1

I just know I'm being an idiot, so somebody please tell me how.

Setup is simple:

  1. Create a solution with three projects (.Net framework, class libraries) named InherTest, InherTest.Base, and InherTest.Base.Inherited

  2. In InherTest.Base, add the following class:

    namespace InherTest.Base { public abstract class BaseClass { internal abstract string MEMBER_1 { get; } } }

  3. Copy the exact same code into InherTest, including the namespace.

  4. In InherTest.Base.Inherited, add the following class:

    namespace InherTest.Base.Inherited { public class Inherited : BaseClass { internal override string MEMBER_1 { get; } } }

  5. Add a project reference in InherTest.Base.Inherited to InherTest.Base. Note the errors ("abstract member not implemented" and "no suitable member found to override").

  6. Remove that reference and replace it with one to InherTest. Observe that the inheritance also fails.

Why don't they both work?

Edit: Originally I stated that one test would fail and the other would succeed; however, both inheritance attempts fail in the above scenario.

  • 1
    MEMBER_1 should be declared public – Rahul Jul 19 '18 at 15:23
  • 2
    Why don't they both work? <= They should both fail if they contain the same code as you claim. If that is not the case then the code is different between the 2 projects, specifically the MEMBER_1 is probably declared as public in InherTest project. Alternatively you have an assembly level attribute [assembly:InternalsVisibleTo("InherTest.Base.Inherited")] in the project InherTest – Igor Jul 19 '18 at 15:26
  • @Igor is right. I created a solution according to your instructions and they both fail, for the reason given by Rahul and Dale. – Joe Farrell Jul 19 '18 at 15:28
  • @Igor you're right, I've corrected the question. Thanks. – Daniel Jul 19 '18 at 16:07
5

This is because the string is internal so limited to it's own project

  • Thanks @Dale. I see the issue, but that still left me with a problem. Since the base class was in another assembly, I had to change the member to Public (which I didn't want) so it could be inherited. The best solution I could find was to create a Shared Project with the base class so it would be included in any assembly that referenced it. – Daniel Jul 19 '18 at 16:18
  • You can use protected internal , or just protected if only derived classes need access to it. – George Helyar Jul 19 '18 at 17:47
1

Why don't they both work?

They should both fail if they contain the same code as you claim. If that is not the case then the code is different between the 2 projects, specifically the MEMBER_1 is probably declared as public in InherTest project.

The only way that a reference to InherTest would work with the same code you posted is if you have this assembly level attribute InternalsVisibleToAttribute in the project InherTest

[assembly:InternalsVisibleTo("InherTest.Base.Inherited")]
-2

Inherited Namespaces are in different project. (Name spaces seems like together but they are not in a same assembly). You can read that article.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/language-reference/keywords/internal

  • 3
    internal refers to assemblies, not namespaces. Not my downvote btw – Panagiotis Kanavos Jul 19 '18 at 15:22
  • "Create a solution with three projects" Sorry I mean becuase of these three different projects (they seems like same namespace but they are not in same assembly) – Murat Tüfekçi Jul 19 '18 at 15:24

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