vals map-arg keep-vals & opts)

Returns a new map containing entries with the specified vals. Throws for missing vals,
unless `:missing-ok` is specified. Usage:

(submap-by-vals {:a 1 :b 2 :A 1} #{1  }             )  =>  {:a 1 :A 1}
(submap-by-vals {:a 1 :b 2 :A 1} #{1 9} :missing-ok )  =>  {:a 1 :A 1} 

You could then just use the keys function on the resulting map.

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Maybe this?

(->> foo (filter second) keys)

where foo is a map.

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0
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The same as already provided, just staying in maps.

(keys (filter val m))

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