The client program below receives messages from a WebSocket server.
It doesn't send any messages.

CLIENT

use v6;
use Cro::WebSocket::Client;

constant WS-URL = 'ws://localhost:20000/status';
constant TIMEOUT-TO-CONNECT = 5; # seconds

my $timeout;
my $connection-attempt;

await Promise.anyof(
  $connection-attempt = Cro::WebSocket::Client.connect(WS-URL),
  $timeout = Promise.in(TIMEOUT-TO-CONNECT));

if $timeout.status == Kept
{
  say "* could not connect to server in ', TIMEOUT-TO-CONNECT, ' seconds";
  exit 1;
}

if $connection-attempt.status != Kept
{
  my $cause = $connection-attempt.cause;
  say '"* error when trying to connect to server';
  say '"* --------------------------------------';
  # $cause is a long string, how do we get a simple numeric code ?
  say $cause;
  say '"* ======================================';
  exit 1;
}

my $connection = $connection-attempt.result;
my $peer = 'localhost:20000';
say '* connected with ', $peer;

react
{
  whenever $connection.messages -> $message
  {
    my $body = await $message.body;
    say '* received message=[' ~ $body ~ '] from server';
    LAST { say '* LAST'; done; }
    QUIT { default { say '* QUIT'; done; }}
  }
  CLOSE { say '* CLOSE: leaving react block';}
} # react

SERVER

use Cro::HTTP::Router;
use Cro::HTTP::Server;
use Cro::HTTP::Router::WebSocket;

my $application =
route
{
  get -> 'status'
  {
    web-socket -> $incoming
    {
      my $counter = 0;
      my $timer = Supply.interval(1);

      supply
      {
        whenever $incoming -> $thing
        {
          LAST { note '* LAST: client connection was closed'; done; }
          QUIT { default { note '* QUIT: error in client connection'; done;  } }
        }
        whenever $timer
        {
          $counter++;
          say '* sending message ', $counter;
          emit $counter.Str;
        }
        CLOSE { say '* CLOSE: leaving supply block'; }
      } # supply
    } #incoming
  } # get -> status
}

my $server = Cro::HTTP::Server.new: :port(20000), :$application;

$server.start;

say '* serving on port 20000';

react whenever signal(SIGINT)
{
  $server.stop;
  exit;
}

Now, when the server goes out (say, by Ctrl+C) the client sees nothing.

Setting CRO_TRACE=1 in the client gives this:

TRACE(anon 2)] Cro::WebSocket::MessageParser EMIT WebSocket Message - Text

* received message=[4] from server
[TRACE(anon 1)] Cro::TCP::Connector DONE
[TRACE(anon 2)] Cro::WebSocket::FrameParser DONE
[TRACE(anon 2)] Cro::WebSocket::MessageParser DONE
[TRACE(anon 1)] Cro::HTTP::ResponseParser DONE
^C  

The client showed nothing more (and then I cancelled it).

So, the question is: how should the client deal with this scenario ?

UPDATE

Edited the question, now showing the server code
Also, I'm in Fedora 28. When I first cancel the server, netstat shows

$ netstat -ant | grep 20000
tcp6       0      0 ::1:20000               ::1:56652               TIME_WAIT  
$

Tcpdump shows

IP6 ::1.20000 > ::1.56652: Flags [F.], seq 145, ack 194, win 350, options [nop,nop,TS val 1476681452 ecr 1476680552], length 0
IP6 ::1.56652 > ::1.20000: Flags [F.], seq 194, ack 146, win 350, options [nop,nop,TS val 1476681453 ecr 1476681452], length 0
IP6 ::1.20000 > ::1.56652: Flags [.], ack 195, win 350, options [nop,nop,TS val 1476681453 ecr 1476681453], length 0

It seems the last ACK from the client to the server is missing, I guess the client didn't close the connection.

Also, I'm curious as to why Cro chooses to work with IPv6 by default.

  • I can't test at the moment, but it might be possible the connection doesn't recognize that it's closed when you kill the server with ^C. Does it still show up in netstat (or whatever's equivalent on your OS)? – Kaiepi Jul 21 at 7:17
  • 3
    Hi. It is a confirmed bug, but it is yet to be fixed. I hope the fix will be ready soon, starting from working Monday. The ticket you can track progress with is: github.com/croservices/cro-websocket/issues/15 Otherwise, I think your code is correct, so stack overflow rules are likely to restrict "not a questions" like this. Thanks for your patience and sorry for inconvenience. – Takao Jul 21 at 22:50
  • 1
    @Takao It can sometimes be difficult to tell where the line is between a question that should be closed and one that shouldn't, particularly for new people. This one provided enough information that I think it is probably safe from being closed. The reason for closing is to keep the quality and usefulness of posts up. – Brad Gilbert Jul 22 at 0:46

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